CLC debates du Lac changes

first_imgThe Campus Life Council (CLC) debated recommendations for du Lac revisions Monday, specifically focusing on medical amnesty and clarification of language.“We wanted this in written form for two reasons,” student body president Grant Schmidt said. “One is to have this on record for future reference, and two, we wanted a response from [Vice President for Student Affairs Fr. Mark Poorman] as to why or why not these recommendations would be adopted.” The Council passed four resolutions to be sent to Office of Residence Life and Housing (ORLH) after considerable discussion.  “Having the guidelines there makes it easier to make a decision in a situation where student is already irrational,” Student Senate representative Claire Sokas said. “You are not able to weigh the pros and cons unless you know what is going to happen.” The Council focused on the recommendation for a medical amnesty policy. Debate was raised over whether a rigid policy should be recommended, or if ORLH should present a more formal statement similar to an honor code. This discussion was not resolved and remains on the table for future CLC meetings.CLC members also recommended a serious consideration of the language used when ORLH discusses sanctions in du Lac. The Council will ask that the du Lac revisions include changing the word “shall” to the word “may” to clarify various texts. Changing the words would allow a more “case-by-case” judgment, Brellenthin said.  Student representative John DeLacio said many freshmen specifically do not know or understand the University’s position on medical amnesty, and a policy supported by the ORLH would send a “strong message” on this subject. Schmidt said Student Senate has already passed a resolution recommending the University adopt a formal medical amnesty policy.  The Council members also unanimously supported a recommendation for continuing service hours as a sanction, an issue that Kirk specifically asked CLC to consider.center_img CLC members also wanted to distinguish between the jurisdictions of Indiana state law and the laws of other nations and states where students may reside. They specifically suggested du Lac should clarify this distinction. “We realize that we want this to be educative,” chief of staff Ryan Brellenthin said. “We want it to change student behavior so they can actively seek out help for their friends.”  This recommendation was previously discussed when Associate Vice President for Residence Life Bill Kirk said part of the du Lac revisions would clarify the language to match up with the actions of ORLH.  Other recommendations for future meetings address first-time incidents of intoxication within a student’s residence hall, discipline at lower administrative levels, undergraduate tailgating policy and the issue of drinking games in dorms. “The spirit of this recommendation is to clarify that students are not subject to Indiana state law at all times but to the law of the nation or state where they are residing,” Brellenthin said.  The recommendation states the change should be made to “broaden the options of the Office of Residence Life and Housing.”  “It seems like a small change,” Schmidt said. “But it is important.”last_img read more

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ND utilizes the iPad

first_imgAs the academic year kicks into high gear, many students have heard of the buzz surrounding the “iPad class.” Inside of Corey Angst’s project management class, the use of Apple’s popular gadget allows students to take advantage of the iPad’s capabilities in a unique way. Crutchfield said that after Angst’s class concludes, another pilot class from either First Year of Studies, the Law School or the CSLC will begin using iPads in their instruction.  These classes are the result of Notre Dame’s e-publishing working group, which formed in March as a partnership between the Office of Information Technologies’ Academic Technologies, Hesburgh Libraries, the Hammes Notre Dame Bookstore, the Office of Institutional Equity, the Office of Sustainability, the Mendoza College of Business (MCOB), the Law School and the Center for the Study of Languages and Cultures (CSLC).  In contrast with those failed pilots, Angst has received virtually no complaints about the iPads and their role in the class. “Students work on real-world projects in this team-based course,” Angst said. “Besides using the iPad as an e-reader, they are probably using shared calendars to coordinate their schedules and about half the students type notes on their iPads during class.” Angst is heading a research project that will assess the effectiveness of e-readers as classroom resources and incorporate data from his class and future pilot courses. “You can make educated guesses about how the technology will work out, but until you get it in the hands of real people, in real courses you don’t know the full capabilities and limitations of it,” Crutchfield said. The $499 iPads were funded by OIT, Hesburgh Libraries, MCOB, the Law School and the CSLC, allowing students to use them at no personal cost.  Angst and Crutchfield said the iPad’s color display, multimedia capabilities and Internet accessibility give it an advantage over other black-and-white e-readers that have been unsuccessfully piloted at other universities. “This is still a project management course,” Angst said. “But it’s the first part of a project that we’ll continue to study as iPads are distributed to different students.” “All these groups had seen the transition from printed text to digital texts for years,” Crutchfield said. “We knew the iPad was coming out last April which would help increase acceptance of e-readers and e-books, and the iPad is multifunctional enough to justify its cost.” Academic technologies consultant Jon Crutchfield said the group’s main goal is to determine what an “e-publishing ecosystem” would look like at Notre Dame. “I’m actually surprised how much I like reading our textbook from the iPad,” senior Jordan Rockwell said. “Another awesome feature is an app called ‘Dropbox’ that syncs your files added from any computer to the iPad so you can instantly access your own files or Professor Angst’s.” The seven-week course is the first of several pilot classes that will use 50 University-owned iPads as means to determine the role e-publishing technology should play in the classroom, Angst, assistant professor of management, said.  “The other courses will try to replicate Professor Angst’s research methodology in order to provide him with a rich data set from a diverse group of students of different majors and age groups,” Crutchfield said. The iPads may be tested in the future in different settings at Notre Dame, such as making iPads available in the library for class-related videos, Crutchfield said.  “We are interested in finding out how e-publishing technology will impact how people create, distribute, read and share content in terms of courses, library loans and the bookstore,” Crutchfield said. Crutchfield said the sustainability of e-reader technology would be assessed in terms of savings from e-books, energy efficiency and the recyclability of iPads. Angst’s students also responded positively to the transition to a paperless, iPad-based course.last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s to host ‘Tailgate’

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Student Activites Board (SAB) will host a Twilight Tailgate on Library Green this Thursday at 9 p.m. “Twilight Tailgate has been a traditional event each year that has varied from outdoor movies to concerts,” SAB president Allie Courtney said. This year, SAB will be screening “Toy Story 3” and serving caramel apples, apple cider, hot cocoa and popcorn. “Toy Story 3” was chosen because it was most readily available through Swank Motion Pictures Incorporated, the company through which SAB purchases movies, Courtney said. “We also picked ‘Toy Story 3′ because of its popularity this summer and it seems like a movie that fits perfectly with the culture on campus,” she said. The event is free to all Saint Mary’s, Notre Dame and Holy Cross students. The first 400 students to arrive will receive a free fleece blanket. SAB receives a certain allotment of money from the Student Government Association (SGA) a year in order to pay for student events, Courtney said. Courtney said the Board has been trying to create new events and enhance old ones, and that she wants SAB to establish a name on campus. “SAB’s goal is to increase participation, variety and volume at all of this year’s events,” Courtney said. SAB is currently planning an Oktoberfest on campus, a screening of the sixth Harry Potter film before the new Harry Potter movie release and arranging artists for Spring Tostal. “This is our second big event of the year,” Courtney said. “We are really excited and hope a lot of people come out.”last_img read more

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Sexual assault reported

first_imgNotre Dame Security Police (NDSP) alerted students in an email Wednesday night that a sexual crime occurred over the weekend. Police said a student was “forcibly fondled” at a social gathering in a campus residence hall Friday night. A third party reported the incident to NDSP on Tuesday. Police advised students to remain alert of their surroundings and watch out for friends in order to reduce the chance of sexual assault. “Please continue to keep in mind that sexual assault can happen to anyone at any time, and that college students are more likely to be assaulted by an acquaintance, meaning that the person perpetrating the assault could be part of the campus community,” the email stated.last_img read more

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International Festival Week celebrates culture

first_imgNotre Dame students don’t need to use their passports to experience foreign cultures this week, as they can soak in global traditions and customs during International Festival Week. McKenna Pencak, assistant director for education and outreach for International Student Services and Activities (ISSA), said the Festival features a variety of cultures from around the world. The events began last Saturday and continues through this Sunday. “Basically it’s just a week to celebrate international students and the international student community, as well as the entire Notre Dame community and everyone that has different backgrounds and cultural heritages,” she said. Pencak said International Festival Week began as a cultural celebration and performance and is now a celebration of the University’s international community. “We have over 900 international students from about 90 countries, and this is a week to celebrate a variety of cultural heritages as well as our multicultural students,” she said. “Also, it’s great because it’s not only ISSA, it’s a collaboration with other departments and organizations on campus. We work to make sure everyone is included and that as many countries and cultures are represented as possible.” The week’s primary event, the International Festival, has been held for over 40 years and originally was the event’s only activity, Pencak said. The Festival, which will be held today from 6 to 8 p.m. in the LaFortune Student Center Ballroom, will feature performances from students and campus cultural organizations, as well as international desserts. Pencak said the performances will include a Bollywood dance, a Chinese song and a Japanese tea ceremony. There also will be activity tables and a question and answer session. The Week also features an International Children’s Festival, Pencak said. “That is basically a children’s version of the International Festival, and it’s free, and we work with University Village, the married student housing,” she said. “We’re going to be doing international arts and crafts.” Fischer O’Hara Grace Graduate Residences are usually active in International Festival Week because of the University’s high number of international graduate students, Pencak said. “They are hosting a great event with [associate professor of painting and drawing] Fr. Martin Nguyen on Friday,” she said. “There’s going to be dinner and dessert and then everyone’s going to go to Holy Cross annex to tour Fr. Martin Nguyen’s [art] studio.” Pencak said overall student participation for the International Festival Week is typically high. “It’s really fun because it’s a way for international and national students to get together and celebrate different cultures and celebrate where they’re from,” she said. “It’s really neat to see everyone participating and talking about his or her home countries and cultures and cultural heritages.”last_img read more

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Notre Dame welcomes new rectors to campus

first_imgIn some campus residence halls, freshmen and transfer students won’t be the only new residents this week. New rectors will welcome students in Breen-Phillips Hall, Farley Hall, Keenan Hall, Stanford Hall and Zahm House as they transition into their jobs as dorm leaders. Associate Vice President for Residential Life Heather Rakoczy Russell said rectors have four important roles within their dorms: pastoral leader, chief administrator, community builder and university resource. Backgrounds in each of these areas are the criteria the University uses to hire new rectors, she said. “We’re looking for people who are trained in theology, ministry, education – specifically higher education – and that they have a sense of themselves and their work and mission in ministry, education, student development and formation of the whole person,” Russell said. Scott Opperman, rector of Zahm House and a former Notre Dame graduate student, said the intersection of all these areas influenced his decision to apply to be a rector at the University. “I will try to integrate academics and spirituality into residence life, and Notre Dame does that very well already,” Opperman said. “I believe in the Holy Cross charism and mission that the University of Notre Dame has … I love Notre Dame so much so it’s just a perfect fit for me.” Stephan Johnson, rector of Stanford Hall, said working with young people is one of the best parts of his job. “I feel really fortunate to be here, and I think it’s a tremendous calling to have an opportunity to affect so many of God’s great children,” Johnson said. “Every time I see them, they inspire me, and they give me personally a sense of hope about the world.” Sr. Mary Catherine McNamara, rector of Breen-Phillips Hall, is a Sister of the Incarnate Word and Blessed Sacrament, and she said in a statement that being a rector has great religious significance for her. “Simply put, it is a ‘God-thing,’” she said. “I believe God is inviting me to accept the challenge and embrace the opportunity to carry on the rich tradition of serving as Rector of Breen-Phillips Hall. It seems to be a natural next step on my journey of ministry.” Although previous ties to Notre Dame are not required, some rectors have a long history with the University. Elizabeth Moriarty, rector of Farley Hall, lived in Farley as an undergraduate and also received a master’s degree in divinity from the University. “I am humbled to be returning to Notre Dame, yet again, to be the next rector of Farley Hall, which I believe is the result of the divine intervention of my dear friend and confirmation sponsor, Sr. Jean Lenz,” she said in a statement. Lenz passed away in January. Noel Terranova, rector of Keenan Hall, is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in theology at Notre Dame. He said in a statement he hopes his faith will guide him to be a good leader in his dorm. “I feel it is a noble calling to guide young people through a transitional period in their adult development that will have a deep and formative impact on how they live the rest of their lives,” Terranova said. “I pray that Spirit will guide me so that the men of Keenan will know me as a strong leader, with firm convictions and a gentle heart.” Opperman said he looks forward to promoting a welcoming culture in Zahm House and celebrating the dorm’s 75th anniversary this year. “We’re going to strive to be the most inclusive and welcoming Notre Dame residential community,” Opperman said. “Another fundamental thing is we have to respect, care for and love ourselves and others, and we’re going to do that in an exceptional way.” Johnson said building community is also important for him in Stanford Hall, and he is working to institute a big brother program within the dorm. But his first goal is to emphasize service, he said. “My primary goal is that we become known all over campus as the hall that dedicates itself to serving others,” Johnson said. “One of the themes of our year is ‘Fend for Others.’ We’re going to get the guys out of the dorm and into some of the impoverished areas in our community and even challenge them to go beyond that.” Russell said she is impressed with this year’s group of new rectors, and she is excited to see what they will accomplish. “I am delighted,” she said. “What all of these rectors share in common is a deep connection to Notre Dame.”last_img read more

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Gender Relations Center educates ND about stalking

first_imgThe Gender Relations Center (GRC) wants students to know how to protect themselves from unwanted attention. As part of National Stalking Awareness Month, the Center is hosting a campaign titled “Stalking: Know it. Name it. Stop it.” Emmanuel Cannady, assistant director of outreach services at the GRC, said the campaign aims to educate people about stalking in order to reduce its prevalence. “Stalking takes many different forms and is underreported,” he said. “The definition of stalking has more to do with impact versus intent. Any form of unwanted contact that causes anxiety and fear is stalking.” GRC representatives will man informational tables in North Dining Hall, South Dining Hall and the LaFortune Student Center, Cannady said. The Center will also hang posters with stalking facts and statistics in residence halls. Stalking takes many forms and is difficult to define, Cannady said. It can include sending unwanted gifts, texts, phone calls, pictures or contact on social media sites. “There can be many mixed messages about what exactly stalking is, but the key word is ‘unwanted,’” Cannady said. The majority of victims are stalked by someone they know, Cannady said. Sixty-six percent of female victims and 41 percent of male victims are stalked by a former or current partner. One in six women and one in 19 men have been stalked. “Men and women both underreport the crime, but for different reasons,” Cannady said. “Men tend to see stalking as merely annoying, not a potential threat, whereas women actually fear reporting the crime.” Stalking transcends all 50 states, Cannady said, but many people are uninformed about its seriousness. Two-thirds of perpetrators stalk their victims once a week, and many more stalk their victims daily. Stalkers fit no psychological profile, he said. Many move locations and are difficult to track. Cannady said victims may suffer from anxiety, insomnia, depression and changes in behavior. He said friends should look out for these signs in one another. “If you think you are being stalked, keep a log of all contact,” Cannady said. “This can be used for evidence. Be aware of who has access to your accounts on social media. If you think you are being stalked, do not hesitate to call NDSP [Notre Dame Security Police].”,The Gender Relations Center (GRC) wants students to know how to protect themselves from unwanted attention. As part of National Stalking Awareness Month, the Center is hosting a campaign titled “Stalking: Know it. Name it. Stop it.” Emmanuel Cannady, assistant director of outreach services at the GRC, said the campaign aims to educate people about stalking in order to reduce its prevalence. “Stalking takes many different forms and is underreported,” he said. “The definition of stalking has more to do with impact versus intent. Any form of unwanted contact that causes anxiety and fear is stalking.” GRC representatives will man informational tables in North Dining Hall, South Dining Hall and the LaFortune Student Center, Cannady said. The Center will also hang posters with stalking facts and statistics in residence halls. Stalking takes many forms and is difficult to define, Cannady said. It can include sending unwanted gifts, texts, phone calls, pictures or contact on social media sites. “There can be many mixed messages about what exactly stalking is, but the key word is ‘unwanted,’” Cannady said. The majority of victims are stalked by someone they know, Cannady said. Sixty-six percent of female victims and 41 percent of male victims are stalked by a former or current partner. One in six women and one in 19 men have been stalked. “Men and women both underreport the crime, but for different reasons,” Cannady said. “Men tend to see stalking as merely annoying, not a potential threat, whereas women actually fear reporting the crime.” Stalking transcends all 50 states, Cannady said, but many people are uninformed about its seriousness. Two-thirds of perpetrators stalk their victims once a week, and many more stalk their victims daily. Stalkers fit no psychological profile, he said. Many move locations and are difficult to track. Cannady said victims may suffer from anxiety, insomnia, depression and changes in behavior. He said friends should look out for these signs in one another. “If you think you are being stalked, keep a log of all contact,” Cannady said. “This can be used for evidence. Be aware of who has access to your accounts on social media. If you think you are being stalked, do not hesitate to call NDSP [Notre Dame Security Police].”last_img read more

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SMC writing center hosts workshops for students

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Writing Center will be presenting four workshops over the next four weeks to help students improve their writing skills.Director of the Writing Center Aaron Bremyer said the hour-long workshops will be led entirely by student tutors who work in the Center. He said each workshop will follow students through the writing process.“There was a need,” he said. “In speaking with professors across campus, we felt like there were a lot of professors who were really happy to have this sort of conversation from experienced tutors.”Bremyer said he hopes that through the workshops, students will not only learn more about the process itself but also in the resources the Writing Center has to offer.“I think a lot of people misunderstand what the Writing Center is about,” he said. “A lot of people think you come to the Center and you sit with a tutor and she fixes [your paper]. That’s not at all what we do. In fact, that would be an unethical approach to collaborating with students. I thought this sort of discussion could help more students understand that some of our very best tutorials occur before anyone has written a word.”He said he wants students to think of writing as a gradual process rather than something that happens in one sitting.“I think [the workshops] are important because many students misunderstand the writing process or have developed bad habits,” he said. “We all have them. But this shows that the process should be spread out to avoid the last minute adrenaline-driven composition of a paper. … If we can get to people earlier, they’ve begun the writing process, and sometimes that first step is incredibly powerful because it allows people to be better prepared.”Because the workshops are peer-led, Bremyer said they will provide students with a role model for their writing.“It’s more powerful to have a peer whom [students] respect, a peer who has demonstrated that she is a successful writer on this campus,” he said. “I think it’s more powerful for students to see those types of women presenting these ideas.”Senior Nellie Petlick, one of the tutors at the Center who led Monday’s workshop, said despite the low turnout for the first workshop of the series, she believes the students who attended benefitted from the personal attention. She said students should continue to attend the workshops because they offer multiple perspectives on the writing process.“It’s good to get different perspectives sometimes, to hear from students who have been through who struggle with writing every day,” Petlick said. “[Tutors from the Writing Center] are not presenting ourselves as the authority on writing. … They can get a perspective that’s not just their professors, and we can talk about it in a different way that might be useful to them.”Petlick said she hopes through the workshops, students will learn to have more confidence in their writing abilities.“There’s no such thing as perfect writing,” she said. “It’s different for everybody. Even people who have been writing for decades are not perfect writers. We have a lot of women who come into the Center who want to apologize for their writing. … They shouldn’t think like that. Everyone is a good writer, and everyone can get better.“It’s always just trying to improve your own style and trying to make yourself the best writer you can be, but there’s no standard to which you should compare yourself.”The next three workshops are open to all students and will take place in 210 Madeleva Hall next Tuesday at 6:30 p.m.Tags: Saint Mary’s Writing Centerlast_img read more

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Student senate approves judicial council nominees, discusses Callisto usage

first_imgThe Notre Dame student senate approved new judicial council positions and discussed the implementation of Callisto for reporting sexual assaults at its meeting Wednesday.Judicial Council president Matt Ross presented his nominations for the new vice presidents of judicial council. He named freshman student Shady Girgis as vice president of elections and first-year student Myrofora Zambas as vice president of peer advocacy. With no debate nor objections, both nominees were named as vice presidents.Senate then moved on to its general orders, announcing three resolutions to bestow emeritus status on three past student-body representatives. Student body chief of staff for the past term Michael Markel, vice president Becca Blais and Student Body President Corey Robinson were all recognized.Lastly, two students presented two sexual assault awareness and prevention proposals to be instituted in Notre Dame’s 2017 academic year. Jade Martinez, student government’s director of health and wellness described Callisto Reporting Software, which allows students to report assailant information easily and confidentially.“Callisto sends these sexual assault reports directly to the Title IX coordinator for further investigation,” she said. “Names of assaulters can be matched using this software, offering the potential of a safer campus by prosecuting violators faster.”Martinez also stated that the committee is working to have this software installed by the fall, after solving its pricing ambiguity.Isabel Rooper, student government director of gender relations went on to promote aggregate data releases for Notre Dame’s sexual assault policy.“This push to release detailed information on sexual assaults would provide increased awareness and intervention in sexual assault occurrences on Notre Dame’s campus,” she said.The aggregate data released would include “the number of sexual violence reports filed, number of investigations opened, policy decisions, sanctions imposed and changes in these sanctions and length of each case,” Rooper said.This data would collect the information Notre Dame chooses to exclude in sexual assault surveys sent to students Rooper said.According to Rooper, currently, Notre Dame’s lack of standardization in data makes it difficult to compare our school to other universities around the nation.“Releasing aggregate data has the potential to make strides in sexual assault reporting, improving on current methods of both surveying and spreading awareness about the weight of Notre Dame’s, and every university’s, sexual assault problem,” she said.Presently, Rooper and Martinez were unsure if Holy Cross and St. Mary’s would join in Notre Dame’s movement to install Callisto reporting software and release aggregate data.Proceeding these presentations, there was no new business to attend. The senate agreed to adjourn the meeting with no obligations.Tags: aggregate data, Callisto, ND student senatelast_img read more

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Students distribute LGBT Pride flags, protest Pence’s commencement speech

first_imgMichael Yu | The Observer LGBT flags hang out the windows of a residence hall as a protest against Vice President Pence’s upcoming Commencement speech.On Wednesday, the first day of the event, Ricketts said, there was a massive amount of initial support due to the dedication of student organizers.“It was just a group of people who are like, this is really important to us,” he said. “And we’ve gotten a huge response. We’re almost out of flags and it’s the first day.”The event’s Facebook page urges students to hang these flags out their windows to demonstrate solidarity against Pence’s speech.Freshman Marisa Perino said she volunteered to help with the campaign because of Pence’s actions against the LGBT community.“[He] voted for bills that allowed businesses to discriminate based on religious freedom,” she said. “ … That’s also extremely discriminatory, and I feel like Notre Dame should not be supporting [him].”The event has not gone off without a hitch, organizers said, as those distributing flags at LaFortune Student Center were asked to stop by the Student Activities Office (SAO).“We were just sitting at a table, we had flags and a computer … I was passing out flags, everyone was super happy, there was no drama,” Perino said. “The director of activities for [LaFortune Student Center] came up to me and was super intimidating, and super condescending and said, ‘You need to leave, you can’t be here.’”Perino said she was told she could not distribute flags because she was not part of a sanctioned club event.“He said that all clubs need to reserve a table … and I was like ‘We’re not with a club,’” she said. “I’m an individual student handing these out on my own, and he was like, ‘You need to have it reserved, you can’t solicit here, every activity needs to be planned out.’ He didn’t understand this wasn’t an activity, just a private student. He wasn’t even willing to listen to anything.”Ron Grisoli, interim director of student activities facilities, said the students were asked to leave because they had not registered their distribution of flags.“Specific areas in LaFortune [Student Center] and around campus are designated for ‘tabling,’ or activities where recognized student groups may distribute anything from donuts, to t-shirts, to flags or petitions,” he said in an email. “Individual students not affiliated with a recognized student group may seek approval from the vice president for campus safety to hold a demonstration.  The reason the students were asked to leave yesterday had nothing to do with the nature of their activity, but rather because they were not affiliated with a recognized student group. … Only officially recognized student groups who submit their request for space and activities through [SAO] may use designated space in LaFortune [Student Center].”Despite this explanation, Perino said she still believed it was her right as a private student, who was not part of a club, to distribute these flags. Ricketts said it felt like the University was, to some degree, silencing the group.“It’s frustrating being a LGBT student at the University,” he said. “PrismND, the official Notre Dame group, isn’t allowed to do anything that could be construed as a political action. Officially, we’re not allowed to do anything, but when we do things as individuals we’re not allowed to do it, so it’s a really frustrating place to be. … It’s like the University doesn’t want us to speak at all, and that’s frustrating.”Despite this setback, Ricketts, Perino and others will continue to distribute flags out of the College Democrats office in LaFortune Student Center.Feedback had been overwhelmingly positive toward the event, Ricketts said, and they had received widespread support he believed could be sustained.“[There have been many] people who saw the [event] online … and were like, I want to be part of this,” he said. “Certainly lots of LGBT alumni who wished [a show of solidarity like this] could have happened during their time here, but plenty of allies too.”Tags: 2017 commencement, LGBT, Mike Pence, Pride flags Students passionate about LGBT voices at Notre Dame are coming together in an effort to find ways to protest this year’s Commencement speaker, Vice President Mike Pence. Fifth-year student Bryan Ricketts said this campaign is in response to the “hostility” Pence has expressed toward LGBT rights.“He’s, in the past, been against same-sex marriage because it harms people, which is demonstrably false and really offensive,” he said. “In addition to that, he passed a budget which supported funding for conversion therapy, which is also just a whole other level of harmful to LGBT people. So it feels pretty offensive to have him coming on campus [to] give a Commencement speech where he tells me how to go out into the world.”Ricketts and others came together and decided to distribute pride flags with the help of volunteers and alumni donations to send a message to Pence, he said.“A wonderful show of solidarity, this brought together alumni, current students and faculty who wanted to be a part of showing students on Notre Dame’s campus that this a place where they are welcome and appreciated,” Ricketts said.last_img read more

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