$19.71 Billion Growth in Global Biochip Market 2020-2024 | North America to Offer Significant…

first_img Previous articleMadison Square Garden Sports Corp. Reports Fiscal 2021 Second Quarter ResultsNext articleGPD Companies, Inc. Announces Launch of $75 Million Add-on Offering of Senior Secured Notes Digital AIM Web Support TAGS  Local NewsBusiness Facebook By Digital AIM Web Support – February 3, 2021 Pinterest WhatsApp $19.71 Billion Growth in Global Biochip Market 2020-2024 | North America to Offer Significant Opportunities | Technaviocenter_img Facebook Technavio has announced its latest market research report titled Global Biochip Market 2020-2024 Twitter Twitter Pinterest WhatsApplast_img read more

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Interest running high for Halifax agencies

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Mom sentenced for toddler’s murder

first_imgRolon’s attorney, Edward Murphy, said he believed his client’s conviction will be overturned on appeal and that she will get a new trial. “Normally, I don’t feel this way about convictions. I don’t this strongly, but I do in this case because I really believe the court made an erroneous ruling in denying the motion to dismiss the murder charge after the prosecution rested and giving a jury instruction that they could find her guilty as an aider and abettor even though she essentially did nothing,” Murphy said after the sentencing. Prosecutor Mary Murray declined to comment. Authorities said the child was killed April 21, 2003, at Rolon’s Lancaster condominium and remained there about a day before being taken away by Lopez in his van. Lopez drove to Bassett in the east San Gabriel Valley to visit his friend and was found two days later with the child’s body in the van, parked at Bassett Park. Rolon’s six other children, ranging then in age from 13 years to 4 months, were placed in protective custody. Her four oldest children were from other relationships, authorities said. The youngest three, including Isaac, were from a relationship with Lopez, who had been living in Des Moines, Iowa, but returned to Lancaster two or three weeks before Isaac was killed. A confidential county auditor-control report faulted social workers for poor oversight, incompetence and numerous policy violations in returning the boy to his parents’ care. Lopez and Rolon had at least a 10-year history with the Department of Children and Family Services, with Lopez being convicted of spousal abuse and of abusing one of Rolon’s sons. However, a series of policy violations and mistakes – including a case worker failing to read the family’s entire history of child abuse and neglect – led to Rolon’s seven children being returned to her, an internal county audit concluded. [email protected] (661) 267-5744160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! A Lancaster woman was sentenced Tuesday to 25 years to life in prison for the murder of her toddler son, who was beaten, poisoned with an over-the-counter antihistamine, suffocated and, after he was dead, burned in a tamale pot. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Michael Pastor said in his 20 years on the bench very few cases reached “this level of depravity and horror” as the circumstances of this case, said Jane Robison, spokeswoman for the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office. Sylvia Rolon, 44, was convicted in Los Angeles Superior Court in January of second-degree murder, assault on a child causing death and child abuse. Rolon’s boyfriend, Anthony Bill Lopez, 39, was convicted in June 2006 of torturing and murdering 22-month-old Isaac Lopez, and he was later sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. last_img read more

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Peterborough goalkeeper set for permanent Newport move

first_img1 Joe Day Peterborough goalkeeper Joe Day is set to complete a permanent switch to Newport County after a successful loan spell with the League Two side.The 24-year-old made 16 appearances for County before returning to London Road last week but he has now agreed to head back to south Wales in January.Day is expected to remain at Peterborough for the rest of the month but has already agreed personal terms with Justin Edinburgh’s side ahead of a New Year switch.He is set to become Newport’s record signing, with the fee believed to surpass the £20,000 they paid for striker Christian Jolley in 2013.last_img read more

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‘Be careful what you share online’

first_img8 October 2012With October being International Cyber Security Awareness Month, the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) has warned South Africans to be responsible with the information they share on internet, especially on social networks such as Twitter and Facebook.The Cyber Defence Research Group of the CSIR will be hosting a series of talks on cyber security awareness-related topics this month. The talks will include practical cyber security awareness tips, tricks and policies; mobile phone hacking, cyber terrorism and information warfare; live fire exercises; and social networking and social media.“Sharing personal information online about ourselves and those around us has become second nature, to the extent that we are not aware when we actually do it,” CSIR researcher Zama Dlamini said in a statement last week.“Our children, friends, partners, helpers and even colleagues have inadvertently posted pictures online; whether it is a picture of you at a team-building exercise, or a picture of your new car showing its registration number outside your house, which might also happen to have the address in bold. All this information can be used against you by cyber criminals.”Information that is regarded as private include – but is not limited to – bank and credit card numbers, income, ID number, full names, street address, phone numbers, e-mail address, names and addresses of children’s schools, and photos.Dlamini warned that this type of private information should not be shared with strangers nor made available online, as it can be easily accessed by cyber criminals.“This is the information that is often required to legitimately open new charge accounts, buy online or borrow money,” Dlamini said.“If cyber criminals were to get hold of it, they could use it to open accounts, buy online, and borrow money while pretending to be you. They can even marry you off to a stranger without your knowledge or consent.“Victims usually do not know that they have been victimised until collection agencies begin pursuing them to cover debts they did not even know they had.”According to Sipho Ngobeni, also a CSIR Researcher, there are many other tricks, like hacking, that cyber criminals can use to get people’s personal information.“Once they have achieved this, they could perform malicious activities such as infecting your computer with malware, which in turn can lead to your computer being used as a botnet (internet-connected computers with breached security defences that are controlled by a ‘botmaster’); steal confidential information that resides on your computer and perhaps sell it to the black market, and use your computer to launch further criminal activities,” Ngobeni said.The internet has no boundary; and therefore it is important that technology users are made aware of what could go wrong, as well as tips and tricks to protect themselves while online, Ngobeni added.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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Send Alex Gordon

It would have been close. Alex Gordon might have scored, particularly if he’d been in the mindset to do so all along. Or maybe not. I’m sure there will be Zapruder-film-type breakdowns, and I’ll look forward to seeing them. It would have been one hell of a moment: Gordon, 220 pounds, who looks like he could have been a strong safety at the University of Nebraska, bearing down on Buster Posey, the catcher whose season-ending injury in 2011 helped inspire baseball’s home-plate collisions rule.Your browser does not support iframes.Game 7 will leave us with that sense of what might have been. Partly because it involved the Kansas City Royals, who were making their first World Series appearance since 1985. But mostly I’m referring to that penultimate play: When Gordon hit what was officially scored as a single and wound up on third base because of defensive miscues by San Francisco Giants outfielders Gregor Blanco and Juan Perez. It seemed to take an eternity — it was actually just 13 seconds — but I was surprised that Gordon wasn’t rounding third base by the time the TV cameras returned to the infield.Here’s what I know: Gordon should have tried to score even if he was a heavy underdog to make it. It would have been the right move if he was safe even 30 percent of the time.Between 1969 and 1992 — I’m using this period because it better approximates baseball’s current run-scoring environment than the offensive bubble of the 1990s and aughts — a runner scored from third base with two outs about 27 percent of the time, according to the tables at Tangotiger.com. We should probably round that down a bit in this example. The Royals had Salvador Perez at the plate — a league-average hitter — and the light-hitting Mike Moustakas due up after that.More importantly, they were facing Madison Bumgarner. That Bumgarner had been so dominant in the World Series is not as relevant as you might think. There’s extremely little evidence for a “hot hand” in pitching: In-game performance tells you next to nothing about how the pitcher will fare in future at-bats. Instead, you should look toward longer-term averages. Still, I feel comfortable asserting that Bumgarner was an above-average pitcher at that moment: Certainly not the first guy you’d want to have on the mound if you were the opponent. So let’s round that 27 percent down to 25 percent.So, Gordon should have tried to score if he had even a 25 percent chance of being safe?It’s just a touch more complicated than that. With the Royals down 3-2, Gordon represented the tying run rather than the winning run. If he’s thrown out at home, the game’s over; it forecloses on the possibility of Perez scoring as the winning run, like with a walk-off homer. What was the probability of that? Perez homered in about 3 percent of his plate appearances this season, but he could also have scored in other ways — by doubling, for example, and then scoring on a base hit by Moustakas. We can turn to Tangotiger’s tables again, which suggest that a league-average batter has about a 6 percent chance (I’m rounding down slightly) of eventually scoring from home with two outs.So, after Gordon holds at third, he has a 25 percent chance of scoring. Six percent of the time, Perez (or pinch-runner Jarrod Dyson?) also scores, and the Royals win outright. The other 19 percent of the time, Gordon is the only Royal to score in the ninth and the game goes to extra innings. If we assume the Royals are even money to prevail in an extra-inning game, their chances of winning at that point are:6% + (19% * 50%)That works out to 15.5 percent. Not coincidentally, this matches FanGraphs’ in-game win probability for the Royals (after Gordon held at third) almost exactly.What if Gordon rounds third and tries to score? If he’s successful even 30 percent of the time, the Royals’ win probability is at least 15 percent — a 30 percent chance of Gordon scoring, multiplied by a 50 percent chance of the Royals winning in extra innings. But it’s slightly higher than that. The 30 percent of the time that Gordon scores, Perez still has his 6 percent chance of scoring the winning run in the ninth. That brings the Royals’ overall win probability up to about 16 percent.We’re splitting hairs. The point is that if even Gordon had been a 2-to-1 underdog to score, he should have tried.These decisions can be counterintuitive. Sometimes a strategy that’s successful less than 50 percent of the time — like splitting eights in blackjack — is still the right move because the alternative is even worse. In this case, the alternative involved trying to score against Bumgarner with your catcher at the plate and two outs, and then having to prevail in extra innings.It would have made for one of the best plays in baseball history. We’re talking about the tying run with two outs in the bottom of the ninth inning in Game 7 of the World Series: Even a sacrifice fly can be thrilling under those circumstances. But this would have been in a league with Bill Mazeroski and Kirk Gibson and Bill Buckner: under serious consideration for the greatest play of all-time. (The play already had a little Buckner in it, with Blanco’s and Perez’s misplays in the outfield.)Unlike any of those moments, it would have involved an incredibly gutsy decision. It’s an extraordinary play if Gordon scores. It’s an extraordinary play if there’s a collision at home plate — and baseball needs to decide whether to invoke the “Buster Posey Rule.”And if Gordon were thrown out, it would have been the most extraordinary way to lose a game in the history of baseball.CORRECTION (Oct. 30, 11:14 a.m.): A previous version of this article misstated the first name of a Kansas City Royals catcher. He is Salvador Perez, not Santiago Perez. read more

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Tiger Woods May Not Get A Better Shot At Another Green Jacket

2016Danny Willett—————— Masters winners do their best work from tee to greenStrokes gained rankings by category for Masters Tournament winners during the seasons they won, 2004-18 As the world’s greatest golfers convene in Augusta, Georgia, this week for the Masters, it’s time for every sports fan’s annual rite of spring: wild speculation about whether Tiger Woods can add a fifth green jacket to his closet. Picking Woods used to be a trendy bet; then it began to feel like a totally futile exercise. Well after he last won the event in 2005, there was a period when Woods was in the news constantly for everything except golf success. In fact, it wasn’t too long ago that Woods’s relevance as a winning golfer seemed finished, along with his bid to chase down Jack Nicklaus’s record for all-time majors won.But that all changed last season, when Woods put everything back together again to finish eighth on the PGA Tour money list and win the season-ending Tour Championship in September. Now Woods is back, in his best position in years to win another Masters. According to VegasInsider, Woods has the third-best odds of any player to win this weekend; he’s also playing even more inspired golf than he did during last year’s comeback campaign. But at age 43, will this be one of Woods’s last chances to win at Augusta before his days of being a viable champion are over?Certainly, Tiger has been outplaying many of his much younger rivals these past few seasons. Since the end of his lost 2017 campaign, Woods ranks sixth among qualified1Minimum 30 total rounds measured by ShotLink, the PGA Tour’s real-time scoring system. PGA Tour players in total strokes gained per round, trailing only Dustin Johnson, Justin Thomas, Justin Rose, Rory McIlroy and Tommy Fleetwood. He’s mostly regained his old mastery of irons on approach shots and still has some of the game’s best feel for shots around the green. In terms of strokes gained, Woods is picking up 1.67 shots (relative to the average player) per round so far in 2019, an even better mark than the 1.60 he posted last season — which itself was easily his best performance in five years.One of the most impressive aspects of Woods’s early play this season has been improved accuracy off the tee. According to the PGA Tour, Woods has hit 65.2 percent of possible fairways on his drives this season, which ranks 54th out of 214 qualified players. That might not sound amazing, but by Woods’s standards, it is ultraprecise accuracy. Last year, he hit only 59.4 percent of fairways, which ranked him 127th, and he struggled to break 55 percent over the four injury-plagued seasons before that. (Even during his really great pre-scandal/injury seasons, hitting fairways was an Achilles’ heel. In 2007, when he made the most money playing golf of his career, Woods ranked 152nd in driving accuracy and failed to hit 60 percent of fairways.) When Woods is scuffling, the first indication is often a wayward drive that requires subsequent artistry just to make par.With the help of that improved accuracy, Woods now ranks 72nd in strokes gained on drives this year — he was 100th last year — and ninth in strokes gained from the tee to the green, picking up 1.48 shots per round before ever setting his spikes on the putting surface. Classic Tiger was always a tee-to-green monster, ranking either first or second in the category every healthy season from 2006 to 2013, so his strong performance in that category this year is another signal that Woods is returning to vintage form.It’s also a very good sign for his chances at Augusta. That’s because, as Todd Schneider wrote about for FiveThirtyEight a few years ago, the Masters often comes down to a player’s skills with the long clubs — contrary to the tournament’s reputation for being a putting contest.Great PGA Tour players generally assert themselves most on approach shots and drives anyway, gaining about 4 strokes relative to average from tee to green for every extra shot they pick up on putts. But the recent history of Masters winners also suggests that a great long game is the true prerequisite for winning the green jacket. The average winner since strokes gained was first tracked in 2004 (excluding the 2016 and 2017 winners, Danny Willett and Sergio Garcia, because they lacked enough PGA Tour rounds to qualify for official leaderboards) ranked only about 86th in putting performance per round but 35th in strokes gained off the tee, 32nd in strokes gained on approach shots and 18th in total strokes gained from tee to green. 2008Trevor Immelman116501131191113 2018Patrick Reed104742297224 Strokes gained tee-to-green was the top category (or tied for the top) for 46 percent of the Masters winners over that span,2No other category was above 38 percent. and 62 percent of winners ranked among the Top 10 in the statistic — like Woods does this year. (This is consistent with my previous research that driving distance and approach accuracy are the two secret weapons players can possess at Augusta, causing them to play better in the Masters than their overall scoring average would predict.)I haven’t mentioned Tiger’s putting numbers yet, and with good reason. Woods used to be the greatest putter in the world, but so far this season he ranks just 74th in strokes gained with the flatstick, adding only 0.19 shots above average per round. Last year, he was better — 48th on tour — though he still wasn’t the putting maestro who once showed me and countless others the fundamentals of a great stroke. However, Augusta has frequently seen putters who rank far worse than Woods win during the era of detailed PGA Tour tracking data. (In fact, more than half of qualified Masters winners since 2004 have ranked worse than 78th in putting.) Putting performance is so random from year to year — much less from tournament to tournament or even round to round — that it’s a lot easier for a good tee-to-green player to get hot on the green for a weekend than for a good putter to suddenly have an uncharacteristically amazing weekend off the tee.Because of all this, it’s not hard to understand why Woods is a strong 12-to-1 bet to win the Masters. But it’s also not hard to imagine that this could be the 43-year-old’s last, best chance to win another green jacket. Using our research on historical major winners from a few years ago, here’s what the aging curve for championship golfers looks like: 2017Sergio García—————— 2015Jordan Spieth15117492 2007Zach Johnson613016460513 2013Adam Scott21677510811 2012Bubba Watson1598431606 2011Charl Schwartzel224564199620 Average34.531.970.018.486.121.2 2009Ángel Cabrera3748169636351 2014Bubba Watson2476371098 2005Tiger Woods44128451 YearMasters WinnerOff TeeApproachAround GreenTee to GreenPuttingTotal 2006Phil Mickelson124664405 PGA Tour Rank 2010Phil Mickelson66532513312 Garcia and Willett didn’t play enough rounds to qualify for the PGA Tour’s rankings during their Masters-winning seasons.Source: PGAtour.com 2004Phil Mickelson7224351289 That spike in wins for players in their early 40s came from 42-year-olds Ernie Els, Darren Clarke, Payne Stewart, Tom Kite and Gary Player, and it was the last actual uptick on the chart — and Woods is now on the wrong side of it. Jack Nicklaus famously won his final major at age 46, but most great golfers are largely done winning by their early to mid-40s. And the game has only gotten younger in the twilight of Woods’s career; while the average major-winner in our data set above (through 2014) was 31.9, that number is just 29.6 in the years since. With his own early career dominance and popularity, Woods has inspired a younger generation of gifted golfers that he now must do battle with.Woods is a special talent and in the conversation for the greatest golfer ever.3Even though most fans still give Nicklaus the nod. He’s playing as well heading into Augusta as he has in a long time and excelling in exactly the right categories. But between aging effects and his own injury history, he may never have a better shot at winning another Masters than he does right now. Once upon a time, Tiger was legendary for pouncing on every opportunity left in front of him. We’ll just have to see if he can summon that ability yet again. read more

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