Councillors in for €8000 pay rise

first_imgNewsPoliticsCouncillors in for €8000 pay riseBy Bernie English – December 8, 2019 618 Twitter Advertisement Linkedin Previous articleArias and Advent with Irish Chamber OrchestraNext articleCall for ban on use of helium balloons in Limerick Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. Cllr Michael Sheahan, Fine Gael. Photo: Cian ReinhardtLIMERICK’S Mayor has given the thumbs up to a proposed €8,000 pay rise for local councillors.Mayor Michael Sheahan (FG) a veteran of local politics, told the Limerick Post he hopes that if the proposal is passed it will encourage more young people and more women to take the political road.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “If there was some sort of attractive remuneration, it might encourage more people to become involved in politics,” he explained.“It might encourage young people and particularly women, who may be put off by the financial implications of taking time out of work at a time in their careers when finances can be tough, to get involved.”The government is shortly to get an independent review of the remuneration offered to local representatives.Currently, councillors are paid a basic salary of around €17,000, with unvouched expenses up to €2,667 and vouched expenses of €5,000.Mayor Sheahan said that while people elected to the council don’t do the job for the money “it would be good if there was a better financial incentive to get a wider representation.“This is a fair proposal and it has been carefully and fully researched by someone with no political axe to grind.“We were lucky to get a good influx of new young councillors but the questions is, will they stay? They bring a fantastic new perspective to the work we do and councillors do work long hard hours.”Councillors who  work in the public service are given paid time off to attend monthly meetings but those working in the private sector have to do so mostly on their own time.center_img Email Facebook Print WhatsApplast_img read more

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Notre Dame welcomes new rectors to campus

first_imgIn some campus residence halls, freshmen and transfer students won’t be the only new residents this week. New rectors will welcome students in Breen-Phillips Hall, Farley Hall, Keenan Hall, Stanford Hall and Zahm House as they transition into their jobs as dorm leaders. Associate Vice President for Residential Life Heather Rakoczy Russell said rectors have four important roles within their dorms: pastoral leader, chief administrator, community builder and university resource. Backgrounds in each of these areas are the criteria the University uses to hire new rectors, she said. “We’re looking for people who are trained in theology, ministry, education – specifically higher education – and that they have a sense of themselves and their work and mission in ministry, education, student development and formation of the whole person,” Russell said. Scott Opperman, rector of Zahm House and a former Notre Dame graduate student, said the intersection of all these areas influenced his decision to apply to be a rector at the University. “I will try to integrate academics and spirituality into residence life, and Notre Dame does that very well already,” Opperman said. “I believe in the Holy Cross charism and mission that the University of Notre Dame has … I love Notre Dame so much so it’s just a perfect fit for me.” Stephan Johnson, rector of Stanford Hall, said working with young people is one of the best parts of his job. “I feel really fortunate to be here, and I think it’s a tremendous calling to have an opportunity to affect so many of God’s great children,” Johnson said. “Every time I see them, they inspire me, and they give me personally a sense of hope about the world.” Sr. Mary Catherine McNamara, rector of Breen-Phillips Hall, is a Sister of the Incarnate Word and Blessed Sacrament, and she said in a statement that being a rector has great religious significance for her. “Simply put, it is a ‘God-thing,’” she said. “I believe God is inviting me to accept the challenge and embrace the opportunity to carry on the rich tradition of serving as Rector of Breen-Phillips Hall. It seems to be a natural next step on my journey of ministry.” Although previous ties to Notre Dame are not required, some rectors have a long history with the University. Elizabeth Moriarty, rector of Farley Hall, lived in Farley as an undergraduate and also received a master’s degree in divinity from the University. “I am humbled to be returning to Notre Dame, yet again, to be the next rector of Farley Hall, which I believe is the result of the divine intervention of my dear friend and confirmation sponsor, Sr. Jean Lenz,” she said in a statement. Lenz passed away in January. Noel Terranova, rector of Keenan Hall, is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in theology at Notre Dame. He said in a statement he hopes his faith will guide him to be a good leader in his dorm. “I feel it is a noble calling to guide young people through a transitional period in their adult development that will have a deep and formative impact on how they live the rest of their lives,” Terranova said. “I pray that Spirit will guide me so that the men of Keenan will know me as a strong leader, with firm convictions and a gentle heart.” Opperman said he looks forward to promoting a welcoming culture in Zahm House and celebrating the dorm’s 75th anniversary this year. “We’re going to strive to be the most inclusive and welcoming Notre Dame residential community,” Opperman said. “Another fundamental thing is we have to respect, care for and love ourselves and others, and we’re going to do that in an exceptional way.” Johnson said building community is also important for him in Stanford Hall, and he is working to institute a big brother program within the dorm. But his first goal is to emphasize service, he said. “My primary goal is that we become known all over campus as the hall that dedicates itself to serving others,” Johnson said. “One of the themes of our year is ‘Fend for Others.’ We’re going to get the guys out of the dorm and into some of the impoverished areas in our community and even challenge them to go beyond that.” Russell said she is impressed with this year’s group of new rectors, and she is excited to see what they will accomplish. “I am delighted,” she said. “What all of these rectors share in common is a deep connection to Notre Dame.”last_img read more

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‘I saw Dudus kill 4’ – Witness tells of murder, guns and drugs

first_img 13 Views   no discussions NewsRegional ‘I saw Dudus kill 4’ – Witness tells of murder, guns and drugs by: – May 23, 2012 Share Sharing is caring! COKE… pleaded guilty to racketeering and conspiracy charges in 2011NEW YORK, USA — A prosecution witness in the case against former Tivoli Gardens strongman Christopher ‘Dudus’ Coke yesterday gave details and damaging evidence of murder, gunrunning and drug-trafficking allegedly carried out at the direction of and by Coke himself.The witness, who is a former resident of Denham Town and Tivoli Gardens, told an evidentiary hearing here that he was part of Coke’s inner circle which operated a criminal system from Tivoli.He told the court that the system extended to the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom and involved the importation of drugs and guns into Jamaica.The witness also related in detail the murders of a least four persons he claimed he witnessed Coke carry out at a ‘jail’ in Tivoli.However, under blistering cross-examination by defence attorney Stephen Rosen, the witness admitted that he had lied about a number of issues relevant to his testimony.Among them was the fact that he has used several different names and false documents as identification to enter the United States illegally. Twice deported from the US, the witness is currently serving a five- to seven-year sentence for his last illegal re-entry into the US. He is also facing a 30-year to life sentence for murder, and for which he is seeking to enter a plea bargain arrangement with US authorities.The hearing ended abruptly after the witness told the court that prosecutors did not prepare him to testify, nor had they gone over the evidence with him.“This may be a good time for us to stop,” an obviously surprised Rosen recommended to Judge Robert Patterson.Speaking outside the courthouse at the end of the day’s proceedings, Rosen and colleague defence attorney Frank Dotadado said they were pleased.“The witness has been totally discredited,” Rosen said.Yesterday’s evidentiary hearing came out of an order by Judge Patterson to hear from previously unnamed prosecution witnesses who had painted Coke as a murderous drug lord who ruled the notorious Shower Posse with an iron fist.Prosecutors are trying to convince judge Patterson that Coke should be given the maximum 23-year prison sentence. However, the prosecution has indicated that they would be willing to settle for an 18-year sentence.Coke, who was extradited to the US in June 2010 following a month-long manhunt preceded by three days of gunbattles that left more than 70 civilians and one Jamaica Defence Force soldier dead in Tivoli Gardens, pleaded guilty last year to racketeering and conspiracy charges — much lesser charges than for which he was extradited.The deaths occurred after thugs loyal to Coke engaged police and soldiers who sought to enter a barricaded Tivoli Gardens in May 2010 to serve an arrest warrant on Coke. Coke escaped the dragnet but was captured nearly a month later while being chauffeured into Kingston by firebrand Pastor Al Miller.He waived his right to an extradition hearing in Jamaica and was flown to the US the following day.Another witness is expected to take the stand today. The hearing is expected to end tomorrow, after which Coke will either be sentenced or a date set for his sentencing.Jamaica Observercenter_img Share Tweet Sharelast_img read more

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