Scholarships

first_imgBy Stephanie SchupskaUniversity of GeorgiaWhen Ron Walcott talked to high school students at a recent Georgia Daze breakfast, he had five new ways to entice them to come to the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences – five, full-ride scholarships for minority students.The scholarships, funded by a U.S. Department of Agriculture multicultural scholars grant, are welcome news as the college and the agricultural industries they support work to recruit more minorities into agriculture-related careers.“There are all these jobs over here through our college, and all these people who need jobs who are not in our college. There’s a big disconnect,” said Walcott, who is the CAES assistant dean for diversity and multiculturalism and an associate professor of plant pathology. “The jobs that are here are very fruitful and rewarding.”CAES graduates are in jobs from Chick-fil-A corporate offices to Capitol Hill. They’ve gone on to work at top-level jobs in horticulture, poultry science, food science and engineering. They now work for various government agencies, in forensic pathology and as environmental advocates.When Walcott is talking to highly qualified minority students through various CAES programs like the Georgia Daze breakfast and the Young Scholars Program, a full ride from other universities is often what pulls them away from UGA. The summer-long Young Scholars Program allows high school students who show a high aptitude in math and science to intern in CAES labs. “We have to have something to offer them,” said Jean Bertrand, CAES assistant dean of academic affairs. “They’re going because of such good scholarships. Receiving these scholarships is the only way we could compete.”CAES has slightly higher minority numbers than other UGA colleges.“CAES is fortunate to have many talented faculty dedicated to diversity,” said Louise Wicker, a CAES professor of food science and technology. In the past year, CAES received two USDA grants – the $150,000 multicultural scholars grant and a $142,000 higher education challenge grant. The HEC grant, directed by Wicker, helps undergraduate minority students gain research and job experience in UGA labs at the Athens, Tifton and Griffin campuses. It also provides funds for faculty, staff and students to improve their mentorship skills in science, technology, engineering and math.Walcott is developing a network of high school teachers who serve underrepresented populations in Georgia’s metro areas. He wants to show them what agricultural careers really entail so they will send students his direction.In the past few years, CAES has seen a slight increase in minority populations. In 2007, CAES had 55 Asian students, or 3.9 percent of the population, up from 33 students in 2003. In 2007, the college had 62 African-American students, or 4.3 percent of the population, up from 35 students in 2003.In fall 2008, CAES had 1,588 undergraduate and 414 graduate students, a record enrollment. “We need a more diverse pool of students to serve the more diverse industry,” Bertrand said. “And we need our industry to become more diverse to serve our even more diverse society.”Walcott said one way to entice students into ag-related majors is to get agriculture on their radars. Most don’t know about agriculture or what they know is wrong. Whether they make it a career or are simply advocate for agriculture, he wants them to think, “Oh, ag. Oh, that’s so cool.”He sees education as the “only real way you can change your class, your chance to earn money and your outlook on life in your lifetime,” he said.Walcott grew up in Barbados. Instead of making basketball a career or becoming a medical doctor, he moved to Iowa State University and went into plant pathology.(Stephanie Schupska is a news editor for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

Continue reading

David Clifton – Licensing expert: Could affordability checks follow age & identity verification changes?

first_imgShare UKGC hails ‘delivered efficiencies’ of its revamped licence maintenance service  August 20, 2020 StumbleUpon UKGC launches fourth National Lottery licence competition August 28, 2020 Related Articles Winning Post: Swedish regulator pushes back on ‘Storebror’ approach to deposit limits August 24, 2020 Share Submit David CliftonSBC News has already reported on last week’s Gambling Commission “consultation response” confirming the forthcoming LCCP changes on age and identity verification for remote gambling.In adding my own take on those changes, I also include a comment below on another highly relevant matter flowing from this latest emanation from the UK’s gambling regulator, namely its encouragement to remote gambling operators to collaborate on the issue of customer affordability.1  Age and identity verificationFor good reason, the prime focus within the industry media over the last few days has been on what needs to be done by remote betting and gaming operators licensed by the Gambling Commission to ensure compliance by the time that the new LCCP age and identity verification requirements come into effect on 7 May.From that date, the existing LCCP provision that remote licence-holders require customers to “affirm they are of legal age” will be removed (although the Commission does say that such a provision can be retained if a licence holder thinks that doing so will supplement its overall approach to preventing underage gambling).Regardless of whether that provision is retained, all affected remote licence-holders (including lottery operators other than those offering merely subscription or low-frequency lotteries) will be required to verify the age of any customer before the customer can:deposit funds into an account,access any free-to-play games the licensee may make available, orgamble with the licence-holder with either their own money or a free bet or bonus.A new licence condition will also require all such affected remote licence holders to:verify, as a minimum, the name, address and date of birth of a customer before allowing them to gamble,ask for any additional verification information promptly,inform customers, before they can deposit funds, of the types of identity documents or other information that might be required, the circumstances in which the information might be required, and how it should be supplied to the licensee andin what amounts to a requirement to maintain a greater degree of customer monitoring than is required currently, take reasonable steps to ensure that information on their customers’ identities remains accurate.The Commission has published a summary of the forthcoming key LCCP changes that you will find here.To ensure compliance by the appointed date, it is important that operators start planning now for implementation of all required technological changes, development of new systems for manually verifying those customers not automatically verified at the first attempt and all associated staff training. In so doing, it will be important to remember that it is verification before deposit or gambling, rather than verification at the point of registration (as some respondents to the consultation mistakenly thought) that will trigger the need to make changes to their existing systems.Affected operators should bear in mind that the Commission (a) acknowledges that it would be disproportionate to require licence-holders to have verified all their active customers in advance of the changes to LCCP taking effect and (b) is not expecting operators to verify inactive customers who may not conduct any further gambling activity with them. However, with effect from 7 May, where a licence-holder has not yet verified the name, address or date of birth of any existing customer, the Commission will expect it to do so before that customer next gambles with it.They should also bear in mind that the Commission is not intending to prescribe a uniform methodology for verification, instead focusing on the desired outcome of the verification process, namely that the licence-holder is satisfied that it has, as robustly as possible, established the identity of the customer and that it can demonstrate to the Commission what it has done to satisfy itself as to the verification of that person’s identity.Even though respondents to the consultation gave time estimates of between three and twelve months to implement the required changes to systems and procedures, the Commission has made it clear that it will have little sympathy for any operator that fails to ensure compliance with the new LCCP requirements by 7 May (i.e. within just three months from the date of the consultation response), saying that, amongst other things, it is “mindful that licensees have been aware of [its] direction of travel on verification since [its] proposals were first outlined in [its] Online Review in March 2018”.The Commission has decided against proceeding with what had been a proposal to reduce the risk of fraudulent card use by requiring licence-holders to verify that an account holder’s identity matches up with the name linked to the payment method they use (for example, that the name associated with a debit card matches the verified name of the gambling account holder). The reason is that such a proposal is not currently viable because the payer’s name is not verified during the payment authorisation process, with the consequence that no online retailer or merchant can access any verified cardholder name details from a payment transaction.The Commission accordingly acknowledges that, as matters stand, “remote gambling licensees therefore cannot verify that the payer is the same person as the gambling account holder” but states that licence-holders “should still consider how they can use the information available to them to mitigate risks as part of their fraud prevention processes as online merchants”. It provides the following example: “if a licensee requires its customers to input ‘cardholder name’ details as part of the payment journey then it could conduct basic in-house checks to query any circumstance where the cardholder name keyed in clearly does not match the name of the verified gambling account holder”, adding that “this could help to flag the need for further checks on certain customers when they add additional payment cards”.2  Free-to-play gamesIn light of questions posed to me last week, it is worth confirming that the new age verification requirement will apply to free-to-play games on websites of those who hold operating licences granted by the Gambling Commission. It will not apply to non-licence holders over whom the Commission has no regulatory powers, including those who supply solely social games or social casino games.However, the Commission does sound a note of warning in its consultation response that whether or not it advises the UK Government of the need for additional regulation for the social casino sector will depend on operators within that sector “pursuing a proactive and credible approach to social responsibility and an awareness of potential harm, which must continue to encompass best practice consumer measures”.You can read more about the Commission’s view on free-to-play games here.3  AffordabilityThe Gambling Commission’s consultation response has gone further than merely the issue of age and identity verification. It also contains the Commission’s reaction to the information provided by respondents in relation to its plan, originally identified within its Online Gambling Review, to:ensure that operators set limits on consumers’ spending until affordability checks have been conducted andconsult on requirements for licensees to set limits on customers’ gambling activity that could only be changed once the licensee had further verified information about the customer.In the above respects, in last September’s consultation on age and identity verification, the Commission requested information or evidence of good practice (both in terms of existing practice and what is possible) that helps licence-holders and customers to ensure that gambling remains fair and safe.In what will come as a welcome relief to many operators, the Commission has confirmed in its consultation response that it is “not proposing at this stage to introduce a specific licence condition or code to require mandatory account limits”, but it is nevertheless encouraging remote gambling operators “to collaborate in developing approaches to assess the levels of gambling that a customer might be able to afford”.Some of the questions it posed in last September’s consultation were expressly directed at the issue of affordability. In an indication of what might yet be coming, the Commission asked:What types of information are you able to access that could help inform you as to how much a new customer might be able to afford to gamble?Do you consider socio-demographic or economic data, that is not specific to the customer’s identity, but which could help to inform an assessment of what they might be able to afford to gamble (e.g. postcode deprivation indices) and could these be used to inform limit setting?What information have you already acquired from the application of any limits on your customers’ accounts?What information have you gathered from your enforcement of these limits as part of your customer interaction processes?Do you verify any economic information specific to the customer (e.g. credit scoring data, employment history or indicators of income and expenditure) as part of your risk’s assessment?What do you think of the idea of gambling businesses setting limits on a customer’s gambling until they know more about them?What information should a gambling business use to decide whether to change or remove a limit?In its consultation response, having considered (and commented on) the answers received to the each of the above (and other) questions, the Commission has summarised its current position as follows:“We welcome the responses to these questions from licensees, consumers and third parties, and we will use the feedback to continue to develop our work in this area.We will continue to engage with remote gambling licensees and encourage them to collaborate in developing approaches to assess the levels of gambling that a customer might be able to afford. This will form part of our broader work with licensees and financial institutions to better understand the range of accessible data and how it could inform mandatory limit setting, before we consider consulting on options at a later date”.“We note the concerns raised by consumers regarding the purpose of any such checks, and the related issues of data security and privacy. In progressing our work in this area, we will consider the balance that may be needed between allaying these concerns and the opportunities for stronger consumer protections that could be delivered”.“We will consider the responses submitted as part of this call for information when reviewing and updating our customer interaction guidance, and we will publish a consultation on the customer interaction elements of LCCP in February. Licensees should take account of the details submitted as part of this call for information, as outlined in this section, when reviewing their own approaches to harm prevention”.It seems we can expect to learn more about this ‘affordability’ issue once the Commission’s consultation on the customer interaction elements of the LCCP has been published later this month._____________________Article by David Clifton – Director of Clifton Davies Consultancylast_img read more

Continue reading

Gautrain rolling along smoothly

first_imgThe Gautrain arrives in South Africa. Aunit is offloaded at Durban harbour. Construction work under way atSandton station. A completed unit takes to the tracks at themanufacturing facility in Derby, UK.(All images: Gautrain)Janine ErasmusThe Gautrain’s airport link is on track for completion by the end of 2009, according to a statement released by Gautrain. This will signal the end of the first phase of the controversial multi-billion-rand rapid transport system.With the 2010 Fifa World Cup kickoff just 504 days away, the vital stretch of track between OR Tambo International and Sandton Station will transport an expected 500 000 Fifa World Cup visitors between 11 June and 11 July – not to mention 19 000 members of the international press.Gauteng province and its capital city Johannesburg will form the hub of the Fifa World Cup and because of this, the route from OR Tambo International airport into the city was a key factor for Fifa officials during their consideration of proposals from prospective host countries. The opening ceremony as well as the first game and final will be held in Johannesburg, which will also be the seat of the broadcast centre and Fifa’s local offices.Gautrain CEO Jack van der Merwe said that the airport link will be similar to that offered by other major international airports such as Heathrow. The price of a trip is currently estimated at around R80.Van der Merwe said that construction work and laying of track along the route will be complete by December 2009, after which the train will be put through its paces in a series of tests. According to Van der Merwe tests began in Derby, UK, in mid-2008 during construction of the first set of coaches. He added that the Gautrain would undergo some 7 000km worth of testing before being given the all clear to carry passengers.Gautrain units are currently tested at a facility in Midrand where communications and signalling systems have been set up. Because the train is controlled by a complicated electronic system, it must be thoroughly tested and certified before a single passenger can set foot on board.Despite the fact that the Gautrain was not originally meant to be complete by 2010 and there is the possibility of running into a few hiccups, said Brian Bruce of construction company Murray and Roberts, all projects are going well.Goodbye to ImbokodoHaving done its job of digging out a 3km underground section between Marlboro and Johannesburg, the state of the art tunnel-boring machine will be dismantled before the middle of 2009. The machine, which was custom built in Germany at a cost of R300-million (US$30-million), goes by the nickname of Imbokodo (isiZulu, meaning rock), weighs 325 tons, and requires an additional 560 tons of backup equipment.Gautrain will travel for most of its route on the ground or across massive viaducts, but will descend underground for a 15km stretch. Of this, Imbokodo was needed to excavate the 3km of soft or waterlogged rock that could not be dug out by the traditional means of drilling and blasting.According to Gautrain management, the front end of the machine will be buried underground in the business suburb of Rosebank. The backup equipment, said Van der Merwe, will be recycled for use in other digging projects but the front end was built specifically for Gautrain and cannot be re-used.Other Gautrain highlightsNumerous parts of the Gautrain project are scheduled for completion during 2009. A section of the route in the Marlboro area, where the two sets of track cross under the N3 highway, will be finished in July. Work on bridges on the Marlboro-OR Tambo line is nearing completion and is expected to be complete in August.The tunnel access point at Mushroom Farm Park in Sandton will be complete around the middle of the year. The park has been closed to the public for the duration of construction but will be rehabilitated and reopened a few months later.Gautrain management is expecting a new consignment of 15 cars from Derby. Construction of passenger units has already begun at the local Gautrain facility in Nigel, east of Johannesburg, and the first finished units will roll out in June. All cars will then be taken to the test track in Midrand for months of extensive testing.The process of recruiting staff to test drive the train is also scheduled for the first half of 2009. Full-time drivers will be appointed as the year progresses. Van der Merwe says that Gautrain will create at least 300 000 jobs, both directly and in related services.Award-winning conceptGautrain won an international award in May 2008 at the annual Public Private Finance Awards ceremony held in London. Described as the biggest in the Private Public Partnership (PPP) sector, the awards are held by the UK-based Public Private Finance magazine. The publication is the industry’s most respected source of information regarding PPP projects in the United Kingdom and Europe.Winners are selected by a panel of experts, and represent the best of the current market. Gautrain scooped the award for Best Global Deal to Sign. “Judges recognised the Gautrain’s expertise to overcome the unique engineering and socio-economic developmental requirements of this PPP project,” said Jack van der Merwe.Gautrain was up against other international projects such as the Britannia Mine Water Treatment Plant and The Conference Centre Dublin.Do you have qyeries or comments about this article? Email Janine Erasmus on [email protected] linksGautrainDepartment of TranaportPrivate Public Finance magazinelast_img read more

Continue reading

“Steinmaennchen 3” GC1BZ5M GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – August 9th, 2010

first_imgMotoleni says, “Bei meinen Motorradtouren im Gebirge habe ich immer wieder alte Wegmarkierungen in Form von Steinmännchen gesehen.So kam der Gedankediese Idee auch fürs Geocaching zu verwenden. Das erste Steinmännchen steht bei mir Garten und die Resonanz der Geocacher ist überwältigend. Jede Menge toll bemalter Steine und nicht weniger tolle Logeinträge. Inzwischen ist die Zahl der Steinmännchen auf 9 angewachsen. Verschiedene Owner haben mich angemailt, und gefragt, ob sie diese Idee aufgreifen können.”The difficulty 1, terrain 3.5 cache was placed in April of 2008.  It’s been found nearly 40 times since. Geocachers who have logged the find write, “The way to this cache is quite challenging, but worth doing. We wouldn’t have done it if not for the cache. The view from the top is really marvelous! Good shoes are recommended for the walk.”You can explore all the world of geocaching by checking out all Geocaches of the Week.Share with your Friends:More A cairn at the site of “Steinmaenncher 3” SharePrint Related”Swan Valley Safe” GC2MRF0 GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – February 21, 2011February 22, 2011In “Community”Aloha from Hawaii! — Honu Beach Cache (GC102CV) — Geocache of the WeekJanuary 20, 2016In “Community””DSOM – Minero las piedras” GC273NE GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – November 21, 2011November 21, 2011In “Community”center_img View from “Steinmaenncher 3″“Steinmaenncher” translates to English as “Stone Man.”  Steinmaennchen 3(GC1BZ5M) is one of nearly two dozen geocaches throughout the island nation of Seychelles.  The traditional cache takes geocachers up a steep slope and through a dense jungle on the main island, just outside the capitol city of Victoria.The key piece of advice from the cache owner, Motoleni,  is to bring adequate water for the 1.5 km hike.We asked Motoleni why he named the geocache “Steinmaenncher.”  His answer, in his native German, below, describes seeing the “Stone Men,” or cairns, as he drove his motorcycle through the mountains. The piles of rocks were used to hold sign posts.  He asks geocachers to create a cairn at the site of the geocache.  So far, there are nine cairns at the site – some even have painted rocks.last_img read more

Continue reading

How Your Term Sheet Affects Your Reputation

first_imgIn many cases it’s worse to have your investor back out on a term sheet then it is to never be offered one. Before popping the champagne bottles and celebrating what looks like an offer, it’s best to remember that VC term sheets are not legally binding. While it’s certainly a feat to be offered one, angel investor and Hunch cofounder Chris Dixon wrote a great piece reminding startup entrepreneurs what can happen if your potential investor changes his or her mind. In a recent blog post Dixon explains the unfortunate circumstance of one of his portfolio companies. Says Dixon, “Yesterday, one of the 40 or so startups I’ve invested in (either personally or through Founder Collective had a well-known VC back out of a term sheet for no particular reason besides that they decided they no longer liked the business concept. It’s the first time I’ve seen this happen in my career.”Dixon explains that generally VCs only do this in extreme cases of fraud or upon finding that founders have criminal backgrounds. Because of this, any rescinded term sheet can be devastating for startup companies. As is the case with startup CEOs, word travels fast on Sand Hill Road. In a recent presentation I watched as one founder revealed his funding from several well-established angel investors. Those in the room perked up as soon as they realized that major players were already involved in the company. The same logic can be attributed to the loss of a term sheet. When one firm backs out of an offer, others who may have been interested will look at you under extreme scrutiny. Although Dixon’s case appears to be an anomaly, it’s important to remember that as an entrepreneur you should remain ever-diligent and avoid over-promising returns and results. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… dana oshirocenter_img Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#start#StartUp 101#startups 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Continue reading

Talking to Military Kids About Money

first_imgThe Personal Finance concentration group of the Military Families Learning Network will present a web conference for personal financial management professionals, as well as other professionals, working with military families on Thursday, Feb. 23 at 2:30 p.m. AFC and CHC-credentialed financial professionals are eligible to receive 1.5 AFCPE CEUs from this 90-minute presentation.Anita McKinney and Dr. Kate Fogarty will present this session on teaching children financial skills.McKinney is a faculty member with the University of Florida IFAS. She teaches basic financial literacy topics for clients of social service agencies, conducts worksite educational programs, trains social service employees to work with clients on money issues and organizes mentors and volunteers for a Master Money Mentors program.Dr. Kate Fogarty works with Florida Extension / 4-H and has a teaching appointment at the University of Florida’s Department of Family, Youth, and Community Sciences. Her experience includes program implementation and evaluation of youth leadership and character education programs.This presentation will help PFMs working with military parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles understand developmentally appropriate ways to create daily conversations about money with their child by:• Modeling good financial habits and attitudes.• Providing opportunities to help children practice financial skills.Selected research articles and online resources have been identified to enhance this web conference for participants. These readings can be found here.Instructions on how to get the credits will be given at the end of the web presentation.Please join the session by clicking here a few minutes before 2:30 p.m. on the 23rd.Author: Molly C. Herndon (+Molly Herndon)last_img read more

Continue reading

The 6 Best Cases To Protect Your Video Gear

first_imgDo you have other tips for protecting gear? Let us know in the comments. Protect your video gear with this round-up of the six best cases on the market.Top image via Shutterstock.Filmmaking equipment is expensive. Choosing the right gear for your shoot requires careful consideration. After all, the right gear can make or break a shoot.However, you can quickly render your gear useless if you don’t also take measures to protect it. Cases and bags to transport equipment are just as critical as the equipment itself. Because there are so many variations and different types of protective gear, deciding which pieces are right for you can get confusing quickly. Below are a variety of protective bags and cases that you can buy on the market at a relatively good price. Remember: protection is more important than style.Lowepro Pro Roller X300 AW This bag is a stellar all-in-one choice for a one-man crew. It can accommodate two DSLRs with battery grips, or a single professional video camera. With a DSLR set up, it can house 8-10 lenses and a host of accessories. The best selling point for this case is that you can change it from a hard-shell roller into a compact backpack.In roller mode, it can also accommodate a lightweight tripod or monopod.Vanguard Supreme 53F Hard CaseWhile the Pro Roller offers robust protection for your equipment, it is not as durable as a solid hard case. The Vanguard Supreme 53F is compact and light enough for a lone wolf, but it also offers sufficient space for a standard gear set up. In the words of the brand itself, this case is “virtually indestructible.”The roller comes with customizable foam, or you can buy a divider bag. If you need a case for a variety of different jobs and will likely be swapping out your gear for each one, I would recommend buying the divider bag. I have a Pelican Case 1550 that was cut specifically to house a RED ONE. I now use a different camera, and my protective case doesn’t house it very well.This case is built to withstand extreme conditions. Waterproof up to five meters, it can withstand temperatures from 40°F/-40°C to 203°F/95°C. Pelican Case 1550Perhaps you want a dedicated case just for your camera or another piece of isolated equipment — for security or insurance purposes, for example. I mentioned that I used the Pelican 1550 to carry a RED ONE, and I kept it after parting with the camera. The reason is that it’s a solid case — one of the best, in fact. It’s waterproof, crushproof, dustproof, and corrosion-proof. I felt at ease carrying an expensive camera in this case. For extra security, it also offers two areas you can padlock. As one Amazon reviewer put it, “Pelican Cases are like portable bank vaults.”My 1550 is large enough to store a RED ONE, a 5.6-inch RED monitor, a battery, a battery plate, and wires for those accessories. It’s not large enough for a full cinema camera kit, but it offers enough space to keep the core equipment safe.Pelican Protector 1300The Pelican Protector 1300 is, essentially, a mini 1550 — perfect for gear you want to protect individually. This case is 9.87″ x 7″ x 6.12,” so it’s a lot smaller. In fact, it’s one of the smallest cases that can house a DSLR and still offer the same durability as a larger case. I use one of these to store my audio recorder and pre-amp.ARRI 571197 Heavy-Duty CaseStoring lights can be a pain if you don’t have sufficient storage facilities at home. I purchased the ARRI 571197 primarily so I could store my Fresnel kit in a secure location. It has a hard plastic shell and weighs thirty pounds by itself. It is a robust case, but it’s heavy. It does, however, have built-in wheels, which makes moving the lights a much easier experience.Unfortunately, it’s not large enough for any lights bigger than a 1k. I use it to transport two 650w, one 300w, and one 150w. There’s even enough room for a few rolled up gels and gobos.Pelican Case 0350I use the 0350 to store my LED lights and everything else. It’s waterproof, dustproof, crushproof, chemical resistant, and unbreakable. It’s also stackable with other cube cases, which makes it perfect for storage at home or in a vehicle. (You’ll find images of the military using this case because it’s so large and robust.) The case itself is quite wide and will often require two people to carry it. As such, there are two handles on either side. Or you can purchase wheels separately and install them yourself.This case offers four steel-reinforced padlock compartments. Like all pelican products, there are a variety of foam options available, but since this case is so large, you can also buy layer dividers to maximize its space. You could essentially have four layers of lenses.The only con for this case is that you need to replace the wheels every so often. The standard wheels you can purchase aren’t the best quality; I would recommend third-party rubber wheels.Here’s a bonus shout-out for the 0945 Memory Card Case. If you’re going to protect your equipment, why not go the extra mile and keep your media safe too? You can find options for compact flash and SD cards.last_img read more

Continue reading

Azhar Mahmood picks up five-for and scores 31-ball 55, puts Auckland Aces in main draw of CLT20

first_imgVeteran all-rounder Azhar Mahmood grabbed five wickets and struck a blistering half-century as Auckland Aces thrashed Hampshire by 8 wickets to qualify for the main draw of the Champions League Twenty20 tournament here today.Mahmood made inroads into the Hampshire top-order as Auckland bundled out the English county team for a modest 121 in the stipulated 20 overs.Mahmood then smashed an unbeaten 31-ball-55 to steer his side to a comfortable win with 33 balls to spare. The Pakistan discard hit five sixes and four boundaries during his innings.Mahmood, who is now a British passport holder, ripped apart the Hampshire top-order when he removed James Vince (11) and Jimmy Adams (0) in a space of four balls.Auckland thus became the first team to qualify for the main draw of the tournament that starts Saturday. The New Zealand T20 champions have won both their qualifying matches, having beaten Sialkot Stallions in the first game on Tuesday.Two teams — one each from Pool 1 and 2 of the qualifying rounds — will join the other eight teams in the main competition.The result of today’s match means the final game of Pool 1 between Sialkot Stallions and Hampshire has been reduced to a dead rubber, with both teams already out contention.last_img read more

Continue reading

Openers drive Sri Lanka to 93-0 at lunch in 2nd Test

first_img\R Colombo, Jul 20 (AFP) Openers Danushka Gunathilaka and Dimuth Karunaratne helped Sri Lanka reach 93 for no loss at lunch on day one of the second Test against South Africa in Colombo on Friday.Gunathilaka, on 44, and Karunaratne, on 42, were at the crease after the hosts elected to bat first in their bid to clinch the two-match series.Sri Lanka, who won the opening game in Galle last week, are eyeing their first series win against the number-two ranked Proteas since 2006.Gunathilaka and Karunaratne mixed the right dose of caution and aggression to keep the South African bowling attack at sea on a pitch that promises to offer considerable turn as the match progresses.Paceman Dale Steyn will probably have to wait for another session to get past former teammate Shaun Pollock to become the country’s leading wicket taker in Tests. He is tied with Pollock’s 421 wickets.South Africa’s only regular spinner in the XI, Keshav Maharaj also failed to break through the denfences of the two left-handed openers at the Sinhalese Sports Club ground.South Africa are without a second specialist spinner for this match, choosing to bolster their batting by bringing in 25-year-old Theunis de Bruyn, in place of left-arm wrist spinner Tabraiz Shamsi, who had played in Galle.Sri Lanka decided to go with three frontline spinners in their XI, though they did exchange the left-arm wrist spin of Lakshan Sandakan for the offspin of Akila Dananjaya.The hosts are without regular captain Dinesh Chandimal, who is suspended for the series due to a breach of the spirit of cricket. (AFP) APAAPAadvertisementlast_img read more

Continue reading