Staring Straight At The Lion’s Eye-mobile

first_imgHome of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Subscribe Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Top of the News Community News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Make a comment Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website center_img Business News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Community News HerbeautyBaby Boom: The Stars Are Getting Busy In QuarantineHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Trends To Look Like A Bombshell And 6 To Forget AboutHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Fashion Tips Are Making Tall Girls The Talk Of The TownHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty11 Signs Your Perfectionism Has Gotten Out Of ControlHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeauty More Cool Stuff 9 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it First Heatwave Expected Next Week The gift of sight is one to be cherished and taken care of. All we need to do is see and appreciate its value.Blair Health Academy, together with Men Educating Men About Health (MEMAH), aims to educate the young people on the basics and importance of eye health with the Lions Club’s Eyemobile.The partnership was formed when “we were contacted by MEMAH and asked if we were interested in a partnership and of course we jumped on the opportunity,” says Debbie Curtin, director of the Blair Health Careers Academy.Courtain tells us how “this kind of opportunity, gets our students a chance to be trained and exposed to health professionals, how to work with patients and clients.”The Lions International Eyemobile, is a “a van that’s totally equipped with eye and hearing equipment,” says Curtin.An optometrist and audiologist volunteers their services while students help them by “organizing the patients, taking the patients’ histories and doing the initial eye exam, and then filtering the patients into the eye doctor and the hearing where they do the actual test. The patient would come out of the bus and we would do any referral that the doctor’s recommended,” says Curtin.For the high school students, it is a chance to have them involved in community service. This is important for them, Curtin says, because “all colleges and employers want to look and see what these kids get back to the community before they take them in.”The students will also get to learn the “soft skills which would employ ability skills like customer service, patient care, communication, technical fields, etc.,” Curtin explains.Also, Curtin adds, the students “can use these hours towards their internship. They need to complete 180-hour internship in the health field and so that also helps them to be employable and helps colleges, universities to look at them because they have a little bit more than the average student would have.”The eyemobile is part of the Pasadena Host Lions International, and the students are part of the Leo Club, “which is like the baby Lions,” says Curtin. So in a way, these students are being mentored by the Lions Host by providing the eyemobile and the opportunity to hone and sharpen their skills in health care.To learn about the Pasadena Host Lions Club, visit http://www.pasadenahostlions.org for more information.For more on Blair High School, located at 1201 South Marengo Ave., visit http://blair.pasadenausd.org.Discover what MEMAH is all about by visiting http://memah.org. Health Staring Straight At The Lion’s Eye-mobile The Blair Health Academy, together with MEMAH, bring the Pasadena Host Lions Club Eyemobile By FRANZ A.D. MORALES Published on Tuesday, June 4, 2013 | 12:38 pmlast_img read more

Continue reading

OSKA Celebrates its 2nd Year with NAMI

first_imgcenter column 1 OSKA Celebrates its 2nd Year with NAMI Celebrating its 2nd anniversary, OSKA invites everyone to an event to honor Michael DiPaolo and help the NAMI (National Association for Mental Illness) By FRANZ A.D. MORALES Published on Friday, September 6, 2013 | 4:27 pm Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Subscribe Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Community News 8 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Make a comment Business News Community Newscenter_img Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  When retail stores celebrate anniversaries, it’s usually done with a big sale that celebrates fashion. But for OSKA‘s celebration, it honors good people and benefits worthy causes.On Sunday September 8, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m., OSKA will be having its 2nd anniversary celebration with a private party and silent auction. The event will also honor clinical psychologist Michael DiPaolo, Ph.D. and president of the National Association for Mental Illness (NAMI), recipient of the proceeds from the event.“It’s our second year of OSKA here in Pasadena, so we’re going to have a big anniversary cake, spirits, appetizers and there’s going to be an amazing silent auction of really great things,” says Annie Frank of OSKA. “The silent auction includes paintings by Robert Brandy which are hanging on our walls in the store, art donated by local artists, a catered dinner for six served up at the winner’s home by an Italian chef, and much more”In conjunction with the OSKA celebration, NAMI will be honoring DiPaolo for all the good work he has poured into the organization.Danielle Kurz of NAMI explains, “we’re going to have a series of lectures for Dr. Di Paolo. I was thinking it will be nice to have a party for him and try to have the clients of OSKA know ‘What is NAMI?’” Kurz feels not much is known about NAMI and the OSKA event will be a good springboard to introduce the nonprofit.As for OSKA, “What we’re going to do is sell as much as possible and donate back part of the proceeds to NAMI. They are a great organization and with a lot of the military coming home, there’s going to be a lot of need for the services they provide. They also help the homeless here in town, as well. It’s outstanding what they do. It’s an amazing organization,” says Frank.Most of the people involved with NAMI are volunteers, according to Kurz, so the nonprofit is trying to raise as much money as it can to help families in crises within the San Gabriel Valley. Aside from the financial help it would receive, Kurz hopes that NAMI could start to make noise and be recognized and supported by more people.The event will be held at OSKA, 13 Douglas Alley, Old Pasadena (near Il Fornaio Restaurant).To find out more about the event, you may call OSKA Pasadena at (626) 432-1729 or check out http://www.oska-pasadena.com.For more information about NAMI, you may call the NAMI office at (626) 577-6697 or visit http://www.namisangabrielvalley.org/. More Cool Stuff Top of the News HerbeautyIt Works Great If Weight Loss Is What You’re Looking For!HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Real Truth About The Pain Caused By MicrobladingHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Normal To Date Your BFF’s Ex?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou’ll Want To Get Married Twice Or Even More Just To Put Them OnHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyGained Back All The Weight You Lost?HerbeautyHerbeauty Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday First Heatwave Expected Next Week last_img read more

Continue reading

50 Years Ago: The First Look at a Dry Mars

first_img Guido Münch in a 1967 portrait on his election to the National Academy of Sciences. Credit: James McClanahanIn 1964, Caltech astronomy professor Guido Münch and Jet Propulsion Laboratory space scientists Lewis Kaplan and Hyron Spinrad pushed the world’s second-largest telescope to its limits and dashed—at least for the next few decades—any hopes of finding liquid water on Mars.Back in the late 1800s, it was widely assumed that Mars was a planet with abundant water, just like Earth. Astronomers were mapping Mars’s polar caps, which advanced and retreated as the seasons changed; a dark “wave,” apparently of vegetation, which swept from the pole toward the equator every spring; and even ruler-straight lines that might have been canals dug by an alien civilization. Today, we know that the ice caps grow larger because the winters are cold enough to freeze carbon dioxide right out of Mars’s thin air; the seasonal darkening is a wind-driven redistribution of the dust that blankets the planet; and the canals were optical illusions enhanced by wishful thinking.The notion of a moist Mars began to evaporate at the turn of the 20th century. In 1909, Lick Observatory dispatched a team of astronomers to climb Mount Whitney—whose summit, at 14,500 feet, rises above some four-fifths of Earth’s atmospheric water vapor. Pointing a small telescope at Mars, the team measured no water vapor in excess of that in the rarefied air around them, although observatory director William Wallace Campbell cautioned the Associated Press that their technique, “the only method known, is not a sensitive one.” Campbell diplomatically noted that “the question of life under these conditions is the biologist’s problem rather than the astronomer’s.”Bigger telescopes make for more sensitive measurements, and by the 1920s the world’s largest telescopes were just north of Pasadena at the Mount Wilson Observatory. In 1926, observatory director Walter Adams and Charles St. John wrote in the Astrophysical Journal that “the quantity of water-vapor in the atmosphere of Mars, area for area, was 6 per cent of that over Mount Wilson . . . This indicates extreme desert conditions over the greater portion of the Martian hemisphere toward us at the time.” The 60-inch telescope they used was second in size and power only to the adjacent 100-inch Hooker telescope, with which Adams revisited the question in 1937 and 1939 and revised his figures downward. In 1941 he wrote, “If water vapor lines are present . . . they cannot be more than 5 per cent as strong as in the earth’s atmosphere and are probably very much less.”The “lines” Adams referred to are spectral ones. The spectrum of light contains all the colors of the rainbow, plus wavelengths beyond, that we can’t see. Every gas in the atmosphere—both Earth’s and Mars’s—absorbs a specific collection of these colors. Passing the light from a telescope through a device called a spectrograph spreads out the rainbow and reveals the missing wavelengths, allowing the gases that absorbed them to be identified.In those days, spectra were usually recorded as shades of gray on glass plates coated with a light-sensitive emulsion—essentially the same technique photographer Matthew Brady had used to document the Civil War. Once the plates were developed, the missing wavelengths showed up as black lines that were painstakingly analyzed under a microscope. Each line’s location indicated its wavelength, while its darkness and thickness were related to the absorber’s abundance. And therein lay the problem: the wide, black blots left on the plate by Earth’s dense blanket of air made the thin, faint lines from the tenuous atmosphere of Mars hard to see, let alone measure. The best opportunities to find the lines occur at approximately two-year intervals. Earth travels in a tighter orbit around the sun than Mars does, and as we pass Mars on the inside track our close approach maximizes the apparent difference in our velocities. This shifts Mars’s spectrum ever so slightly away from Earth’s—if you have an instrument powerful enough to discern the separation.Unfortunately, some passes are closer than others. When Earth overtook Mars in 1963, the latter was at the point in its orbit most distant from the sun. Although the two planets were as close to each other as they were going to get that time around, the velocity effect was minimized—imagine looking out the window of a moving train at a distant farmhouse instead of the nearby telephone poles. But the Hooker’s spectrograph had recently been upgraded; Kaplan and Spinrad were expert spectroscopists; and Münch was a wizard at making very sensitive emulsions, so the trio decided to look for the lines anyway. With little prospect for success, the experiment was allotted a set of low-value nights that began more than two months after Earth had passed Mars and started to pull ahead. At its closest approach, Mars had been 62,000,000 miles away; by the time Münch and company got their turn at the telescope, that distance had nearly doubled. Their telescope was no longer the best available, having been overtaken as the world’s largest by the 200-inch Hale telescope at Caltech’s Palomar Observatory. Even the weather conspired against them; four nights of work yielded exactly one usable exposure.But as Münch wrote in the January 1964 issue of the Astrophysical Journal, that “strongly hypersensitized” plate gave “a spectrogram of excellent quality which shows faint but unmistakable lines which have been ascribed to H20 in Mars’ atmosphere . . . After comparing our plate with other ones found in the Mount Wilson files, we have convinced ourselves that ours is the spectrogram of Mars with the highest resolving power ever taken.”Even so, the lines were barely strong enough to be usable. The preliminary water-vapor calculation, announced in May 1963, had an error factor of 10. It would take another six months to work out the definitive number—a figure equivalent to 0.01 ± 0.006 per cent of the amount of water vapor over Mount Wilson, and 100 times less than the 6 percent Adams and St. John had referred to as “extreme desert conditions” 40 years earlier. Furthermore, a slightly stronger carbon dioxide line enabled a direct estimate of Mars’s atmospheric pressure: 25 millibars (2.5 percent of Earth’s surface pressure)—one-quarter of the best previous estimates. (Munch and his collaborators noted in passing that although their value for carbon dioxide was not itself surprising, “what would appear indeed surprising is that the . . . value for the atmospheric pressure [is] so low that CO2 itself becomes a major constituent”—entirely unlike Earth, where nitrogen and oxygen make up 99 percent of the air we breathe.) Based on these results, Mars was now officially as arid as the moon, and nearly as airless.Confirmation would follow in 1965, when JPL’s Mariner 4 became the first spacecraft to visit Mars. The behavior of Mariner’s radio signal as the spacecraft passed behind Mars revealed that its actual atmospheric pressure was lower still: 5 to 9 millibars, or less than 1 percent of Earth’s. And the 20 televised pictures of Mars’s cratered, moonlike surface—some shot from as little as 6,000 miles above it—cemented the comparison.Professor of Physics Robert Leighton (BS ’41, MS ’44, PhD ’47), who had been the principal investigator on Mariner 4’s Television Experiment, as it was called, and Associate Professor of Planetary Science Bruce Murray, a member of the TV team, would use Münch’s and Mariner’s data as cross-checks on a detailed thermal model of Mars that they wrote for Caltech’s IBM 7094 mainframe computer—a pioneering feat in its own right. Their results, published in 1966, correctly predicted that most of Mars’s carbon dioxide was actually not in the atmosphere, but instead lay locked up in the polar caps in the form of dry ice; the paper also made the unprecedented suggestion that seasonal advance of each polar cap would freeze out so much carbon dioxide that the atmospheric pressure would drop by as much as 20 percent twice every Mars year. These predictions have since been confirmed many times over, and form part of our basic understanding of how Mars works.And what of water on present-day Mars, which is where this story began? Leighton and Murray wrote that “considerable quantities of water-ice permafrost may be present in the subsurface of the polar regions” just a few tens of centimeters down—permafrost that was finally discovered in 2002 by JPL’s Mars Odyssey mission.See more at: http://www.caltech.edu/content/50-years-ago-first-look-dry-mars#sthash.TlkAy65n.dpuf Science and Technology 50 Years Ago: The First Look at a Dry Mars By DOUGLAS SMITH Published on Thursday, May 8, 2014 | 11:00 am Make a comment EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Top of the News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes HerbeautyThese Are 15 Great Style Tips From Asian WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAmazing Sparks Of On-Screen Chemistry From The 90-sHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWeird Types Of Massage Not Everyone Dares To TryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeauty Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Community News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Business Newscenter_img First Heatwave Expected Next Week Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Community News 6 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * More Cool Stuff Subscribe Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

Continue reading

Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA to Host Spay/Neuter Day for Feral Cats

first_img More Cool Stuff Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. 3 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Community News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Business News Community News Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA to Host Spay/Neuter Day for Feral Cats From STAFF REPORTS Published on Wednesday, October 7, 2015 | 1:17 pm faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes First Heatwave Expected Next Week center_img Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Make a comment Community News On October 15 and 16, the Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA (PHS) will hold a no-cost spay and neuter clinic for feral cats residing in the shelter’s nine service cities. This event is being held in honor of National Feral Cat Day, which is October 16.Feral cats are free-roaming cats that are not socialized to people. They are the same species as pet cats, but often live in outdoor cat colonies with limited human interaction. If left unaltered, these cats produce large numbers of kittens each spring and summer, inundating local animal shelters.The sterilization process for feral cats is commonly referred to as trap-neuter-return (TNR). Members of the community humanely trap feral cats, have them sterilized at a spay/neuter clinic, and then return the cats to their original location. While under anesthesia feral cats are also vaccinated and ear-tipped (a small part of the cat’s left ear is removed to indicate sterilization).“Female cats can have as many as three litters a year, and kittens can breed as young as four months old,” says Steve McNall, president/CEO of the Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA. “Most people don’t want to see the cats they’re feeding get pregnant over and over again, so our National Feral Cat Day ‘TNR-a-thon’ will serve as a gentle reminder to caretakers of free-roaming cat colonies to catch and sterilize their cats.”The PHS low-cost public spay and neuter clinic (SNiP) will dedicate October 15 and 16 exclusively to the spay and neuter of feral cats. The clinic expects to book 20 feral cat surgeries each day. A limited number of TNR appointments are also available weekly, Tuesday through Friday.TNR appointments at the SNiP Clinic include free spay/neuter surgery, vaccinations (FVRCP and rabies) and ear-tipping for feral cats throughout our service cities only: Arcadia, Bradbury, Glendale, La Cañada Flintridge, Monrovia, Pasadena, South Pasadena, San Marino and Sierra Madre. Additional services such as FeLV/FIV testing, flea treatment and microchipping are available upon request for an additional cost. A small inventory of humane traps are also available to rent for a deposit of $55, which is fully refunded upon return of the traps.TNR is by appointment only. To make an appointment, email [email protected] or call (626) 792-7151 ext. 166.About the Pasadena Humane Society & SPCAThe Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA is an open door, community-funded center, which provides all animals a place where they receive a safe haven, care and respect. The agency provides essential animal welfare and control services for the cities of Arcadia, Bradbury, Glendale, La Cañada Flintridge, Monrovia, Pasadena, San Marino, Sierra Madre and South Pasadena. For more information, visit www.pasadenahumane.org. Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Subscribe HerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyPretty Or Not: 5 Things You Didn’t Know About BeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHere Is What Scientists Say Will Happen When You Eat AvocadosHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyShort On Time? 10-Minute Workouts Are Just What You NeedHerbeautyHerbeauty Top of the News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

Continue reading

Hillsides Selected to Lead Workforce Workshops for Los Angeles Youth

first_img Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Giving Back Hillsides Selected to Lead Workforce Workshops for Los Angeles Youth 48 Youth Successfully Pass and Earn Employment Certifications From STAFF REPORTS Published on Monday, March 14, 2016 | 4:07 pm Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Community News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Subscribe Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  First Heatwave Expected Next Week Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Top of the News center_img HerbeautyHere Is What Scientists Say Will Happen When You Eat AvocadosHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWeird Types Of Massage Not Everyone Dares To TryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty11 Signs Your Perfectionism Has Gotten Out Of ControlHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyJennifer Lopez And Alex Rodriguez’s Wedding DelayedHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Metabolism-Boosting Foods For Weight LossHerbeautyHerbeauty More Cool Stuff EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Business News YMO’s job developer Casswell Goodman, who led the workshops, with Krystal Lopez, who completed the training and has received a job offer from Starbucks.Hillsides Youth Moving On, a program for youth transitioning from foster care to adulthood, was selected to lead a workforce training workshop for 54 current and former foster youth from more than 10 Los Angeles County agencies. Forty-eight youth passed the five-week course in February, receiving two employment certifications and three college credit units.During the training, held at Los Angeles Trade Technical College on five consecutive Saturdays, the youth identified their career weaknesses and strengths, learned hard and soft skills that are essential in today’s job market, and participated in mock interviews. Youth who completed the training are certified as work-ready and are being matched to jobs that fit their goals.“Los Angeles has one of the highest youth unemployment rates in the nation, especially for youth in foster care,” said Hillsides Chief Executive Officer Joseph M. Costa. “Our YMO workforce program is seeking to combat this trend and taking the lead in creating employment opportunities for these youth throughout Los Angeles County.”The training, an unprecedented collaborative effort by the major foster youth agencies in Los Angeles County, was spurred by the iFoster Grocery Industry Initiative, which is seeking to prequalify youth formerly in foster care for jobs in the industry. The agencies that sent youth to the workforce training workshop included the Coalition for Responsible Community Development, the Opportunities for Youth Collaborative, the Alliance for Children’s Rights, the Guardian Scholars Program, Los Angeles City College, Hathaway-Sycamores, St. Anne’s, and Pacific Clinics.The workshop was timed perfectly to a huge Job Fair for youth, 100,000 Opportunities, held on February 11, at the Los Angeles Convention Center where companies were hiring qualified youth on the spot. Several of the youth who completed the training received job offers, including Krystal Lopez, who used to live in YMO’s affordable housing program. Lopez, who said that she found the mock interviewing portion of the job training the most valuable, was offered a job at Starbucks.The training was facilitated by YMO job developer Casswell Goodman with the assistance of YMO Youth Advocate Aurelio Mitjans. YMO was selected to lead the training due to its track record of success training and placing youth currently or formerly in foster care in jobs. The iFoster Grocery Industry Initiative was rolled out in the summer of 2015. iFoster asked several Los Angeles County agencies to send their “best and brightest” youth for prequalification workforce testing. The youth YMO sent tested at the highest levels and YMO also had the highest success rate in helping youth gain employment.The curriculum used was developed through a partnership between YMO and four other local agencies, the Transition-Aged Youth (TAY) Collaborative. The group formed in order to address the lack of workforce instructional tools tailored to the unique challenges and barriers of youth in foster care. With funding from The Hilton Foundation, and the Carl and Roberta Deutsch Foundation, the TAY Collaborative worked with Dr. Lauren Gates at the Columbia University School of Social Work to create and implement a new, innovative workforce training curriculum.The success of Hillsides YMO program is made possible by the support of many foundations, which include the Annenberg Foundation, All Saints Church Pasadena, The Angell Foundation, Bank of the West, California Community Foundation, Carl & Roberta Deutsch Foundation, the Charitable Foundation, Confidence Foundation, George Hoag Family Foundation, Lon V. Smith Foundation, Mozilo Family Foundation, Northrop Grumman Employees Charitable Organization, Pasadena Rotary, RGK Foundation, Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southern California, Sidney Stern Memorial Trust, TJX Foundation, U.S. Bank, and Walmart FoundationHillsides, founded in 1913 and headquartered in Pasadena, is a premier provider of child welfare services for children in foster care and families in crisis. It serves more than 6,200 children and families throughout Los Angeles County. For more information, please visit www.hillsides.org. 5 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Community News Make a commentlast_img read more

Continue reading

Pets of the Week at the Pasadena Humane Society

first_img Here are the Pets of the Week available for adoption at the Pasadena Humane Society this week: Pip (A375731) is a 2-year-old, spayed female, black Labrador retriever. When Pip came to PHS, she had a badly broken leg. Two months later, her leg is healed and Pip is looking for a forever home! This friendly gal starts wagging her tail the moment she sees you. She knows how to sit for a treat and walks well on a leash. Although her leg is no longer broken, Pip will need to be walked multiple times a day in order to rebuild muscle mass she lost due to her broken leg.The adoption fee for dogs is $125, which includes the spay or neuter surgery, microchip, and vaccinations.New adopters will receive a complimentary health-and-wellness exam from VCA Animal Hospitals, as well as a goody bag filled with information about how to care for your pet.Call the Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA at (626) 792-7151 to ask about A375731, or visit at 361 S. Raymond Ave. in Pasadena. Adoption hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday; and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.Pets may not be available for adoption and cannot be held for potential adopters by phone calls or email. Directions and photos of all pets can be found at pasadenahumane.org. Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Subscribe Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Business News Top of the News More Cool Stuff Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy center_img EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Community News Community News Make a comment Community News Pets of the Week at the Pasadena Humane Society From STAFF REPORTS Published on Tuesday, September 6, 2016 | 11:36 am Munchie (A404140) is a handsome, 3-year-old, neutered male, red tabby. He may be a bit shy at first, but after a few minutes he’ll chat up a storm with you. His previous owner told us that Munchie loves to be loved, which Munchie will gladly prove. Give him a little love and he will purr, rub, and roll on his side to show his appreciation. Munchie would like to find a quiet forever home where he will get lots of attention and a warm lap. Munchie is available for adoption at Pet Food Express, 320 S Lake Ave, Pasadena.The adoption fee for cats is $70, which includes the spay or neuter surgery, microchip, and vaccinations.New adopters will receive a complimentary health-and-wellness exam from VCA Animal Hospitals, as well as a goody bag filled with information about how to care for your pet.Call the Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA at (626) 792-7151 to ask about A404140, or visit at 361 S. Raymond Ave. in Pasadena. Adoption hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday; and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.Pets may not be available for adoption and cannot be held for potential adopters by phone calls or email. Directions and photos of all pets can be found at pasadenahumane.org. Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * First Heatwave Expected Next Week HerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWhat’s Your Zodiac Flower Sign?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA 74 Year Old Fitness Enthusiast Defies All Concept Of AgeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThis Trend Looks Kind Of Cool!HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautylast_img read more

Continue reading

The City of Pasadena Announces Support Resources for Businesses Impacted by COVID-19

first_img faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPasadena Water and PowerPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Make a comment EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Government The City of Pasadena Announces Support Resources for Businesses Impacted by COVID-19 Published on Friday, April 3, 2020 | 3:34 pm 62 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * The City of Pasadena has announced a number of resources available to assist Pasadena businesses and employees impacted by COVID-19.COVID-19 Employee Rights & Resources WebinarThe Foothill Workforce Development Board (FWDB) will host a webinar on Monday, April 6, 2020 at 1 PM to help Pasadena workers impacted by COVID-19. Whether you have questions about unemployment and health insurance or financial and job services, this webinar will afford you the opportunity to ask questions and get on-the-spot answers to your questions. To participate, go to https://zoom.us/j/6967524809. Dial-In Option: 1-669-900-6833 (US Toll) or 1-696-752-4809 (US Toll). Meeting ID: 696 752 4809.Understanding Relief Funds For Businesses Impacted By COVID-19The Pasadena Small Business Development Center will host a webinar on Tuesday, April 7, 2020 at 11 AM to help Pasadena businesses and employers impacted by COVID-19. This webinar will provide a helpful overview to Pasadena business owners on relief funding available under the CARES Act. To participate, go to https://cccconfer.zoom.us/j/379302553. Dial-In Option: 1-669-900-6833 (US Toll) or 1-346-248-7799 (US Toll). Meeting ID: 379302553.The City of Pasadena website contains helpful information and resources for businesses impacted by COVID-19. The website contains information about relief options as well as resources for employers and employees. The COVID-19 Information for Businesses webpage is regularly updated and can be accessed here: https://www.cityofpasadena.net/economicdevelopment/covid-19-business-resources/.Beginning today, California small businesses impacted by the COVID-19 crisis can apply for a Paycheck Protection Program loan from the federal government for up to $10 million. The program is first-come, first-serve and eligible Pasadena businesses are encouraged to contact their lender to learn more. Information about the CARES Act can be accessed here: https://www.sba.gov/funding-programs/loans/coronavirus-relief-options .In addition to the above resources, the Pasadena City Council approved a moratorium on evictions for nonpayment of rent by tenants experiencing financial impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic. The City has developed a list of Frequently Asked Questions to assist the community in understanding the tenant protection moratorium. Those FAQ’s can be accessed here: https://www.cityofpasadena.net/wp-content/uploads/COVID19-Eviction-Moratorium-FAQs.pdf?v=1585986455924. Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Community News HerbeautyA Mental Health Chatbot Which Helps People With DepressionHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAncient Beauty Remedies From India To Swear By For Healthy SkinHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Reasons Why The Lost Kilos Are Regained AgainHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyRed Meat Is Dangerous And Here Is The ProofHerbeautyHerbeautycenter_img Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Business News Subscribe Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Community News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Top of the News First Heatwave Expected Next Week More Cool Stufflast_img read more

Continue reading

Pasadena Minimum Wage Increase Takes Effect

first_imgHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWomen Love These Great Tips To Making Your Teeth Look WhiterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyKeep Your Skin Flawless With These Indian Beauty RemediesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Trends To Look Like A Bombshell And 6 To Forget AboutHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHere Is What Scientists Say Will Happen When You Eat AvocadosHerbeautyHerbeauty Top of the News Countless Pasadenans are set to get a raise Wednesday as the city’s minimum wage increases to $15 per hour for larger businesses and $14.25 per hour for smaller ones.The increase has been in the works for years, and the schedule was set long before a virus that would become known as SARS-Cov-2, or the novel coronavirus, emerged and encircled the globe.The wage increase was divided into two steps, with different wages depending on the number of workers employed by a business.The minimum rate for Pasadena businesses with 26 or more employees rose to $14.25 per hour on July 1, 2019. The wage for businesses with 25 or less employees was raised to $13.25.As of Wednesday, all businesses in the city with 26 or more workers must pay them at least $15 per hour, while smaller businesses are required to provide a $14.25 per hour minimum wage.Businesses have approached the city and urged officials to hold off on the increase due to the economic hardship brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic in recent months, and activists have countered that the increase is vital for workers. The plan was not altered.California’s minimum wage is on a similar, but slower, trajectory. Larger companies will be required to pay employees at least $15 per hour by Jan. 1, 2022, while smaller businesses are required to pay a $15 per hour minimum wage by Jan. 1, 2023.Mayor Terry Tornek said he supports the increase and does not agree with calls to roll it back due to the pandemic.“I think from business to business, the, the difference between the current wage and what’s supposed to happen July 1st certainly would make a difference for all of them. I don’t know that it’s the definitive difference,” Tornek said in an interview last month.“We were getting a lot of pressure to roll that back long before the COVID crisis hit. And, frankly, to try to help the businesses is laudable, but to help (them) on the backs of the people who earn the least in our workforce is not the way to go.”Tornek said the commonly-held idea that minimum wage positions are only starting positions is false.“For a lot of people, this is the way that they earn. They don’t get beyond the minimum wage and they are trying to get by,” the mayor said. “It’s the lion’s share of people who (will be) earning $15. The starter wage thing is just not true.”The decision to increase the city’s minimum wage was done with a great deal of community input and research.“I insisted that we should wait for the city of Los Angeles and the County of Los Angeles to act so that we wouldn’t be isolated and on our own,” he said. Once the minimum wage was increased in the city of L.A. and unincorporated county areas, the timing was right for Pasadena to act.Not everyone is on board with the plan.Chamber of Commerce President Paul Little said it’s not a good move, especially amid the current economic climate, and could lead to increased job loss.“No one is ready for increased costs of any kind,” he said.Too many businesses are struggling to survive to afford the increased expense, he said. “Right now, every dollar that goes out is a dollar not being used to support businesses that are teetering on insolvency and closure,” Little said.“Unfortunately, for most small businesses the only way to offset increased costs is through the only line item on their balance sheet that has any give — employee costs,” he said.“I am afraid we will see more of what has happened since the city council raised the minimum wage the first time — a loss of jobs and a limiting of employment opportunities for the very people the increase was intended to help-minimum wage workers,” according to Little.Tornek said he was not unsympathetic to the struggles of local businesses.“Now we have a crisis and businesses are going under and some of them are not going to come back. And so they’re desperate for some relief,” he said. “And if we can give them some kind of relief, we should do it.The city has already rebated underground utility tax money to businesses, and further ways to help them are under consideration, including raising both public and private funds to help subsidize businesses, Tornek said.But halting or reversing the minimum wage increase is tantamount to “asking the workers, the lowest-wage workers, to make that contribution. And I don’t think it’s fair,” he said. Business News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * 24 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS More Cool Stuff Community News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m.center_img STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week Make a comment Community News Subscribe faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPasadena Water and PowerPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Government Pasadena Minimum Wage Increase Takes Effect By BRIAN DAY and DAVID CROSS Published on Tuesday, June 30, 2020 | 1:32 pm Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

Continue reading

Guest Opinion | James De Pietro: “We Should Expect More of our City Commissions”

first_imgOpinion & Columnists Guest Opinion | James De Pietro: “We Should Expect More of our City Commissions” By JAMES DE PIETRO Published on Thursday, July 30, 2020 | 2:18 pm 84 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena More Cool Stuff At the end of June, via Zoom, Pasadena’s Transportation Advisory Commission or “TAC” held its first meeting in five months due to the Covid-19 pandemic that has affected so many lives in our community. In addition to being TAC’s first virtually held meeting, it was also my last as a member, having served as the District 7 representative since 2013.While proud of my time on TAC, the past several months have provided some critical distance and strengthened my view that our city commissions are invaluable resources that are undervalued and underutilized. Furthermore, I believe that Pasadena and our City Council should use our commissions to further engage with the public and develop and vet policies that affect every corner of our city.Pasadena has more commissions, committees, and boards than its neighbors because they all serve a critical function – community participation with knowledgeable and informed members of the public. These commissions help advance diverse issues such as arts and culture, planning, accessibility and disability, the status of women, and now potentially police oversight.During my time on TAC, I had the privilege to serve alongside transportation engineers, affordable housing developers, community organizers, and a retired bus driver, to name just a few. Other than our dedicated city staff, few know these complicated issues better than these commissioners because they bring both their professional expertise and real-life experience. Because of their unique qualifications, we should expect more from our commissions because of the unique position they play in serving both the public and the City Council.One of the most controversial issues that arose during my time on TAC was the proposed construction of a road diet along Orange Grove Boulevard. This plan would have reduced the number of vehicle travel lanes as well as created a center-left turn lane with buffered bike lanes. Because departments did not develop an adequate public outreach strategy and leverage the knowledge of our commissions, the situation has become a case study in how well-intentioned government objectives and community group interests do not always align. The lasting effects have included the erosion of public trust and an increase in public division.In the case of Orange Grove Boulevard, TAC or other city commissions could have interfaced with the City Council and department staff earlier so that they could have played a more constructive role. Our commissions could have dedicated meetings to provide both City departments and the public the opportunity to evaluate plans and express their support or opposition. By doing so, commissioners could have helped ease tensions by listening and aiding in the development of a thoughtful community-based compromise that benefited most interests and assisted the work of the Departments of Public Works and Transportation and the City Council.As a city, we are facing significant health and economic challenges. When we ask so much of our elected officials and our tireless public servants, we need to acknowledge that they are sometimes under-resourced from both a personnel and informational standpoint. To expect our City Council and Pasadena employees to do everything is unrealistic and unfair. However, with some changes to how we utilize our Commissions, they can help alleviate this strain by bridging the gap between the government and the public.Like many other commissions, TAC operates as an advisory body to the City Council and its expressed purpose is to discuss, analyze, evaluate, and make policy recommendations. But far too often commissions are brought into discussions too late to make substantive impacts. The result is that they are relegated to a more reactive and isolated role than a proactive and visible one and thus operate more like islands than part of an integrated system.Therefore, a proposed solution is to empower commissions to develop regular and actionable policy recommendations to the City Council. The first step toward this objective is for our commissions to hold additional meetings and not just in one location, but across the city, so that they can hear the diverse opinions of our residents, businesses, and visitors.When I look back at my time on TAC, I am incredibly proud of its work, such as updating transportation metrics from level of service (LOS) to vehicle miles traveled (VTS) and advocating for more significant funding for alternative transportation infrastructure. However, TAC often worked without public input because our meetings were not easily accessible, and because we did not prioritize community outreach, and this should not be the case.Every person who has served on a commission knows that there are limits, rules of operating, and systems to protect the public, city departments, and the City Council. These are essential checks on balancing power, and non-elected commissions need to be careful and considerate not to overstep their authority or burden city staff. Keeping these considerations in mind, however, commissions can and should play a more significant part in shaping Pasadena into the place we want it to be.Going forward, I believe that there are two things that, as a city, we should consider. First, the City Council should fully take advantage of our commissions by assigning them more responsibility and providing them with additional autonomy to explore issues so that they can actively participate in policy recommendations.And second, commissioners should demonstrate greater leadership in the community. Aptly positioned, commissioners should use their time of service to promote issues, call for action, communicate and educate others, and bring additional voices and diverse viewpoints into the process.Pasadena has so many public commissions because it highly values community involvement and the free and respectful exchange of ideas. Accordingly, we need to update the role of our commissions now so that they can act in an effective, engaging and approachable way.James De Pietro represented District 7 as a member of the City of Pasadena’s Transportation Advisory Commission from 2013 to 2020 and served as its Vice Chair and Chair during his tenure. He lives and works in Pasadena. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week Community News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Top of the News center_img Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Community News Herbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Are 15 Great Style Tips From Asian WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyBohemian Summer: How To Wear The Boho Trend RightHerbeautyHerbeauty Make a comment Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Business News Subscribelast_img read more

Continue reading

Pasadena Literary Alliance to Resume In-Person Events

first_img STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Business News Pasadena Literary Alliance’s previous years’ Festival of Women Authors courtesy photoFollowing a successful year of online activities, the Pasadena Literary Alliance is looking forward to resuming in-person author discussions and other events in the coming months as the organization turns another chapter, representatives said.The group has long run a series of panel discussions with authors called Open Book, which transitioned to an online format and became Open Book On Location in May 2020 in response to the pandemic. They produced 13 monthly videos.“Our sort of special sauce for that program was to put together two or three authors that we thought wouldn’t have met each other before and to hear them talk to each other,” according to PLA Board of Directors Chair Katie Poole.The PLA’s other signature annual event, the Pasadena Festival of Women Authors, was also moved online for 2021, she said.But as restrictions gradually lift and the region sits on the verge of transitioning into the least restrictive “yellow” tier under the state’s reopening framework, and having enjoyed continued support from the community, real-life gatherings are once again on the horizon.“We have survived COVID,” Poole said. “We have, I would say, excelled in our outreach. We’ve continued to get the author interviews and to celebrate authors. That’s what we do.”An in-person Open Book event is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Oct. 19 at NOOR Events in Pasadena with authors Attica Locke and Rachel Howell Hill, Poole said.The PLA was also planning to host next year’s Pasadena Festival of Women Authors at the Pasadena Convention Center on Feb. 19.More details on both events were to follow. It had not yet been determined whether the online Open Book On Location series would continue.Additionally, Poole said, “We’re just so happy that we’ve been able to keep up our granting. We had to take a break last spring, but we’ll be able to do our grants this spring. And I think that that has spoken really well to our financial management, to be able to continue with our granting.”PLA grants support community organizations including Pasadena City College, the Pasadena Senior Center, the Pasadena Public Library, PEN America and WriteGirl.Ticketed events, such as the Open Book series and the Pasadena Festival of Women Authors, are the PLA’s primary fundraisers, Poole explained.“We give money to a lot of different literary organizations and the way we raise the funds for that is by having ticketed events,” she said. “For 11, 12 years, we’ve averaged about $50,000 a year in grants. So when COVID came, we were challenged like every other nonprofit on how to have in-person ticketed events to raise our grant money.”The online programs created by the PLA were available for free, but donations of $25 were suggested.The Open Book On Location series can be accessed online at pasadenaliteraryalliance.org/open-book/open-book-on-location-episodes.The 2021 Pasadena Festival of Women Authors can be viewed at pasadenaliteraryalliance.org/pasadena-festival-of-women-authors. Community News CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday HerbeautyWhat’s Your Zodiac Flower Sign?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThis Trend Looks Kind Of Cool!HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Are 15 Great Style Tips From Asian WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAre You His Ms. Right? 12 Signs He Thinks You AreHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeauty 7 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week Subscribe Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Top of the News center_img Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Uncategorized Pasadena Literary Alliance to Resume In-Person Events By DAVID CROSS and BRIAN DAY Published on Monday, May 3, 2021 | 3:28 pm More Cool Stuff Make a comment Community News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimeslast_img read more

Continue reading