Starter Homes vs. Renting: Where Homeowners Can Save

first_img  Print This Post Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Journal In a report released Wednesday by Trulia, a handful of cities contain starter homes that cost less than living in a rental in the long-term. While moving in with a roommate vs. living alone is guaranteed to cut your payments in half, starter homes can be a wiser long-term investment. If getting a roommate is necessary, it will be easier to do so in the larger space a starter home provides compared to a rental unit. In the report, Trulia assumes buyers are making the choice to take on a 30-year fixed rate loan and paying 20 percent upfront if they buy, but based on the data, “buying a home is 37.4 percent cheaper for households who move every seven years” than renting. When Trulia accounted for the total monthly costs of buying a starter home, including mortgage payments, maintenance, insurance, and taxes, Michigan, Florida, Alabama, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee all contained cities showing starter homes to be 50 percent cheaper to buy than renting a housing unit with someone else over seven years. The cities include Detroit, West Palm Beach, Birmingham, Philadelphia, Memphis, and Knoxville respectively.In Detroit, a starter home can be purchased for as low as $16,463, whereas a home in West Palm Beach can be purchased for $107,083. Homes in Birmingham, Philadelphia, Memphis and Knoxville can all be purchased for less than $60,000 based on Trulia’s data. Still, it’s important to act on these starter homes quickly, as Trulia’s recent Price and Inventory Watch found a 20.4 percent drop in starter home inventory year-over-year nationwide.To calculate the cost of buying and renting, Trulia used their quality-adjusted measure of home prices and rentals, calculated initial and future monthly costs, and took into account expected price and rent appreciation as well as projected inflation. They also factored in one-time costs and proceeds, including closing costs, down payments, sale proceeds, and security deposits.To see the full methodology and data sets, click here. Sign up for DS News Daily Home / Daily Dose / Starter Homes vs. Renting: Where Homeowners Can Save Buyers buying Detroit Homeowners Memphis Philadelphia Rentals Renting Starter Homes Trulia West Palm Beach 2017-10-12 Dean Terrell Related Articles Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago October 12, 2017 1,417 Views Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Previous: JPMorgan Chase Beats Wall Street Revenue Estimates Next: Freddie Mac Announces Small-Pool Pilot With EarnUp Starter Homes vs. Renting: Where Homeowners Can Save The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Share Save The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago About Author: Dean Terrell Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Tagged with: Buyers buying Detroit Homeowners Memphis Philadelphia Rentals Renting Starter Homes Trulia West Palm Beach Subscribelast_img read more

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Statistical optimisation of phenol degradation and pathway identification through whole genome sequencing of the cold-adapted Antarctic bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. strain AQ5-07

first_imgStudy of the potential of Antarctic microorganisms for use in bioremediation is of increasing interest due to their adaptations to harsh environmental conditions and their metabolic potential in removing a wide variety of organic pollutants at low temperature. In this study, the psychrotolerant bacterium Rhodococcus sp. strain AQ5-07, originally isolated from soil from King George Island (South Shetland Islands, maritime Antarctic), was found to be capable of utilizing phenol as sole carbon and energy source. The bacterium achieved 92.91% degradation of 0.5 g/L phenol under conditions predicted by response surface methodology (RSM) within 84 h at 14.8 °C, pH 7.05, and 0.41 g/L ammonium sulphate. The assembled draft genome sequence (6.75 Mbp) of strain AQ5-07 was obtained through whole genome sequencing (WGS) using the Illumina Hiseq platform. The genome analysis identified a complete gene cluster containing catA, catB, catC, catR, pheR, pheA2, and pheA1. The genome harbours the complete enzyme systems required for phenol and catechol degradation while suggesting phenol degradation occurs via the β-ketoadipate pathway. Enzymatic assay using cell-free crude extract revealed catechol 1,2-dioxygenase activity while no catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity was detected, supporting this suggestion. The genomic sequence data provide information on gene candidates responsible for phenol and catechol degradation by indigenous Antarctic bacteria and contribute to knowledge of microbial aromatic metabolism and genetic biodiversity in Antarctica.last_img read more

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Various Mid-Utah Radio Sports Network Athletes Compete At Wasatch XC Invitational

first_imgSeptember 7, 2019 /Sports News – Local Various Mid-Utah Radio Sports Network Athletes Compete At Wasatch XC Invitational Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailHEBER CITY, Utah-Saturday, at Solider Hollow, several Mid-Utah Radio Sports Network schools and athletes competed at the the Wasatch Cross Country Invitational, hosted by Wasatch High School.The Mountain View girls took the team title with 31 points and Wasatch’s Abbie Randall was the individual girls’ champion (21:09.70) in the 5-K.For the boys, American Fork’s Ashton Hysell won the individual title in the 5-K (17:16.90) and he led the Cavemen to the team title with 41 points.Ashley Lagat of Wasatch Academy placed second (21:28.20) and her teammate, Purity Kattam, finished 14th overall (22:43.60).Aubry Cook of North Sanpete finished 30th (24:00.30) and her teammate, Tamsin Stewart, finished 44th overall (24:52.50).Rachael Jones of North Sanpete placed 53rd (25:29.60) and North Sanpete’s Madelyn Christensen placed 55th (25:55.20).For the boys, Matt Hindes of North Sanpete placed 18th overall (18:10.80) and Gage Cox of North Sanpete finished 39th (19:19.40).North Sanpete’s Morgan Bowles placed 57th (19:58.90) and Cayler Cook of North Sanpete finished 58th overall (20:01.10). Wynn Allred of North Sanpete placed 73rd (20:56.70) and North Sanpete’s Levi Bowles placed 81st (22:12.00). Tags: Cross Country Brad Jameslast_img read more

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Welsh start-up helps landlords

first_imgHome » News » Welsh start-up helps landlords previous nextProducts & ServicesWelsh start-up helps landlordsThe Negotiator28th September 201701,356 Views Credas, a Cardiff-based technology start-up, is using real-time facial recognition technology to help companies speed up and simplify the process of ID verification, enabling estate and lettings agents to easily comply with Right to Rent legislation.The first of its kind in the UK, Credas enables landlords and letting agents to verify essential ID documents and match the photos on those documents with the person, in real-time, by using an app.By texting or emailing a link to the Credas app, potential tenants can verify themselves anywhere, any time. This truly mobile and real-time identification verification technology can verify up to 4,000 types of ID.Credas helps landlords and agents with the audit trail needed to comply with Right to Rent, as it records the verification on its highly secure cloud-based platform. This takes the burden off the landlord to keep the ID, as it will be automatically stored. It reduces the risk of a criminal record, as well as a possible fine of up to £3,000. Therefore, using Credas also minimises reputational risk.Rhys David, formerly at Gocompare.com, says, “Right to Rent legislation has increased costs and time spent verifying tenants. Having to physically check that the photo ID matches the tenant can be difficult if they are relocating from another part of the UK. Credas solves all of these problems in one handy app, enabling letting agents to hook up their own CRM to our verification engine.www.credas.co.ukreal-time facial recognition technology ID verification Credas September 28, 2017The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more

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Chubby Checker, Fans Twist Away the Night

first_imgBy Tim KellyChubby Checker, 77, taking a pause from his high-energy show Friday night at the Ocean City Music Pier, put it all in perspective.“At this stage of my life, each and every day I wake up, it’s a miracle,” said Checker, whose ’60s dance anthem, “The Twist,” is the biggest selling rock ‘n’ roll record of all time. The comment brought a smattering of applause from the near sellout, mostly 70-something crowd.  “And some of us are still makin’ money!” he quipped to laughs, then applause.With the mellow moment behind him, Checker went back to the business of rock ‘n’ roll. It was like that throughout the show, the kickoff event for Ocean City’s Night in Venice weekend.Checker, who will also be waving to the crowd in one of the lead vessels in the annual boat parade Saturday evening, put on a show one might hope to see from a rocker one-third his age.He belts out a song with a voice that is still strong.Backed by his hard-driving, five-piece band, the Wildcats, Checker reeled off cover versions of old-school rock standards such as Fats Domino’s “I’m Walkin’” and “Blueberry Hill” as well as his own string of hits, including “Let’s Twist Again,” “The Hucklebuck,” “Limbo Rock” and, of course, “The Twist.” The fans were getting into the concert as much as the iconic rocker, a South Carolina native who grew up in South Philadelphia. They clapped along, danced in the aisles and took hundreds of pictures on their smartphones.Still fit and trim from a daily workout regimen and a concert schedule that sees him performing more than 70 dates per year, Checker’s enthusiasm and energy were infectious.Typical of the fans were Diane and Mel Jenkins of Marmora, high school sweethearts who have been married for 56 years and said they’ve always loved Chubby Checker and his music.“I was a senior in high school and Diane was a sophomore when the Twist (burst onto the music and pop culture scene),” Mel said. “We used to do the twist at our high school dances. When we saw he was coming to Ocean City, we got right on it (and bought tickets).”Wayne Schaible and wife, Sharon, of Ocean City, display their “Twist” memorabilia before the show.Mel and Diane Jenkins scored seats in the front row of the historic venue, as did Wayne Schaible and his wife, Sharon, of Ocean City.“We’re going to try and get an autograph,” Wayne said. He held up a poster from Checker’s first live performance of “The Twist” at the Rainbow Club on Pacific Avenue in Wildwood.  If that didn’t catch Checker’s attention, Sharon displayed a vintage “The Twist” ukulele.Checker, wearing a pale blue shirt, black pants and jacket and blue and black checkerboard pattern boots, put on plenty of athletic dance moves to complement his still-strong vocals. About eight songs into the concert, he bounded down the stairs off the stage and began pulling spectators, both male and female, out of their seats to dance along with him.“He’s unbelievable,” said Lynn Culvers, of Lumberton, who saw Checker recently at a show in Florida. “What an entertainer.” Chubby Checker bounds off stage to get close to his fans. Chubby Checker engages his audience at the Music Pier.last_img read more

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Craig R. McCoy wins 2010 I.F. Stone Medal for Journalistic Independence

first_imgThe Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard will present the 2010 I.F. Stone Medal for Journalistic Independence to Craig R. McCoy, an investigative reporter at the Philadelphia Inquirer.For almost three decades, McCoy has exposed injustice and corruption in Philadelphia through his probing and meticulous investigative work. McCoy most recently headed a team that uncovered entrenched problems in Philadelphia’s criminal justice system, including abysmal conviction rates, rampant witness fear, and a massive number of fugitives.Using statistical analysis, the paper’s investigation and resulting series, “Justice: Delayed, Dismissed, Denied,” showed that defendants charged with violent crimes were escaping conviction in nearly two-thirds of cases. The reporting has triggered major reforms, including new state Supreme Court judicial rules, two investigations, federal and state hearings, and new legislation. McCoy joined staff writers Nancy Phillips, Dylan Purcell, John Sullivan, and Emilie Lounsberry in this project. In previous years, McCoy was part of larger teams that twice were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize.Established in 2008, the Stone Medal rewards journalistic independence and honors the life of investigative journalist I.F. Stone. The award is administered by the Nieman Foundation and its Nieman Watchdog Project and is presented annually to a journalist whose work captures the spirit of independence, integrity, and courage that characterized I.F. Stone’s Weekly, published 1953-1971.McCoy will receive the award during a ceremony at Boston University’s College of Communication on Oct. 5. To read the full announcement.last_img read more

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Robot hands gain a gentler touch

first_imgWhat use is a hand without nerves, that can’t tell what it’s holding? A hand that lifts a soda to your lips, but inadvertently tips or crushes the can in the process?Researchers at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a very inexpensive tactile sensor for robotic hands that is sensitive enough to turn a brute machine into a dexterous manipulator.Designed by researchers in the Harvard Biorobotics Laboratory at SEAS, the sensor, called TakkTile, is intended to put what would normally be a high-end technology within the grasp of commercial inventors, teachers, and robotics enthusiasts.“Despite decades of research, tactile sensing hasn’t moved into general use because it’s been expensive and fragile,” explains co-creator Leif Jentoft, a graduate student at SEAS. “It normally costs about $16,000, give or take, to put tactile sensing on a research robot hand. That’s really limited where people can use it. The traditional technology also uses very specialized construction techniques, which can slow down your work. Now, Takktile changes that because it’s based on much simpler and cheaper fabrication methods.”TakkTile takes an existing device — a tiny barometer, which senses air pressure — and adds a layer of vacuum-sealed rubber to it, protecting it from as much as 25 pounds of direct pressure. Jentoft and co-creator Yaroslav Tenzer, a postdoctoral fellow, say that the chips can even survive a strike from a hammer or a baseball bat. At the same time, TakkTile is sensitive enough to detect a very slight touch.The result, when added to a mechanical hand, is a robot that knows what it’s touching. It can pick up a balloon without popping it. It can pick up a key and use it to unlock a door.Beyond robotics, Jentoft and Tenzer suggest that the TakkTile sensor could be used in a range of electronic devices. A toy manufacturer could make a stuffed puppy that responds to petting; a medical device designer could create a laparoscopic gripper that’s gentle enough to tease apart tissue during surgery.“Not everyone has the bandwidth to do the research themselves, but there are plenty of people who could find new applications and ways of using this,” says Tenzer.The sensors can be built using relatively simple equipment; the patented process relies on standard methods used in printed circuit board fabrication, along with access to a vacuum chamber. The tiny barometers are available cheaply because they have been widely used in cellphones and GPS units that can sense altitude.Along with their adviser, Robert D. Howe, Abbott and James Lawrence Professor of Engineering at SEAS, Jentoft and Tenzer are pursuing commercial opportunities with help from Harvard’s Office of Technology Development. Harvard plans to license the technology to companies interested in offering prefabricated sensors or in integrating TakkTile sensing into products such as robots, consumer devices, and industrial products.last_img read more

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The worry over North Korea

first_img North Korea probably didn’t detonate an H-bomb, analysts say, but isolated nation’s program is gaining sophistication Nuclear nervousness Related Despite stern warnings from both China and the United States, North Korea tried to launch another test missile this week. Amid ramped-up global tensions over that nation’s rising nuclear capabilities, President Trump has promised a tough response. Vice President Mike Pence, visiting Seoul, and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said the administration could act more forcefully over the weapons testing. North Korean leader Kim Jong-un responded that he could embark on “all-out war” if provoked.North Korea’s latest missile launch failed, according to U.S. military officials. The attempt took place just one day after the government, during an elaborate military parade, displayed four missile systems that showed the nation continues to push its weapons program despite economic sanctions and tough talk from the U.S. government. Nuclear security analyst Gary Samore, A.M. ’78, Ph.D. ’84, is executive director for research at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard Kennedy School. He shaped U.S. nuclear policy as White House coordinator for arms control and weapons of mass destruction during the first term of the Obama administration and was the U.S. emissary during the 2010 and 2012 nuclear security summits. Samore spoke with The Gazette about the concern over North Korea’s nuclear test and the challenges the United States faces over the weapons program. GAZETTE: What do you think happened with the missile test? Was it an accidental internal failure, a deliberate ruse to obscure North Korea’s true capacity, or outside cyber sabotage, as some speculate?SAMORE: Well, there was a failure. I don’t know why it failed except there’s been quite a high rate of failure over the last year, and my guess is that’s mainly due to a very rushed pace of development. The North Korean missile program is making some progress, but I think that Kim Jong-un is willing to tolerate a very high rate of failure in his effort to try to develop a more credible long-range capability as quickly as possible. He may feel that he’s got a window of time to try to perfect some of these long-range systems, and he doesn’t seem to be deterred by all of the threats that the U.S. and China and other countries have been trying to dissuade him from continuing testing. But obviously, that’s not working.GAZETTE: What do you make of Kim’s “all-out war” comment? Was that a declaration of some sort, do you think?SAMORE: I think this is all just noise. Both sides are rattling sabers, but neither side is going to start a war. We recognize that a military attack on North Korea would probably not be effective in terms of destroying North Korea’s nuclear weapons and missile program and would run the risk of a North Korean retaliation against South Korea and Japan, which could cost hundreds of thousands of lives. And the North Koreans know that any attack on U.S. allies in the region would provoke an American response that would destroy them. So I think both sides are posturing, but I think the risk of war is very low.GAZETTE: Does China’s warning last week about “storm clouds” brewing suggest we’ve entered into dangerous, new territory with North Korea?SAMORE: I don’t think so. The Trump administration is trying to intimidate North Korea not to continue testing, and that intimidation includes both a military element . . . and the threat of additional sanctions. The Chinese are certainly playing along with the sanctions threat. The Chinese have communicated to North Korea publicly and privately that if they continue testing and, in particular, if they conduct a nuclear test, then China is going to join the United States in imposing additional U.N Security Council sanctions.GAZETTE: What difference can China make here and, given its track record, do you think it’s likely they’ll actually do something this time? What leverage, if any, does Trump have to get China to follow through?SAMORE: The good news for Trump is that China is genuinely upset about Kim Jong-un continuing to carry out this testing activity. In the last two U.N. Security Council resolutions, the Chinese have, for the first time, begun to sanction North Korea’s general economy — in this case, exports of coal and other minerals. If you look at some of the media in China, which is I think intended to be a warning to North Korea, the Chinese have floated the idea that they would begin to curtail oil exports to North Korea, which would be very damaging to the North Korean economy. So I think the Chinese are serious about imposing additional economic sanctions.On the other hand, the Chinese have always been unwilling to impose the kind of economic sanctions that could lead to economic collapse and instability in North Korea, and I think that continues to be the case. If the North Koreans do conduct a nuclear test or a successful test of a long-range missile system, I think you’ll see another U.N. Security Council resolution, which will take another step toward broader economic sanctions against North Korea, but still be short of the kind of sanctions that would be fatal to its economy.GAZETTE: How far along does North Korea’s nuclear program appear to be now? What is the next significant technological benchmark for them to reach?SAMORE: We know that they’re capable of producing nuclear weapons because they’ve tested five times. And we know they have a lot of experience testing short- and medium-range missiles, missiles that could strike targets in South Korea and Japan. What North Korea has never demonstrated is the ability to carry out a long-range missile test and successfully deliver a payload, and that’s the big weakness or the big gap in their system. They have a lot of long-range missiles on paper, and they’ve paraded mock-ups through the streets, but they’ve never actually successfully tested a long-range system … so until they do that, they don’t have a credible ability to target the United States with missiles. How far out are they? I have no way of judging. I don’t think we’ll know until they do it. GAZETTE: Politically speaking, hasn’t the mere ability to hit either South Korea or Japan been sufficient leverage for them?SAMORE: I think so. But I think they would feel even more comfortable if they could attack the United States directly. That’s their goal, and I think they’re trying to reach that goal. And sooner or later, they will, unless we are able to stop or delay their testing program. They will eventually achieve that capability. But you’re right. Their ability to attack South Korea and Japan has been sufficient for deterrence for decades. Even before they had nuclear weapons, the ability to target Seoul with conventional weapons — artillery and rockets and so forth — has been sufficient to deter the United States and our allies from attacking them. I have no doubt that Kim Jong-un would like to demonstrate in a credible way that he could attack the United States, but I have no way of judging how far away they are from achieving that.GAZETTE: You characterized the recent tough talk from the Trump administration and Kim Jong-un as saber rattling. Do you see evidence of a strategy underpinning U.S. talk and, if not, what should we be doing?SAMORE: It’s a good question. We obviously don’t have any solution to this problem. That’s why the North Koreans have been proceeding to develop their nuclear and missile programs since we first discovered them in 1984. So this is a problem that goes back to President Reagan, and we have failed, over the past five presidents, to find a way to resolve the problem, although I think we’ve been able to slow it down at different times through a combination of diplomacy and military intimidation and sanctions and so forth. So there’s no new secret out there; there’s no policy tool that hasn’t been tried already.I think the Trump administration is right to try to build up leverage through economic sanctions, and then, at some point, I hope they will pivot to an effort to try to negotiate constraints and limits on North Korea’s nuclear and missile program in exchange for sanctions relief, because we’ve begun to build up some pretty good bargaining leverage now, with Chinese help. So they’re doing the first part, which is the pressure part. Whether they ever get around to the second part, which is trying to negotiate …GAZETTE: Are talks realistic?SAMORE: I think it’s unclear. I think they have to wait and see, first of all, what the new South Korean government is like. The South Koreans have an election on May 9, and both of the candidates frankly are likely to have a less hard-line position than the current government, that of former President Park Geun-hye. So we’ll have to coordinate, as we always do, with the Koreans on a way forward. Then obviously President Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping have started to have a conversation about this issue, as well. I don’t think it’s possible, at this point, to predict whether the Trump administration will pivot to a negotiation strategy once they feel they have substantial bargaining leverage.President Trump has exhibited tremendous flexibility in his foreign policy positions, having reversed just about everything he said he would do from the campaign. I just think it’s premature to judge. But in any event, the likelihood of diplomacy succeeding in anything more than delay, I think, is extremely low. So separately from whatever diplomacy we pursue, we’re also going to need to continue to develop and expand missile defense as a way to protect ourselves because sooner or later, the North Koreans will demonstrate that they have the ability to attack the United States directly.GAZETTE: Is there any reason to believe that if Kim Jong-un were removed, that there might be a possibility of détente?SAMORE: It’s a very good question. It depends on the scenario. If it’s simply a military coup, so Kim Jong-un is replaced by a junta of generals, then it’s not likely to fundamentally change North Korea’s policy, although they might be more willing to accept limits on the program. If there’s a complete collapse of the North Korean system — again, not likely, but if it happened — and there was unification under South Korean auspices, then I think you could solve the problem. I think whatever nuclear weapons they had would then be removed in that scenario.This interview has been edited for clarity and length.last_img read more

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BRO Athletes: Luke Woodward Reflects on the Upcoming Cyclocross Season

first_imgAs I sit at my desk browsing race wheels on ebay, putting a race calendar together and writing down goals for the coming cyclocross season, I’m feeling a weird mix of excitement and a hint of annoyance. Excitement because, simply, cyclocross season. Call it crazy, but  I start bouncing in my seat just thinking of an hour of racing a single speed cross-bred of a bike on caution-taped courses of sand, grass and mud, in between drunken, cowbell ringing, heckling fans.  Annoyance because all of the goals I wrote down look familiar. Aka, goals that I didn’t achieve over the last few seasons.  I’ve done this long enough that the improvement from year to year has tapered off, and the same goals are appearing for the next season. And it irks my need to improve and rather competitive self.And then I remember a particular race from last year.  It was the Kingswood Park UCI (pro) race, part of the Cincy3 Cyclocross Festival.  It’s one of the biggest cross races in the US, held under the lights in a park walking distance from the house I lived in when in high school.Since my high school days, I’ve gone on to attend school at Virginia Tech, and my family has moved on to Raleigh, NC, and none of us get back to Cincinnati often. Despite the fact that it had been on the list of races to hit the last few years, I wasn’t able to do it for various reasons. Last year was different, as I was taking a semester off of school to work a co-op, in no other place than Cincinnati. Honestly, I was more excited to spend another fall racing bikes in one of the biggest cyclocross towns in the country, catching up with the great people and families that I knew from racing and working at the local shop in high school than I was about the job.And I was no more excited than the first weekend of November for the Cincy3. It had been a dream for the last few years to get up to Ohio for this race. Three days of racing with the biggest names in the states, with one of them being under the lights, and another being the first ever Pan-American Cyclocross Championships.  And to make it that much better, my family was coming up from Raleigh for it, my grandparents were coming down from the Toledo, OH area, and there was bound to be plenty of friends to run into.Saturday morning brought chilling air and the short lived snow flakes added to the excitement. The day’s races were filled with a bunny hopping fest by my brother and fellow BRO athlete, a non-exciting single speed race on my end, and plenty of hectic-ness to get ready for races. In between races brought on some great spectating, catching up with neighbors and friends, as well as some heckling and cowbell ringing.As the afternoon drew on, I started to think about and prepare for the UCI race in the evening. It would be my first UCI race, and I was racing much more to say that I raced with the big boys than to do well. Heck, my plan was to go balls to the wall just to see how long before I got lapped and pulled.Walking back to the van, I realized that I had lost my numbers. In the chaos of the day, I must have put them down in a nook in the van or dropped them in the porta potty. Despite desperate search attempts by my mom and I, they were nowhere to be found. So we walked back up to registration, me feeling like a dog with its tail between its legs.  What an idiot, I thought. “Sooooo, my son lost his number for the elite men’s race, any chance he could get another one?” My mom asked, as I couldn’t bring myself to ask.“Well, let’s see. Looks like you’re in luck. We’ve got just one left, 99.” The official at registration checking in told us as he handed me a fresh set of numbers.I chuckled a sigh of relief, “Thanks a bunch!” As I handed the new set of numbers to my mom “Maybe you should hang on to these until I pin them up…”“Yeah, no kidding,” and turning to another official, smiling, she asked caringly “Long day?” Both of the officials nodded their head slowly.   They had been here since seven in the morning, and wouldn’t likely get out until midnight. “Can I bring you back a cup of coffee or something?” They reassured my mom they were fine and had plenty of caffeine through the day.Walking back to car, my mom and I decided to head to Panera for a rather traditional pre-race coffee instead of a sit-down Italian restaurant that the rest of the family and grandparents were off to. As good as some pasta sounded, two hours out I wanted little more than a banana, a bite of a bagel, and as much coffee as I could down without shaking while warming up.As I sat in Panera with Momma, pinning numbers to my skinsuit and chugging Hazelnut coffee, I couldn’t help but feel a little selfish. Here I was, getting ready for a race I had been dying to hit for years. My family and grandparents had come to my temporary hometown, and I had opted go caffeinate my tired self instead of spending time with them.  As we headed out, my Mom paid for another coffee to go. “Who’s that for?”“The official at registration.” I nodded, not surprised that she actually followed through on her offer.Back at the race course, I stayed in the van to stay warm, procrastinate actually warming up, and blasted music to try to get into the race mindset, while my mom went on a coffee delivery. Five minutes later she came back, “I don’t think I’ve ever seen anyone more excited for a cup of coffee. The official just stood up and gave me a big hug and said thank you, while the other official gave me the thumbs up.  Something different at every race.”In that moment, I couldn’t help but turn down my music, look her in the eye, and just smile ear to ear.  No words.  Just a smile. I don’t know what of. Gratitude, inspiration, understanding maybe?  In that moment, that Saturday evening wasn’t just about bike racing. It was about much, much more. It was about friends, it was about family, it was about dreams and it was about making a difference in a stranger’s day. Bike racing had just happened to be the means by which it was all happening.The next fifteen minutes entailed quite the heart to heart conversation about the purpose of racing, really the purpose of pursuing anything that we have a passion for. It’s not about necessarily being the best, rising through the ranks, getting sponsored, going pro, or even meeting goals. It’s about giving your best no matter how good you are, and most importantly, using your God-given gifts and passions as a means to reach out and make a difference, even if that is as seemingly small as a cup of coffee.Kitted up, I got myself out into the cold, grabbed my bike off the rack after a quick lookover, and rolled over to the side of the course to simultaneously warm up and watch the end of the pro women’s race. As I rolled into the starting grid, my mom handed me my phone so that I could see an inspiration good-luck text from Becca, my girlfriend who was back in Blacksburg, Virginia.  If I wasn’t already on a caffeinated, emotional and spiritual high, I was now.Wearing the 99 number, starting on the very last row, the gun finally went off. That race was the fastest I had ever entered, by a long shot. It was a night of cowbell filled, hand-up taken, adrenaline pumping cross racing. There were more cheers for me than people I thought I knew in Cincinnati. I made up little ground out of the gate, botched a bunny-hop, tripped over the barriers the next lap, crashed on a straight away, and ultimately ended up getting lapped and pulled barely half way through the race.  And Sunday’s race, while I lasted until the last lap before being pulled, wasn’t much to write home about either.But that wasn’t the point.  The point was that it was a fantastic weekend that brought friends, family and complete strangers together over a shared passion. It was a weekend of pursuing dreams, heart to heart conversations, and making differences.So instead of a list of goals taped to my door, something else is there. The 99 bib number from that night in Cincinnati. For motivation, yes, but more to serve as a reminder of what I can use Cyclocross as.  It’s a reminder that there’s more to it than training to reach such and such goal. Just like any sport, any passion for that matter, it is a great means to spend quality time with family and friends, reach out to someone who has the same passion,  and hopefully make a difference in someone’s day, even if it is as seemingly small as a cup of coffee on a cold Cincinnati night.last_img read more

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Unbundled rule report sent to Supreme Court

first_img Unbundled rule report sent to Supreme Court Senior Editor A proposal to create a family court rule specifically allowing lawyers to provide unbundled services to clients in family law cases will be presented to the Supreme Court. The Bar Board of Governors, at its October 19 meeting in Boca Raton, approved all five findings and recommendations of the Unbundled Legal Services Special Committee. That includes asking the court to direct the Family Law Rules Committee to draft a rule that allows lawyers to provide limited and specific representation in court. “Unbundled is allowing a lawyer to perform a discrete task in the context of a larger legal issue or case,” said board member Sharon Langer, who chaired the Unbundled Legal Services Special Committee. “What we’re really talking about is limited representation.” The committee, she said, received a variety of input, including a proposed family court rule and recommendation from the Family Law Section. “We relied on the Family Law Section’s research and we agree there is a need for limited representation in family law matters,” Langer said. “We did not address any other rule changes.” The limited representation includes allowing lawyers to appear in court without undertaking the responsibility for the entire case from the client. Only two other states, Colorado and Arizona, allow limited representation and that does not extend to courtroom work, she said. The final conclusions of the committee, Langer said, are: •Acceptance of the Family Law Section’s investigation showing unbundled services are needed in family law matters. • No other section or committee indicated limited representation is needed in other legal areas, therefore the unbundled committee concluded none is needed at this time. • Florida Bar rules as drawn allow limited representation envisioned by the Family Law Section in its proposed rule. • Proposed Family Law Rule 12.040(d) should be addressed to ensure it conforms with candor-to-the-tribunal requirements in Rule 4-3.3. • The Supreme Court should instruct the Family Law Rules Committee to draft a rule that specifically addresses limited representation in court. Langer noted that the Supreme Court has expressed interest in finding more ways to improve access to the courts, including specifically with unbundled services. She added, “I think the unanimous report that we bring to you today comes with some very intellectual and studied individuals feeling this is the way the Bar needs to go at this time.” Michael Gora, a member of the unbundled committee told the board the rule is needed to “increase the ability to deliver legal services in as many forms as possible to allow as many people as possible to access legal services. I believe it is a benefit to the legal system; I believe it is a benefit to our customers.” Board member Arthur Rice asked if the board passing the report to the Supreme Court meant it was an endorsement with no chance for further consideration. “All we’re asking is for the court to ask the Family Court Rules Committee to draft a rule,” Bar President Terry Russell replied. “I think we’ll have more than adequate opportunity in the future to review the consequences of the rule.” Langer recounted that the Unbundled Legal Services Special Committee was formed by the Bar in response to a directive from the Supreme Court to investigate unbundled services. The committee got a proposed rule from the Family Law Section and heard from several other sections which said they had no objections to unbundled services. The committee prepared and published preliminary proposals, which drew concerns from the Young Lawyers Division Board of Governors. The committee added two members from the YLD in response and substantially revamped its proposals for the final report, she said. November 1, 2001 Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Regular News Unbundled rule report sent to Supreme Courtlast_img read more

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