Benjy’s vote is a load of bull

first_imgWhatsApp by Alan [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Benjy the bullWITH the marriage equality referendum due to take place this Friday, May 22, a Limerick animal rights group is reminding people across Ireland that gay sexual orientation is also documented in over 1500 species of different animals.According to John Carmody of Animal Rights Action Network (ARAN), Benjy the ‘gay’ bull who became an international symbol for animal and gay rights late last year, would also vote yes in the marriage equality referendum.“Benjy became an international symbol of animal and gay rights last year and made quiet a lot of country and town folk who would have never thought otherwise about animals being gay, think twice about the fact that being gay is a natural occurrence in not only humans, but bulls, bears, penguins and even gorillas,” John told the Limerick Post.“When it comes to a yes vote for Benjy, we know only too well that he would if he could,” he said. Advertisement NewsLocal NewsBenjy’s vote is a load of bullBy Alan Jacques – May 21, 2015 524 Linkedin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Twitter Email Printcenter_img Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories Previous articleCouncil to review derelict Dock Road sitesNext articleLocal businessman brings new hope to Southill Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie TAGSAnimal Rights Action Network (ARAN)Benjy the gall bullJohn Carmodylimerickmarriage equality referendum Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads last_img read more

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Antarctic Entomology

first_imgThe Antarctic region comprises the continent, the Maritime Antarctic, the sub-Antarctic islands, and the southern cold temperate islands. Continental Antarctica is devoid of insects, but elsewhere diversity varies from 2 to more than 200 species, of which flies and beetles constitute the majority. Much is known about the drivers of this diversity at local and regional scales; current climate and glacial history play important roles. Investigations of responses to low temperatures, dry conditions, and varying salinity have spanned the ecological to the genomic, revealing new insights into how insects respond to stressful conditions. Biological invasions are common across much of the region and are expected to increase as climates become warmer. The drivers of invasion are reasonably well understood, although less is known about the impacts of invasion. Antarctic entomology has advanced considerably over the past 50 years, but key areas, such as interspecific interactions, remain underexplored.last_img read more

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December 15, 2002 Letters

first_imgLetters Dignity in LawI am writing to support Tod Aronovitz and the Dignity in Law program. As a former prosecutor, public defender, judge of industrial claims, a partner with former Florida Bar President Bill Blews, and now as a tenured full professor of law, I have seen in my 30 years of being in the practice of law a lot of unwarranted attacks on a profession I still find to be noble and inspirational.I am proud to be a lawyer, and I want everybody to know the whole story about our great profession, and I want someone to respond to the unjustified attacks on our profession. Tod is doing that, but he needs our help. We lawyers need to stand together in this campaign and put aside provincial interests. It’s not about civil trial lawyers versus criminal trial lawyers and trial lawyers versus transactional lawyers. It’s about defending who and what we are. And if you are anything like me, I sometimes forget who we are and what we do. So I pull out any Bar Journal and reread the “Oath of Admission to The Florida Bar” (found this year on page 831of the Journal’s directory issue).I first “took” the “Oath” in the well of the Florida Supreme Court in the spring of 1972. It gave me goose-bumps then and it still does. I read it again before writing this letter. And when I read about “justice” and “honesty,” and “truth and honor,” “maintaining confidences,” and “preserving inviolate the secrets of my client,” and about honor and reputation, and about “never rejecting from any consideration personal to myself, the cause of the defenseless and the oppressed,” I realize why I became a lawyer and how my brothers and sisters at the Bar are “living” that “Oath.” Why shouldn’t we defend ourselves when we are attacked unjustifiably? Why shouldn’t we point out to our critics the greatness of our profession?Sure we have shortcomings, and things to do to make the justice system fairer, and we need to work harder in those areas, but what other profession polices itself as much and as openly as we do? Sure, I am ashamed of the things some of us do, but I am also extremely proud of what others do. We publish the shameful stuff and our shortcomings in our own publications.Why can’t we publish the good stuff, the rest of our story? I say, ‘Keep it up, Tod.’ I am a lawyer, and I am proud of what we do.Steve Everhart Criminal Law Section chairFoster KidsI was thrilled to read the article in the November 1 News about the Summer Fun For Kids Program in Miami, which was organized by several local lawyers to provide summer camp and other fun experiences for foster children. As a foster parent of two teenagers, and the treasurer of our local (Pinellas) foster parent association, I have seen firsthand what a huge difference such opportunities can make in the life of a foster child.In Florida, about 46,500 children are under the jurisdiction of the Department of Children and Families. Of these, almost 20,000 are in foster care. Many others live with their parents or relatives, under DCF supervision. The average length of stay in foster care is 33 months; and 18 percent of foster children have been in care for five years or longer.All of these children are at risk, and all of them have had to face very difficult circumstances in their young lives. Some have been shuffled from family to family for years. Some have suffered physical abuse, some emotional abuse, and neglect. The amazing thing is that each of these children has tremendous potential to grow and develop into a caring, productive adult. But each needs good role models to teach them how. Summer camps and other such activities, where responsible, caring adults show an interest, are a huge influence and give these kids the hope and skills they need.I would like to thank the attorneys who organized the program in Dade. Also, if any others would be interested in participating by starting start a similar program in the Pinellas County area, please contact me.Uta Grove ClearwaterLawyers and AlcoholI read with interest the November 15 full page “In Practice” article by Timothy J. Sweeney titled “A Clinical Look at the Chemically Dependant Lawyer.”Isn’t it a little inconsistent that lawyers would spend so much time and money and even have a staff attorney for and director of a “Recovering Attorneys’ Program,” when in fact we base every meeting we have on a cocktail reception? Can you think of a time when lawyers got together other than in a courtroom or at a closing without prefacing or completing their meeting with alcohol? Just scan the agenda for the Midyear Meeting.Maybe we should re-examine how we do things and then we can spend a little less time and money on recovery.William C. Davell Ft. Lauderdale December 15, 2002 Letters December 15, 2002 Letterslast_img read more

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Boxer to fight for a cause

first_imgELLSWORTH — Chris Sarro will be fighting for a cause on May 13 in Manhattan.The Ellsworth boxer will compete in an event called the May Melee, which will exclusively benefit the Give a Kid a Dream program. Sarro is training and raising money for the foundation.“It’s for an extremely good cause,” Sarro said. “It’s helping kids find a path in life through boxing.”Since 1991, Give a Kid a Dream has provided children from disadvantaged backgrounds both mentorship and a place to develop themselves both physically and mentally through the sport of boxing.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textTo donate to Sarro’s fundraiser, visit crowdrise.com/chrissarro. To learn more about the event, visit mayatbbkings.com.last_img read more

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Boeheim, Beilein rekindle CNY history in Final Four

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Related Stories Michigan coach Beilein searches for 1st-career win against Syracuse, Boeheim’s complex zone Back in the 1980s, when Jim Boeheim’s glasses were a bit bigger and his sport coats a bit more plaid, John Beilein would look up into the stands and see his crosstown colleague there in support.Beilein, the head coach at Le Moyne from 1983-1992, never received a phone call from Boeheim asking for tickets to any of the Dolphins’ rivalry games against schools like Gannon or Philadelphia Textile, but he would spot him in the bleachers every now and then.“I think this happened more than just a few times, maybe every other season,” Beilein, now the head coach at Michigan, said in a teleconference Monday. “ … Jim would be in the stands watching a game on occasion.”From their days as college coaches in the same city, Beilein and Boeheim became well acquainted — the former working his way up the coaching ladder through Central New York, and the latter helping out along the way with a timely phone call or show of support.On Saturday, those coaches will meet again, this time on the largest stage yet: the Final Four. Beilein arrives in Atlanta following stops at Canisius, Richmond and West Virginia, among others, while Boeheim remains entrenched at the university he has come to define. And when Beilein’s Wolverines meet Boeheim’s Syracuse squad, a Salt City showdown will ensue.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“We’d be up playing St. Lawrence or Potsdam or something, playing St. Rose or St. Michael’s, and it would be a whiteout or a snowstorm,” Beilein said with a chuckle. “Listening to the Syracuse-Georgetown game (on the radio) with 30,000 people while we’re just trying to make it home alive.”Beilein, who is making his first appearance in the Final Four, described his coaching career as “nomadic.” He worked his way from Newfane (N.Y.) High School to Erie Community College to Nazareth, made stops at Le Moyne, Canisius and Richmond, then broke onto the national scene at West Virginia before finally arriving in Ann Arbor, Mich.He’s amassed 672 total wins along the way, including a National Invitation Tournament championship in 2007. But this season, with point guard Trey Burke leading the way, Beilein guided Michigan to the Final Four.“I’m not sure he’s had any adversity,” Boeheim said in the teleconference. “He’s been successful wherever he’s been. I remember him at Erie, Le Moyne, Canisius, Richmond, you name it. West Virginia. He’s won every place he’s been. That’s difficult to do, to be able to go to five or six different places and win.”But their relationship began when Beilein was at Le Moyne. He said Boeheim used to bring his Syracuse players to some of the clinics Le Moyne was hosting, which helped the Dolphins’ budget and generated more interest. And Beilein always admired the friendliness Boeheim displayed toward his wife and kids.Boeheim’s respect for Beilein manifested itself in the form of reference phone calls. Beilein credited Boeheim for helping him land the head coaching job at Canisius, which he took after a decade at Le Moyne. Then, Boeheim picked up the phone again in 2002 to recommend him to West Virginia.“Both jobs I recommended him highly because I thought he was a great coach and would do a great job at both places,” Boeheim said. “Especially when the West Virginia athletic director called me, I told him to hang up the phone and call John Beilein back and hire him without waiting another minute because he’s a great coach and he’s won every place he’s been. He’s just a tremendous guy and a great basketball coach.”Beilein chuckled as he thought back to those days of piling his Le Moyne team into two vans — not buses — and trekking around the region through snow and sleet. Imagining himself at the Final Four, albeit two decades later, seemed farfetched.But Saturday, it all becomes real, and Beilein will share the same stage as his figurative big brother from the late 1980s and early 90s.From mini vans in Syracuse to chartered planes in Michigan, and now the Final Four in Atlanta.“I wouldn’t suggest this route I took to anyone,” Beilein said. “I think you’ve got to be very lucky to get to this point.” Commentscenter_img Published on April 2, 2013 at 12:51 am Contact Michael: [email protected] | @Michael_Cohen13last_img read more

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