India learnt their lessons after foolish cricket on Day 1: Ravi Shastri

first_imgIndia created history at the Adelaide Oval on Monday when they defeated Australia in the opening Test by 31 runs.India crushed a lower-order insurrection to secure a nerve-jangling victory, raising the South Asian nation’s hopes of a breakthrough series win Down Under.Team India coach Ravi Shastri was a happy man after India’s first win in a Test series-opener in Australia.”Very, very happy because it was a tough Test match this. The boys showed patience, discipline today. They stuck to their task in pretty good batting conditions and in the end we won the Test match by 31 runs,” Shastri told Sony after the end of the match.When asked about what the win means for the team, Shastri said, “We lost the first Test in England by 31, lost the first Test in South Africa by 60-70, so this is a very good feeling for the boys to come out on top.”The tourists dispatched Australia’s last four batsmen in the middle session of the final day at Adelaide Oval to send India’s travelling fans into raptures in the sparse fifth day crowd.Faced with a docile wicket and tenacious tail-end slogging, Virat Kohli’s team bowled with patience and determination to claim India’s first win in the country since Anil Kumble’s men beat a Ricky Ponting-led Australia by 72 runs in Perth in 2008.Ravichandran Ashwin took the final wicket of Josh Hazlewood for 13 to dismiss Australia for 291, with Nathan Lyon unbeaten on 38 after a valiant chase of 323 for victory.The Indian men’s cricket team coach though didn’t want to gloss over the cracks in euphoria of victory. He lauded the Indian batsmen for learning from their mistakes, especially Pujara for his superhuman effort with the bat.advertisement”When you get off to a good start, there’s belief. Even though we batted poorly in the first innings from the top order. There was some rash shots played in the first innings, that was foolish cricket, but they learnt from it. Pujara was absolutely magnificent, we’ve asked him to be a little more upright to counter bounce in these conditions,” Shastri said.Shastri was so impressed with India’s performance that he plans to the cricketers a few days off.”They have to rest up, to hell with the nets. You just come there, mark your attendance and get away to the hotel. We know the Perth track is quick, it’s a drop in surface, there’ll be something there for the fast bowlers. They need rest,” Shastri said.Shastri had special praise reserved for his bowlers too, saying that their ‘discipline’ has bode well for the team.Mohammed Shami finished with five wickets from the game, while Jasprit Bumrah and Ashwin both took six wickets. Ishant Sharma, who took three wickets in the match, started the ball rolling for India by taking Travis Head’s wicket for 14 in the morning of day five.”I thought the bowlers were brilliant in the first innings, defending 250, the discipline was magnificent. They’ve worked on it, it’s not come in overnight. As a bowling unit, when you show that discipline, it doesn’t matter which side you play against. You will be successful.”(With inputs from Reuters)Also Read | Virat Kohli sets sights on series triumph after historic Adelaide victoryAlso Read | India thoroughly deserved to win, we did not take our chances: Tim Painelast_img read more

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Could Toronto van attack signal more reasoned social media Experts are divided

first_imgTORONTO – Within minutes after a white van hopped the sidewalk and began mowing down pedestrians on a Toronto street, photographs and videos of the incident began pouring onto social media platforms.Facebook and Twitter became some of the earliest sources for many Canadians looking for a glimpse into the havoc of a breaking news event, but social media analyst Bruce Cameron sensed a different tone to their reactions.Fewer people seemed willing to jump to conclusions based on what little they knew about the man suspected to be the van’s driver on Monday, he said.Less than a day later, Alek Minassian was charged with 10 counts of first-degree murder.While social media was alight with comments about the incident shortly after it happened, Cameron said generally speaking he felt there was a greater restraint over sharing unverified information, compared to other cases in recent memory. He said it could be a sign of growing skepticism towards what’s being shared online.“We’re entering a stage where the initial glow and allure of social media has faded somewhat,” he suggested.In the wake of revelations around Cambridge Analytica, the political consultancy firm embroiled in accusations over harvesting private Facebook data, Cameron believe there’s a tangible change afoot in the weight people give their social media news feeds.“In the next year or two, we’re going to enter a more mature phase of how we use and digest social media,” he said.“This (incident) may well be looked back at as an example where the worst impact of social media didn’t come to pass.”It’s an optimistic prediction that not every social media observer considers realistic.Jeffrey Dvorkin, director of journalism at the University of Toronto’s Scarborough campus, said if anything, the Toronto van attack was further proof alt-right activists will use any opportunity to fuel speculation about terrorism designed to further their cause.“There may have been a moment of restraint by virtue of the fact this was such a horrific and unusual act of violence — but my guess is that it will resume in the usual manner in a few days,” he said.“The conspiracy theorists will start to reassert themselves shortly, once the initial horror has either passed or sunk in more deeply.”Dvorkin also questioned the media outlets who chose to broadcast smartphone videos showing Toronto police arresting the van’s driver. He also felt it unnecessary for outlets to run graphic images of the crime scene.“Even a few years ago, many media organizations would not have allowed that,” he said.“But now it’s the idea that if the whole town’s talking about it, it must be news.”Ryan Scrivens, an extremism researcher at Concordia University, suggested that news coverage also drove the conversations on social media. He took issue with how breaking news channels interviewed eyewitnesses who speculated about terrorism and the description of the suspect.He said even in his position as an experienced professional studying terror cells, he is usually careful not to draw conclusions — but he had to check his cautiousness against a gut reaction, which was to immediately think of terrorism.“I didn’t want to jump the gun, but it did fit the bill,” he said.Scrivens suggested that others ignore the tendency to draw conclusions before the facts come out.“We have to wait for the information,” he said.“It’s hard, because on social media we’re just being bombarded with constant updates. I think we just need to cool off.”Follow @dfriend on Twitter.last_img read more

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