Things for single people to do on Valentine’s Day

first_imgReddIt Twitter Beth Griffith is a senior journalism major from Cleburne, Texas. She will commission as a 2LT Military Intelligence officer in the United States Army in May. In her free time, she is authoring a clean eating cook book and enjoys volunteering and boxing. IMAGE: Good Karma Fort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturday Beth Griffithhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/beth-griffith/ Facebook Twitter Comin’ Up: saying goodbye to the gang life 6. Do something classic … like a haunted house. Courtesy of giphy.comFew things scream “Valentine’s Day” like actual screams. Grab a group of friends and check out Cutting Edge Haunted House. It’s everything a single person could ask for on the day of love: terror, laughs, cries. It’ll be a great non-traditional way to spend your evening. Beth Griffithhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/beth-griffith/ Facebook + posts TAGSFun timesfunnygifs on gifsSingleValentine’s Day Beth Griffithhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/beth-griffith/ printNothing makes being single seem painful quite like Valentine’s day. But, being alone on Valentine’s day doesn’t have to be awful. In fact, here’s some things you can do to make the day great.1. Treat yo’  self Spend the day doing what your nonexistent lover would do for you. Go to one of the many spas around town like Perfect Touch Day Spa or Mokara Spa at the Omni and treat yourself to a massage or a facial. Enjoy a day celebrating you, because you deserve it. Previous articleDevelopment plan revealed for Berry/University, some express oppositionNext articleDiverse group of students celebrates at TCU lunar festival Beth Griffith RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR 7. Be a tourist in your own city via GIPHYThink about it. The water gardens, the Stock Yards, going to ride a mechanical bull somewhere. All those stereotypical Texan things that you really want pictures doing but have never had the chance, here is your chance. Grab a group of friends, go out and do all those things you thought you would do when you moved to Texas but never actually did. Cowboy boots are encouraged but not required.8. Take care of your household chores Valentine’s Day falls on a Sunday this year, a day that is often reserved for catching up on all that laundry you didn’t do or all the dishes sitting in your sink. So you can do exactly that. Then when Monday morning rolls around you’ll have your full wardrobe at your disposal and a clean kitchen to brag about. Plus it may even make your life seem much more put together than it really is.via GIPHY9. Do absolutely nothing differentWhen it comes down to it, Valentine’s day is just like every other day. Treat it as such. Tomorrow will be just an ordinary Monday. You do you. 2. Have a partyCourtesy of giphy.comEverybody loves a good ol’ anti-Valentine’s Day party. Invite all your single friends over, stock up on the snacks and drinks and enjoy a night of pure unattached bliss at home. 3. Have a girl’s or guy’s night outGrab your crew, get dressed up in your favorite outfit and hit the club. It’ll be full of single people, so if you’re feeling sappy and lonely, the odds are in your favor. Check out Varsity Tavern on 7th Street or catch a good jazz show at Scat Jazz Lounge downtown. Linkedin Ripple Effect: TCU professor talks gravitational waves Severe thunderstorms moving through Fort Worth 4. Get out of townTake all that money you’re saving by not buying someone a cheesy gift and date night and go on a trip. Take a couple of friends and take a cheap flight to Vegas (the single’s homeland) or drive down to Austin for the weekend. Have yourself a weekend to remember. Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Linkedin ReddIt Beth Griffithhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/beth-griffith/ Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store 5. Go to the moviesIf you have or haven’t seen it by Valentine’s day, go watch Deadpool. It’s the perfect flick to make you forget all about this day of love. Beth Griffith last_img read more

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Outstanding FWISD high school artists work on display

first_imgFort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturday Fort Worth ISD Superintendent Dr. Kent Scribner talked to families about education Saturday Simeon Joneshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/simeon-jones/ Middle school French teacher nominated for District Teacher of the Year Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store Simeon Jones ReddIt + posts Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Previous articleFor TCU students, pathway largely paved for landing internships, jobsNext articleTCU drops rubber match 3-1 to Texas Tech; Frogs lose 2nd straight Big 12 series Simeon Jones RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR ReddIt Facebook Twitter Linkedin Simeon Joneshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/simeon-jones/ Linkedin Twitter Facebook printThere were more than 4,000 submissions to the Annual Fort Worth ISD Secondary Schools Art Awards Night for High School Tuesday night.Students and parents explored the art exhibit in Billingsley Field House, taking pictures of the artwork on display and the prizes individuals won for their artwork.“Exceptional student artwork is selected for this exhibition and it is an honor which demonstrates special artistic talent,” Fort Worth ISD Director of Art EducationBeverly Fletcher said.Catherine Vest, a senior at Arlington Heights High School, took home the big prize as she won first place for her art portfolio. Vest won a $2,000 scholarship to go towards her college tuition as well as a trophy and ribbons.To win the top prize, a student must have had developed his or her artwork over four years and submitted his or her 12 best works of art in at least three mediums or more. The students also had to show improvement from freshman to senior year in order to show the judges their growth.Fletcher said over 100 submissions were sent for the art portfolio award and the judges chose the top 10. Four won trophies and two won scholarship money from their art portfolio.Vest said that for her, winning first place meant that people liked her art and that her hard work had paid off.“I was surprised because I don’t really think what will come out of it,” Vest said. “I just think about the piece and hope to see the end of it.”Vest said that when she initially found out she had won first place for her portfolio, she cried and needed to sit down to catch her breath.For every great artist there is a great inspiration that drives them. For Catherine, that inspiration comes from the Northwest Pacific.“My main inspiration for most of my pieces is the Northwest Pacific because of all the big trees and greenery,” Vest said.As for life after the awards show, Vest said that she plans to keep working on art.“I’m actually planning to go to college for it and probably get a master’s degree,” Vest said of her future plans.Beverly Fletcher has been apart of this art show for 25 years now and says one main reason she loves doing the art show is to honor and give awards to students who work really hard on their artwork all year long.“I feel that this art show is a very important part of art students’ life and can even be apart of their whole future in art,” Fletcher said.Over 500 awards were passed out to students from the Fort Worth area in different categories and divisions. This art show has been going on for more than 70 years awarding graduating high school students with scholarship money to help fund their college tuition and pursue their career in art.Fletcher talked about Sedrick Huckaby, a native of Fort Worth who won 1st place in the art portfolio division when he was a senior in high school.  Huckaby has since became a popular artist with his work going to be featured at the National Gallery in Washington D.C.Fletcher used this example to show how students can be impacted by this event and the famous artists that have come from this art show.“I have seen students that have been very positively affected by this event that started 70 plus years ago,” Fletcher said. “Through the Fort Worth ISD we can help students achieve greatness, achieve their dreams and follow their vision of success.”last_img read more

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Frogs soccer finish opening weekend with consecutive shutouts

first_imgWhat to watch during quarantine Facebook Frogs complete a strong opening weekend with early scoring and strong defense. I am the executive editor of TCU 360 from Raleigh, North Carolina. If you walk by my desk in the newsroom you’ll immediately know I’m Post Malone’s biggest fan. I’m always looking for a good story to tell! If you have any story ideas, feel free to reach out! Go Panthers! TCU wants ex-professor’s discrimination suit dismissed Previous articleHoroscope: August 21, 2017Next articleSolar eclipse livestream Robbie Vaglio RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter The College of Science and Engineering Dean, Phil Hartman, retires after 40 consecutive years ReddIt Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ Snow temporarily stepping down as honors dean Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ + posts Robbie Vaglio Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ Facebook Two students joined harassment and discrimination lawsuit against TCU TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history ReddIt printTCU soccer capped opening weekend with a second consecutive shutout victory, defeating the UTSA Roadrunners by a five goal margin.The Frogs’ second game of the season played out very similarly to the first. The Horned Frogs dominated possession for the second straight game and played strong defense. Over the weekend, TCU combined for 10 goals while only allowing four shots from the opposition.The first shot allowed by the Frogs came in the 23rd minute of today’s game.“They’re just going out and applying the information they’ve been given,” head coach Eric Bell said. “Over the couple of games we’ve played this season, we’ve continually gotten better, and that’s what it’s all about. Every time we step on the field, we’re giving ourselves a chance to get better.”The Horned Frogs came out strong in the first half, again, capitalizing twice in the early stages of the match.In the sixth minute, sophomore midfielder Tara Smith received a strong cross from senior defender Ryan Williams into the box and shot into the left corner of the goal. The goal marked Smith’s first career goal as a Horned Frog.Just two minutes later, the Frogs earned a corner kick. Senior forward Allison Ganter crossed the ball to the opposite end of the box where junior midfielder Karitas Tomasdottir jumped up to head the ball in over the keeper’s outstretched arms.In the 24th minute, senior forward Emma Heckendorn completed another cross from Williams between the legs of the keeper to give the Frogs a three goal lead. The goal marked Heckendorn’s first goal of the season.The final two goals of the match were scored by junior forward McKenzie Oliver. In the 32nd minute, Williams wove through the defense to lay the ball between two Roadrunner defenders into Oliver’s path who immediately pulled the shot into the bottom right corner of the net. In the 45th minute, freshman forward Tayla Christensen found Oliver on a breakaway. Oliver drew the defender left and shot the ball, just barely getting the ball over the goalkeeper’s arms and into the UTSA net.“I haven’t tallied too many goals over the past two seasons, so to start off the first weekend with two goals feels pretty great,” Oliver said.The match marked the second game played on the new field, and Oliver has noticed the major difference the new turf makes on the team’s overall play.“I love it,” Oliver said. “The elevation’s nice and it’s all flat. It’s a lot easier to play both ways.”Bell agreed that the new field is helping the team’s level of play.“The quality of the surface is great,” Bell said. “It’s a lot softer so there’s not as much wear and tear on your body, and when that’s combined with the kind of lighting we had on Friday night, it makes it into a venue where the quality of soccer can be really good.”The Frogs will look to continue the strong play on both ends of the field when they travel to Colorado next weekend. The Frogs will face the University of Colorado and Northern Colorado next Friday and Sunday night. World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Linkedin Twitter Linkedinlast_img read more

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Mr. and Ms. TCU winners reflect on the meaning behind the crown

first_imgFacebook Facebook printHorned Frogs will see a different kind of halftime show this week as the annual crowning of Mr. and Ms. TCU joins the festivities. TCU has honored two graduating seniors with this title since 1944. In recent years, honorees, who are chosen by their peers, have been recognized for efforts that have changed TCU and Fort Worth for the better.“We have focused more on student involvement in the community, which has really been a great way to see how these students are engaging with the TCU mission statement,” Brad Thompson, the assistant director of student activities said. “There are extraordinary students at TCU, and it is always so encouraging to me to meet them and for them to be recognized by their peers.”TCU student organizations nominated candidates last spring. Finalists were then chosen based on essays, resumes and a student body vote. Ten men and women will continue in this year’s selection process by participating in faculty and staff interviews, according to TCU’s Student Affairs website. Brandon Victorian, an electrical engineering major, is a Mr. TCU nominee. Victorian, who is involved in various programs at TCU, said he thinks he’s qualified for the award because of his campus involvement.“I’ve given so many different people a chance to get to know who I am, and that allows my more social side to show,” Victorian said. “I think winning it would be a huge honor, mostly because the winner is selected to embody what it means to be a TCU student.Michael Drake, a finance and entrepreneurial management double-major, is another nominee. Drake said winning would serve as a great way to see how he has impacted TCU .“It would mean so much,” Drake said. “I still think it is crazy that it is senior year. This school has provided opportunities to grow personally, professionally and I have been blessed with some of the best friends ever.” The 1979 recipient of Mr. TCU, which was named homecoming king, Michael Mckee, said he was elated and humbled when he won.“Being chosen as Homecoming King prompted an even deeper affection and appreciation for my alma mater,” Mckee said. “It was an enormous honor.”The rigor of the selection process didn’t deter the excitement for the 2009 recipient of Mr. TCU, Jimmy Hopper. “The process helped me to build relationships with administrators and professors at TCU,” Hopper said. “I loved my time there, and this was a pleasant surprise.”Elise Smith, Ms. TCU 2009, said winning meant a lot to her as a student and an alumna.“TCU does a wonderful job of acknowledging students that are passionate about this institution – it  further solidified that I was a valued member of the community,” Smith said.The 2007 winner of Mr. TCU, Cameron Sparks, said he was surprised by the student-driven selection process. “I was super grateful and humbled by the whole experience,” Sparks said. The fact that it is voted on by the student body made it that much more special.”Many past recipients said winning this award validates their hard work while they were at TCU.“I loved my time at TCU, and being named Mr. TCU was simply an extension of that love,” Brian Casebolt, the 2002 recipients of Mr. TCU, said. “My life was changed for the better by working alongside the many talented students, faculty, staff and alumni to make our local and global community.”“ Grace Amisshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/grace-amiss/ Twitter Linkedin Previous articleFamiliarity adds another layer to nationally televised showdownNext articleThe Skiff: October 19, 2017 Grace Amiss RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Grace Amiss Revamped enrollment process confuses some students Twitter Ms. TCU 1995 winner, Gina Rector. Grace Amisshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/grace-amiss/ Language barriers remain in TCU’s alert system Grace Amisshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/grace-amiss/ TCU cancels offer to trade tickets for canned food ReddIt + posts TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history ReddIt Flu activity remains high in Texas World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Grace Amiss is a senior journalism major and managing editor for TCU360. When she is not reporting she is most likely raving about her golden retriever or taking a spin class. Grace is currently writing about student life at TCU, so feel free to drop her a line if you come across a story you feel is worth sharing! Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Linkedin Grace Amisshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/grace-amiss/last_img read more

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Visitors ogle art at ArtsGoggle

first_imgLinkedin Twitter Fort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturday Erin Ratiganhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/erin-ratigan/ Website| + posts printMagnolia Avenue transformed into a bohemian marketplace Saturday, when roughly 800 artists from all walks of life and skillsets came together for ArtsGoggle, an annual arts festival.For 12 years the event has allowed artists to display and sell their creations, with arts styles ranging from paintings and illustrations to clothing and leather art. The show spanned 18 blocks from 8th Avenue to St. Louis Avenue, with food trucks and live music.ArtsGoggle featured booths from over 800 artists across the metroplex. (Photo by Erin Ratigan)Leaning over his large canvas, vendor Taylor King examined his work with deep concentration. Brush in hand, he made a red swipe down the center of his canvas. His subject was a woman singing into a microphone.“I have an intuition towards creating,” King said. “I’ve discovered it through my mistakes.”In 2011, after serving as a lance corporal in the Marines straight out of high school, King said he realized he had made a mistake not pursuing his true passion– painting. Now King is a full-time art student at Tarrant County College and has sold his paintings at ArtsGoggle for four years.Painter and TCC student Taylor King works on a painting of local band Panic Volcanic at ArtsGoggle Saturday. (Photo by Erin Ratigan)Instead of simply showing off his finished pieces, King said he wants to show the public how he works, with nearly every stage of the process performed live. The painting he worked on at the festival is a piece he’s been working on for days.“It’s in the doing – the journey is in the fun,” he said.Though trade was slow today, King held out hope to make more by the end of the night.“Usually paintings sell nearer the end of the event,” he said.Painter and TCC student Taylor King’s booth at ArtsGoggle Saturday. (Photo by Erin Ratigan)High school student Aaron Hutts’s booth featured drawings and illustrations, mostly in India ink. He described his style as “queer esthetic.”“A lot of these are inspired by life in general,” she said, gesturing to a green painting of a skull.Hutt’s friend Monica Stiffler was helping him run the stall. Stiffler said Hutt’s authenticity makes his art meaningful.“The cool part is every time he makes art he sits down and puts everything he’s feeling onto paper,” she said.High school student Aaron Hutts shows off his ArtsGoggle booth Saturday. Hurts sells drawings and illustrations on canvas, postcards and trading cards. (Photo by Erin Ratigan)Many Horned Frogs attended ArtsGoggle with TCU purple in every direction. Bill Cureton and ’08 alumnus Jeremy VanWinkle were among them and came in their football jerseys. They planned to attend the homecoming game later that day.Bill Cureton and ’08 alumnus Jeremy VanWinkle sport their TCU gear for Saturday’s homecoming football game Saturday. (Photo by Erin Ratigan)“They’ve been very informative,” Cureton said, referring to the artists he had met, “telling us how they make their stuff.”One their purchases was a TCU-themed pumpkin. Erin Ratigan is a Headliners Foundation scholar and contributor to the “Fort Worth Weekly” news publication. She is a journalism major, sociology minor, and arts enthusiast. Erin Ratigan Erin Ratiganhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/erin-ratigan/ Twitter Erin Ratiganhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/erin-ratigan/ TCU to host annual turkey giveaway ReddItcenter_img Erin Ratiganhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/erin-ratigan/ ReddIt “Man’s Best Friends” In Need at Fort Worth Animal Care and Control Shelter Residents “deck the halls” for the holidays Facebook Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Oh the places they’ll go: Seniors face challenges post-graduation Facebook Linkedin Previous articleNo. 4 TCU shuts down Kansas, 43-0Next articleFrogs fall to No. 8 WVU in Morgantown Erin Ratigan RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store last_img read more

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Construction set to begin on Amon G. Carter Stadium expansion

first_img Previous articleGoing, going, gone: Baker selected on Day One of MLB DraftNext articleFive Horned Frogs selected in 2018 MLB draft Benton McDonald RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Board approves tuition freeze, RRI actions but doesn’t act on eligibility issue spurred by Williams Benton McDonaldhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/benton-mcdonald/ Benton McDonaldhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/benton-mcdonald/ TCU rowing program strengthens after facing COVID-19 setbacks Linkedin Benton McDonald is a senior journalism and political science double major from Austin, Texas. He has worked for TCU360 since his freshman year and is currently the executive editor. Linkedin Twitter ReddIt Thousands of TCU community members receive COVID-19 vaccines as university supply increases Twitter Benton McDonaldhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/benton-mcdonald/ Benton McDonaldhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/benton-mcdonald/ Courtesy: GoFrogs.com Chancellor talks stimulus money, COVID-19 vaccines and more at limited attendance faculty town hall printConstruction is set to begin on the $100 million expansion of the premium seating at Amon G. Carter Stadium, TCU Director of Intercollegiate Athletics Jeremiah Donati announced Thursday.The upgrades, which will include 48 new boxes, two private clubs, more than 1,000 club seats and 22 luxury suites, are set to be completed by the 2019 football season.The side nearest TCU’s campus and Frog Alley will be receiving the upgrades seen in this rendering. Photo courtesy of TCU AthleticsThe project will also add an 100-foot outdoor balcony overlooking Frog Alley and the TCU campus, as well as a new video board in the north end zone.A rendering of how Amon G. Carter stadium will look after the newest renovations. Photo courtesy of TCU Athletics“This is more than just a football project,” Donati said. “This facility will be used to the benefit all 21 of our sports, our campus community and Fort Worth. It’s an appropriate expansion with all the cutting-edge technology, to what is already the finest football stadium in the country.”Donati also talked about how the fundraising for the project has attracted a new and younger group of donors, some of whom are donating to TCU for the first time.“Fundraising is ongoing but reached a financial threshold significant enough to begin construction,” he said. “Philanthropic support has been tremendous thus far.”In addition to upgrading the capacity of the stadium from 45,000 to 47,000, the project will include meeting spaces for corporate events, which will foster year-round use of the facility outside of football season.The new renovations will add meeting spaces and club areas to Amon G. Carter Stadium. Photo courtesy of GoFrogs.com“Our stadium expansion project will have a positive impact on our recruiting efforts, plus our fan experience,” TCU Head Football Coach Gary Patterson said. “This project will also further strengthen our university’s foundation going forward in the near future.” ReddIt Another series win lands TCU Baseball in the top 5, earns Sikes conference award Facebook Facebook Benton McDonald + posts Settlement reached between TCU, former professor in discrimination lawsuit TCU baseball finds their biggest fan just by saying hellolast_img read more

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Heisman winner, former TCU coach Pat Sullivan dies at 69

first_imgShooting from the hip: Curry’s impact felt in March Madness A look at the NCAA Tournament, ending with shot for the ages Facebook Music professor says Placido Domingo harassed her, grabbed her breast Photo courtesy of TCU Athletics. Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Associated Press Facebook + posts ReddIt Associated Presshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/associated-press/ World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Linkedincenter_img Linkedin Twitter Associated Presshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/associated-press/ TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history printBIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Pat Sullivan, the 1971 Heisman Trophy winner at Auburn who went on coach TCU and Samford, has died. He was 69.Sullivan’s family released a statement saying he “died peacefully at home” Sunday morning, surrounded by relatives. The former quarterback was diagnosed with throat cancer in 2003 and the statement said he “fought a long and difficult battle as a result of his treatments.”Sullivan was a College Football Hall of Famer who played four seasons with the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons, wrapping up his playing career in 1976 with the Washington Redskins and San Francisco 49ers. In this Saturday, Sept. 5, 2009, file photo, Samford head coach Pat Sullivan looks up at the scoreboard late in the second half of an NCAA college football game against Central Florida in Orlando, Fla. He was on the search committee when Auburn hired coach Gus Malzahn.“We are deeply saddened by the passing of Pat Sullivan, one of Auburn’s all-time greats on and off the field,” Malzahn said. “I will forever be indebted to Coach Sullivan for helping bring me back to Auburn to serve as the head football coach.“He was a friend, mentor and a man of great character who was beloved by many generations of Auburn fans.”Sullivan began coaching at Samford in 2007 and stepped down in December 2014, citing health issuesHe went on to serve as special advisor to the president for campus and community development.FILE – In this Dec. 2, 1971, file photo, Auburn quarterback Pat Sullivan poses with his Heisman Trophy. “Coaching is a grind. Right now I need more balance in my life,” Sullivan said in announcing his resignation. “I need to pay more attention to my health and I want to spend more time with (wife) Jean, my children and grandchildren. I owe that to them. But I’m not done working and I’m not leaving Samford.”He was TCU’s head coach from 1992-97 and then worked as UAB’s offensive coordinator before taking over at Samford. Sullivan was inducted into the Hall of Fame as a player in 1991.He entered the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame in 1981.“Pat Sullivan gave Samford all and more than we could have asked,” Samford President Andrew Westmoreland said. “His teams won games, his players persisted to earn degrees. By personal example, he led everyone closer to Christ and he brought honor to our university.”Sullivan led the nation in total offense as a junior in 1970, teaming up with wide receiver Terry Beasley to pass for 2,586 yards. He passed for 2,012 yards and a career-best 20 touchdowns as a senior, securing the Heisman with a 248-yard, four-touchdown performance against Georgia. Sullivan edged Cornell’s Ed Marinaro 1,597-1,445 in Heisman voting.FILE – In this Saturday, Nov. 19, 2011, file photo, Samford coach Pat Sullivan is recognized with wife Jean on the 40th anniversary of his winning the Heisman trophy as quarterback at Auburn, before an NCAA college football game between Samford and Auburn, in Auburn, Ala. Sullivan, the 1971 Heisman Trophy winner at Auburn who went on to coach TCU and Samford, died Sunday, Dec. 1, 2019. He was 69. (AP Photo/Butch Dill, File)Sullivan was an All-American and SEC Player of the Year his last two seasons.“He was a kind and humble gentleman, who was an Auburn legend,” Auburn athletic director Allen Greene said. “He made a lasting impact on Auburn as the school’s first Heisman Trophy winner, a coach and longtime ambassador.”Before going to Auburn, he was a three-sport star at John Carroll Catholic High School in Birmingham. Associated Presshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/associated-press/ Pop superstar Prince dies at his Minnesota home Previous articleBane stays sharp, leads men’s basketball over Illinois StateNext articleBlanket Coverage Podcast – Episode 107 (The Post-Thanksgiving/Rivalry Week Extravaganza) Associated Press RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Associated Presshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/associated-press/ Twitter ReddItlast_img read more

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Israel prevents Palestinian journalist from returning to her job in Turkey

first_img TurkeyPalestineIsraelEurope – Central AsiaMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abusesProtecting journalists ImprisonedWomenImpunity August 23, 2019 Israel prevents Palestinian journalist from returning to her job in Turkey “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says News Receive email alerts June 8, 2021 Find out more TurkeyPalestineIsraelEurope – Central AsiaMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abusesProtecting journalists ImprisonedWomenImpunity News News Hassona not only missed her 10 p.m. flight from Amman but is now trapped in the West Bank.“I arrived alone in Istanbul,” her husband, fellow Palestinian journalist Mohamad Kheiry, posted on Facebook. Kheiry, who also works for TRT in Istanbul, told RSF: “She goes to Israeli intelligence every day in an attempt to find out what is happening, and every day they tell her to come back tomorrow.”This is the first time that Hassona has been banned from travelling but she was arrested by Israeli intelligence in May 2014 and by Palestinian intelligence in December 2014.Israel is ranked 88th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2019 World Press Freedom Index while Palestine is ranked 137th. Follow the news on Europe – Central Asia June 7, 2021 Find out morecenter_img RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is shocked to learn that Israeli intelligence prevented a Palestinian journalist from returning to her job in Turkey after spending Eid with her family in the West Bank city of Nablus. In the absence of any explanation, this arbitrary ban must be lifted at once, RSF says. to go further Majdoleen Hassona, who works for the Arabic-language service of the Turkish state-owned TV broadcaster TRT in Istanbul, was prevented from leaving the West Bank in order to fly back to Istanbul from the Jordanian capital, Amman, on 18 August.Hassona told RSF that she arrived at the Allenby border crossing in Jericho – where travellers must pass successively through three controls, a Palestinian one, an Israeli one and a Jordanian one – on the afternoon of 18 August.After being held by Palestinian intelligence despite the intervention of the journalists’ union, Hassona reached the Israeli control point, where she was detained for several hours without any explanation and was finally told that she was banned from leaving the West Bank.“This travel ban is illegitimate and must be revoked at once if the Israeli authorities cannot justify it,” RSF’s Middle East desk said. “By blocking this journalist in the West Bank, they are obstructing her freedom of movement and preventing her from going back to work.” RSF_en Respect judicial independence in cases of two leading journalists in Serbia and Montenegro, RSF says Organisation News Help by sharing this information June 4, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Journalists resign en masse after Ukrainian media group’s takeover

first_imgNews September 7, 2020 Find out more Receive email alerts Ukraine escalates “information war” by banning three pro-Kremlin media UkraineEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesMedia independence Council of EuropeFreedom of expression Follow the news on Ukraine UkraineEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesMedia independence Council of EuropeFreedom of expression The editorial independence of Ukraine’s news media needs urgent protection, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) warned today, after more than 400 journalists resigned from the TV channel ZIK and its sister news agency because the opposition parliamentarian who acquired them has radically changed their editorial policies.No fewer than 90 journalists and executives abandoned ZIK TV and the ZIK news agency within days of their acquisition by “Opposition Bloc” politician Taras Kozak on 14 June. Altogether, 420 employees have said they plan to leave, in an exodus that is without precedent in the history of the Ukrainian media.They are leaving because Kozak is allied with pro-Russian oligarch Viktor Medvedchuk, because ZIK is being combined with two other TV channels, 112 and NewsOne, within a single holding company, and because the new owner has imposed new editorial policies and red lines.Programmes that often criticized Medvedchuk have been suppressed, while members or allies of Kozak’s party have become regular commentators or even programme presenters. Several sources have told Detector Media, an organization that analyses the media, that the new editor in chief has circulated a list of people banned from appearing on the channel.The editorial policies of the leading Ukrainian media tend to serve the interests of their owners, who use them to shore up their political and business influence. The Media Ownership Monitor study of the Ukrainian media – carried out jointly by RSF and the Ukrainian Institute for Mass Information (IMI) – confirmed the high degree of media ownership concentration and lack of transparency. It also revealed that most national TV channels are linked to leading political figures.“The crisis within the ZIK group is yet another example of owners meddling in the editorial policies of the Ukrainian media,” said Johann Bihr, the head of RSF’s Eastern Europe and Central Asia desk. “It is high time to stop oligarchs dominating the media outlets they own and to protect the editorial independence of their staff. We urge the new parliament to do everything possible to achieve this as soon as possible.”The new president, Volodymyr Zelensky, has convened early parliamentary elections for 21 July. Ukraine is ranked 102nd out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2019 World Press Freedom Index. to go further February 26, 2021 Find out more Crimean journalist “confesses” to spying for Ukraine on Russian TVcenter_img News News Help by sharing this information July 4, 2019 Journalists resign en masse after Ukrainian media group’s takeover Organisation RSF_en News Ukrainian media group harassed by broadcasting authority March 26, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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UAE: One year after Ahmed Mansoor’s arrest, RSF and 20 other NGOs ask for his release

first_img RSF joins Middle East and North Africa coalition to combat digital surveillance Help by sharing this information United Arab EmiratesMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abuses ImprisonedInternet capture d’écran / Film Portrait – Ahmed Mansoor – Martin Ennals Award Laureate 2015 NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say News June 8, 2021 Find out more Ahmed Mansoor, one of the few sources of freely expressed opinion in the UAE, was arrested at his Dubai home late at night a year ago and held in an undisclosed location ever since, despite condemnation from UN human rights experts and independent human rights organisations.Ahmed Mansoor , recipient of the 2015 Martin Ennals Award for Human Rights Defenders, was accused of posting “false information, rumours and lies” liable to damage the UAE’s reputation.One journalist and two citizen journalists are currentlyimprisoned in the UAE, which is ranked 119th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2017 World Press Freedom Index.Please find here the English version of the joint statement.Signed: Americans for Democracy and Human Rights in Bahrain Amnesty International Arabic Network for Human Rights Information (ANHRI) Article 19 CIVICUS Committee for the Respect of Freedoms and Human Rights in Tunisia English PEN Freedom Now, Morocco Front Line Defenders Gulf Centre for Human Rights (GCHR) Human Rights First Human Rights Watch International Commission of Jurists (ICJ) International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH), under the Observatory for the Protection of Human Rights Defenders International Service for Human Rights (ISHR) Maharat Foundation Martin Ennals Foundation Moroccan Association for Human Rights PEN International Reporters Without Borders Scholars at Risk Tunisian Association for Academic Freedoms Tunis Center for Press Freedom Tunisian Forum for Economic and Social Rights Tunisian League for Human Rights (LTDH) Tunisian Organisation against Torture Vigilance for Democracy and the Civic State World Organisation Against Torture (OMCT), under the Observatory for the Protection of Human Rights Defenders Organisation News United Arab EmiratesMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abuses ImprisonedInternet to go further Follow the news on United Arab Emirates News Related documents statement_ahmed_mansour.docxVND.OPENXMLFORMATS-OFFICEDOCUMENT.WORDPROCESSINGML.DOCUMENT – 88.1 KBahmed_mansoor_statement_-_final_arabic.docxVND.OPENXMLFORMATS-OFFICEDOCUMENT.WORDPROCESSINGML.DOCUMENT – 85.68 KB March 21, 2018 UAE: One year after Ahmed Mansoor’s arrest, RSF and 20 other NGOs ask for his release April 28, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts News RSF_en Well-known blogger and human rights defender Ahmed Mansoor has been held for a year. Reporters without borders (RSF) and 20 other NGOs ask for his immediate and unconditional release. RSF joins other NGOs in amicus brief in WhatsApp suit against NSO Group December 23, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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