Corn Growers Joins Broad-Based Coalition for Action on a Federal GMO…

first_img Previous articleSmithfield’s Renewable Energy Commitment TangibleNext articleFebruary Weather Outlook: More of the Same Gary Truitt “GMO technology has fostered a revolution in American agriculture that has benefitted consumers in the United States and around the world. And with global population expected to grow from seven to nine billion by 2050, we will need 70 percent more food production to keep pace. A federal GMO labeling solution will provide a framework for the safe and continued use of technology that is essential to the future of our planet.” By Gary Truitt – Feb 6, 2014 A federal GMO labeling solution is needed that will protect consumers and ensure the safety of food ingredients made through the use of modern agricultural biotechnology: SHARE Coalition Members include: the AACC International/ American Phytopathological Society;  the American Bakers Association; the American Beverage Association; the American Farm Bureau Federation; the American Feed Industry Association; the American Frozen Food Institute; the American Seed Trade Association; the American Soybean Association; the American Sugarbeet Growers Association; the Biotechnology Industry Organization; the Corn Refiners Association; the Council for Responsible Nutrition; the Flavor & Extract Manufacturers Association; the Global Cold Chain Alliance; the Grocery Manufacturers Association; the International Dairy Foods Association; the National Association of Manufacturers; the National Association of Wheat Growers; the National Confectioners Association; the National Corn Growers Association; the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives; the National Fisheries Institute; the National Grain & Feed Association; the National Oilseed Processors Association; the National Restaurant Association; the National Turkey Federation; the North American Millers Association; the Snack Food Association; and the U.S. Beet Sugar Ass Corn Growers Joins Broad-Based Coalition for Action on a Federal GMO Labeling Solution Home Indiana Agriculture News Corn Growers Joins Broad-Based Coalition for Action on a Federal GMO Labeling… “Foods made with genetically modified ingredients are safe and have a number of important benefits for people and our planet,” said Pamela G. Bailey, president and CEO of the Grocery Manufacturers Association. “Our nation’s food safety and labeling laws should not be set by political campaigns or state and local legislatures, but by the FDA, the nation’s foremost food safety agency. Eliminate Confusion: Remove the confusion and uncertainty of a 50 state patchwork of GMO safety and labeling laws and affirm the FDA as the nation’s authority for the use and labeling of genetically modified food ingredients.Advance Food Safety: Require the FDA to conduct a safety review of all new GMO traits before they are introduced into commerce. FDA will be empowered to mandate the labeling of GMO food ingredients if the agency determines there is a health, safety or nutrition issue with an ingredient derived from a GMO.Inform Consumers: The FDA will establish federal standards for companies that want to voluntarily label their product for the absence-of or presence-of GMO food ingredients so that consumers clearly understand their choices in the marketplace.Provide Consistency: The FDA will define the term “natural” for its use on food and beverage products so that food and beverage companies and consumers have a consistent legal framework that will guide food labels and inform consumer choice. Facts About GMOsMany of the most influential regulatory agencies and organizations that study the safety of the food supply, including the U.S. Food & Drug Administration, the American Medical Association, the World Health Organization, Health Canada, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the National Academy of Sciences, have found genetically modified food ingredients are safe and there are no negative health effects associated with their use.GM technology adds desirable traits from nature, without introducing anything unnatural or using chemicals, so that food is more plentiful.GM technology is not new. In fact, it has been around for the past 20 years, and today, 70-80 percent of the foods we eat in the United States, both at home and away from home, contain ingredients that have been genetically modified.Ingredients grown using GM technology require fewer pesticides, less water and keep production costs down. In fact, GM technology helps reduce the price of crops used for food, such as corn, soybeans and sugar beets by as much as 15-30 percent.One in eight people among the world’s growing population of seven billion do not have enough to eat, and safe and effective methods of food production, like crops produced through GM technology, can help us feed the hungry and malnourished in developing nations around the world.The Coalition for Safe Affordable Food is dedicated to providing policy makers, media, consumers and all stakeholders with the facts about ingredients grown through GM technology. We are also an advocate for common sense policy solutions that will only further enhance the safety of the GM crops and protect the vital role they play in today’s modern global food supply chain. The coalition is comprised of American farmers and representatives from a diverse group of industry and non-governmental organizations. Facebook Twitter SHARE Facebook Twitter American farmers and representatives from a diverse group of almost thirty industry and non-governmental organizations today announced the formation of the Coalition for Safe Affordable Food and urged Congress to quickly seek a federal solution that would establish standards for the safety and labeling of food and beverage products made with genetically modified ingredients. “American families deserve safe, abundant and affordable food,” said NCGA President Martin Barbre. “America’s farmers rely on this proven technology to protect crops from insects, weeds and drought, enabling us to deliver on that promise and to do so through sustainable means. A federal solution on GMO labeling will bolster consumer confidence in the safety of American food by reaffirming the U.S. Food & Drug Administration’s role as the nation’s foremost authority on the use and labeling of foods containing genetically modified ingredients.”last_img read more

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IFB Farm Bill Education Begins for Hoosiers

first_img Farm bill regional meetingsIndiana Farm Bureau members and non-members are invited to attend one of the regional meetings this week designed to help farmers get a jumpstart on understanding the new farm bill. Two meetings are scheduled for Thursday, in Fulton County and at the Indiana State Fairgrounds, and one meeting will be at the Lawrence County Fairgrounds on Friday.Kyle Cline, National Policy Advisor for Indiana Farm Bureau said they want to get information to farmers now that details are being released.“The bill itself is almost a thousand pages so it’s quite complex. There are several new programs and election options that are available within the farm bill and the commodity program. Also there is a new crop insurance option, supplemental coverage option, so we wanted to get out there and provide that information early and at least get farmers familiar with these programs and get them to be thinking about this. Then we’ll also walk through some examples, farm case studies.”Cline says the focus will primarily be on the commodity and livestock programs of the farm bill.“April 15th is the tentative date for signups for the livestock indemnity program and the livestock forage disaster program, so that will be very much front and center for the discussion,” he told HAT. “The commodity programs, while the rules are still being written, we want to walk producers and others interested through those programs and what they might be able to expect.”John Anderson, deputy chief economist at the American Farm Bureau Federation, and Matt Erickson, economist at the American Farm Bureau Federation, will be the guest speakers.Cline adds “stay tuned” for additional dates sometime from summer to fall when IFB will continue its farm bill educational outreach.This week’s meeting are:North region – March 27, 9-11 a.m., Fulton County Fairgrounds Community Center, 1009 West 3rd St., Rochester, IN 46975Central region –  March 27, 2-4: p.m., The Glass Barn, Indiana State Fairgrounds, 1202 E. 38th St., Indianapolis, IN 46205South region – March 28, 9-11 a.m., Lawrence County Fairgrounds Expo Hall, 11265 US Hwy. 50 West, Bedford, IN 47421Learn more here in the HAT video: Home Indiana Agriculture News IFB Farm Bill Education Begins for Hoosiers Facebook Twitter SHARE Facebook Twitter SHARE Previous articleRail Congestion Pushes Ethanol Prices HigherNext articleSeed Consultants Names Regional Sales Manager Andy Eubank IFB Farm Bill Education Begins for Hoosiers By Andy Eubank – Mar 25, 2014 last_img read more

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Purdue Pesticide Programs Reorganized

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Purdue Pesticide Programs Reorganized Previous articleU.K. and U.S. Taking First Steps to Trade DealNext articleNew Master Farmers Know How to Survive Ag’s Tough Times Gary Truitt A reorganization of the Purdue Pesticide Programs (PPP) will enhance outreach to producers, applicators, agribusiness professionals and the general public with a renewed emphasis on educational programming, according to program administrator Fred Whitford.“We’re grateful that Cheri Janssen and Cindy Myers on our team have agreed to take on new responsibilities and excited to welcome Jeff Stouppe as e-learning coordinator,” Whitford said. “These changes are part of our continuing effort to utilize the latest in educational strategies and communication technologies to support Indiana’s critical agricultural industry and help safeguard our crops, fields, wildlife and waterways.”Whitford will continue to write Extension publications and manage outreach activities.As curriculum development specialist, Janssen will be responsible for planning programs and delivering training for initial certification of private and commercial applicators. She will also manage a statewide program to assist farmers in meeting their education requirements for pesticide and fertilizer certification renewal.Myers will be responsible for overseeing more than 32 workshops, conferences and special events each year serving more than 2,000 participants seeking pesticide certification. She also manages PPP’s presence on the web and social media and assists with the Private Applicator Recertification Program (PARP), which serves more than 12,000 Indiana producers.Stouppe begins his new position July 24. He brings more than 15 years of experience as an instructional systems designer to the Purdue Pesticide Programs, where he will be responsible for developing and implementing distance learning strategies such as webinars for PPP courses, workshops, publications and manuals.The Purdue Pesticide Programs, administered by Purdue Extension, are responsible for implementation of pesticide education outreach programs directed at pesticide user groups and the general public, coordination of pesticide research and pesticide impact assessment projects between Agricultural Experiment Station researchers and Purdue Extension specialists, and transmitting regulatory information from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Office of Indiana State Chemist to the regulated community and other interested parties.For more information about PPP, visit the website at https://ag.purdue.edu/btny/extension/pages/ppp.aspx. Facebook Twitter SHARE Facebook Twitter Purdue Pesticide Programs Reorganized SHARE By Gary Truitt – Jul 25, 2017 last_img read more

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The Xenia Effect in Corn

first_img Facebook Twitter SHARE By Hoosier Ag Today – Oct 27, 2017 SHARE Matt Hutcheson, CCA Product Manager Seed Consultants, Inc. The Xenia Effect refers to the effect of foreign pollen on kernel characteristics. Cross-pollination occurs in corn because it is a monecious, which means that it has both male (the tassel) and female (the ear) flowers on a single plant. The Xenia effect occurs when pollen from the tassel of one corn variety moves from one field to another, landing on the silks of another variety which fertilizes and produces. The picture above is an example of the Xenia effect, found by SC agronomists this fall. Flint (also known as “Indian” corn) was planted a short distance from a field of hybrid dent corn. Both the flint corn and dent corn were flowering at the same time, allowing the flint corn to pollinate some kernels on the dent ears. The cross-pollination exhibited by the Xenia Effect can influence testing procedures and production of specialty corn crops. The Xenia Effect in Corn Home News Feed The Xenia Effect in Corn Previous articleHarvest Forecast: 4 Days of Dry Weather Followed by Harvest InterruptionNext article 2017-18 National FFA Officer Team Elected at 90th National FFA Convention & Expo Hoosier Ag Today Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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USDA Seeks Another Experimental ASF Vaccine License, Years from Implementation

first_img SHARE By NAFB News Service – Apr 23, 2019 USDA Seeks Another Experimental ASF Vaccine License, Years from Implementation SHARE The Department of Agriculture intends to grant an experimental license for an African swine fever vaccine. The intent was published in the Federal Register this week that USDA’s Agricultural Research Service intends to grant the license to a company in Bulgaria that manufactures and markets human and animal health products. Currently, there is no commercially available vaccine to protect swine from the deadline virus. Despite the work by the company in Bulgaria and others, National Pork Producers Council Veterinarian Liz Wagstrom told Reuters in February that researchers at USDA believe a vaccine is “a decade away.”Researchers in the European Union believe development of a vaccine may take 20 years. The threat of the disease spreading to the U.S. prompted the cancellation of the World Pork Expo this summer. Since its discovery in China in August 2018, Rabobank estimates that African swine fever has affected 150 million to 200 million pigs, which is nearly 30 percent larger than annual U.S. pork production and equivalent to Europe’s annual pork supply, according to the National Pork Board.Meanwhile, many farms in China infected with African swine fever are not restocking with pigs. Bloomberg News reports that 80 percent of farms infected with the deadly virus are not restocking, leaving a significant gap in production. China is the world’s largest pork producer, but agriculture officials in China say production has dropped 21 percent since African swine fever was first reported last August. And, a new outbreak on an island province was reported over the weekend.The declining hog production in China will result in lower demand for soybeans and feed products, but an increase in the need for pork products. Officials in China say, “if confidence among breeders fails to recover, it will hurt consumers.” They predict pork supplies could start to tighten and prices may hit record levels in the second half of the year, before tightening further in 2020. Pork accounts for more than 60 percent of meat consumption in China. Previous articleCalifornia Fruit Flavoring Company Establishing Operations in Johnson CountyNext articleThe HAT Soil Health Podcast- Soil Erosion Significant Problem Around Indiana NAFB News Service Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News USDA Seeks Another Experimental ASF Vaccine License, Years from Implementation Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Will the Indiana Corn Crop Mature Before the First Hard Frost…

first_img Will the Indiana Corn Crop Mature Before the First Hard Frost on the HAT Thursday Morning Edition SHARE By Eric Pfeiffer – Aug 15, 2019 Home News Feed Will the Indiana Corn Crop Mature Before the First Hard Frost on… Facebook Twitter SHARE Facebook Twitter Audio Playerhttps://dts.podtrac.com/redirect.mp3/www.hoosieragtoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/HATMORN081519.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Podcast (wirepodcastshat-rss): Play in new window | Download | EmbedSubscribe: RSS Previous articleIndiana Farmer Leaders Experience August Crop Report in DCNext articleISDA Photo Contest Winners Honored Eric Pfeifferlast_img read more

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NCGA: EPA Undercuts Corn Farmers, Ethanol Again

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News NCGA: EPA Undercuts Corn Farmers, Ethanol Again Facebook Twitter National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) President John Linder today made the following statement after the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) granted oil refineries two Small Refinery Exemptions (SREs), or waivers, for 2019 Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) blending and one SRE for 2018.“It shouldn’t be a surprise to those who have been paying attention for the last four years that this EPA would undermine corn farmers and the ethanol market on its way out the door. There is no reason for the EPA to take this action now, especially with the Supreme Court set to consider the Tenth Circuit ruling in the new term. Corn farmers need an EPA that will follow the law as written and intended by Congress. NCGA looks forward to working with the Biden Administration to rectify the harm caused by this EPA’s abuse of small refinery exemptions and restore the integrity of the Renewable Fuel Standard.”Today’s waivers roughly account for 260 million ethanol equivalent gallons. NCGA last week, along with bipartisan lawmakers in both the House and Senate, urged the Trump Administration against taking this action.“Farm families and biofuel workers across the country have worked tirelessly to make a living over the past few months despite a global pandemic,” said Growth Energy CEO Emily Skor. “And yet, the Trump Administration’s SRE abuse has piled on to the uncertainty and difficulty that rural Americans are facing every day. Given President-elect Biden’s commitments on the campaign trail, we‘re confident his incoming team will swiftly work to reverse the damage these oil handouts have done to rural America by this midnight maneuvering.”EPA’s action brings the total of SREs granted by the Trump Administration to 88, totaling 4.3 billion gallons of biofuel blending demand destroyed.Sources: National Corn Growers Association and Growth Energy SHARE Facebook Twitter Previous articleAg Groups Welcome Biden Picks for Agriculture Deputy SecretaryNext articlePurdue Fish Fry Goes Virtual to Bring People Together on the HAT Wednesday Podcast Hoosier Ag Today NCGA: EPA Undercuts Corn Farmers, Ethanol Again SHARE By Hoosier Ag Today – Jan 19, 2021 last_img read more

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Things for single people to do on Valentine’s Day

first_imgReddIt Twitter Beth Griffith is a senior journalism major from Cleburne, Texas. She will commission as a 2LT Military Intelligence officer in the United States Army in May. In her free time, she is authoring a clean eating cook book and enjoys volunteering and boxing. IMAGE: Good Karma Fort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturday Beth Griffithhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/beth-griffith/ Facebook Twitter Comin’ Up: saying goodbye to the gang life 6. Do something classic … like a haunted house. Courtesy of giphy.comFew things scream “Valentine’s Day” like actual screams. Grab a group of friends and check out Cutting Edge Haunted House. It’s everything a single person could ask for on the day of love: terror, laughs, cries. It’ll be a great non-traditional way to spend your evening. Beth Griffithhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/beth-griffith/ Facebook + posts TAGSFun timesfunnygifs on gifsSingleValentine’s Day Beth Griffithhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/beth-griffith/ printNothing makes being single seem painful quite like Valentine’s day. But, being alone on Valentine’s day doesn’t have to be awful. In fact, here’s some things you can do to make the day great.1. Treat yo’  self Spend the day doing what your nonexistent lover would do for you. Go to one of the many spas around town like Perfect Touch Day Spa or Mokara Spa at the Omni and treat yourself to a massage or a facial. Enjoy a day celebrating you, because you deserve it. Previous articleDevelopment plan revealed for Berry/University, some express oppositionNext articleDiverse group of students celebrates at TCU lunar festival Beth Griffith RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR 7. Be a tourist in your own city via GIPHYThink about it. The water gardens, the Stock Yards, going to ride a mechanical bull somewhere. All those stereotypical Texan things that you really want pictures doing but have never had the chance, here is your chance. Grab a group of friends, go out and do all those things you thought you would do when you moved to Texas but never actually did. Cowboy boots are encouraged but not required.8. Take care of your household chores Valentine’s Day falls on a Sunday this year, a day that is often reserved for catching up on all that laundry you didn’t do or all the dishes sitting in your sink. So you can do exactly that. Then when Monday morning rolls around you’ll have your full wardrobe at your disposal and a clean kitchen to brag about. Plus it may even make your life seem much more put together than it really is.via GIPHY9. Do absolutely nothing differentWhen it comes down to it, Valentine’s day is just like every other day. Treat it as such. Tomorrow will be just an ordinary Monday. You do you. 2. Have a partyCourtesy of giphy.comEverybody loves a good ol’ anti-Valentine’s Day party. Invite all your single friends over, stock up on the snacks and drinks and enjoy a night of pure unattached bliss at home. 3. Have a girl’s or guy’s night outGrab your crew, get dressed up in your favorite outfit and hit the club. It’ll be full of single people, so if you’re feeling sappy and lonely, the odds are in your favor. Check out Varsity Tavern on 7th Street or catch a good jazz show at Scat Jazz Lounge downtown. Linkedin Ripple Effect: TCU professor talks gravitational waves Severe thunderstorms moving through Fort Worth 4. Get out of townTake all that money you’re saving by not buying someone a cheesy gift and date night and go on a trip. Take a couple of friends and take a cheap flight to Vegas (the single’s homeland) or drive down to Austin for the weekend. Have yourself a weekend to remember. Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Linkedin ReddIt Beth Griffithhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/beth-griffith/ Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store 5. Go to the moviesIf you have or haven’t seen it by Valentine’s day, go watch Deadpool. It’s the perfect flick to make you forget all about this day of love. Beth Griffith last_img read more

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Outstanding FWISD high school artists work on display

first_imgFort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturday Fort Worth ISD Superintendent Dr. Kent Scribner talked to families about education Saturday Simeon Joneshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/simeon-jones/ Middle school French teacher nominated for District Teacher of the Year Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store Simeon Jones ReddIt + posts Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Previous articleFor TCU students, pathway largely paved for landing internships, jobsNext articleTCU drops rubber match 3-1 to Texas Tech; Frogs lose 2nd straight Big 12 series Simeon Jones RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR ReddIt Facebook Twitter Linkedin Simeon Joneshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/simeon-jones/ Linkedin Twitter Facebook printThere were more than 4,000 submissions to the Annual Fort Worth ISD Secondary Schools Art Awards Night for High School Tuesday night.Students and parents explored the art exhibit in Billingsley Field House, taking pictures of the artwork on display and the prizes individuals won for their artwork.“Exceptional student artwork is selected for this exhibition and it is an honor which demonstrates special artistic talent,” Fort Worth ISD Director of Art EducationBeverly Fletcher said.Catherine Vest, a senior at Arlington Heights High School, took home the big prize as she won first place for her art portfolio. Vest won a $2,000 scholarship to go towards her college tuition as well as a trophy and ribbons.To win the top prize, a student must have had developed his or her artwork over four years and submitted his or her 12 best works of art in at least three mediums or more. The students also had to show improvement from freshman to senior year in order to show the judges their growth.Fletcher said over 100 submissions were sent for the art portfolio award and the judges chose the top 10. Four won trophies and two won scholarship money from their art portfolio.Vest said that for her, winning first place meant that people liked her art and that her hard work had paid off.“I was surprised because I don’t really think what will come out of it,” Vest said. “I just think about the piece and hope to see the end of it.”Vest said that when she initially found out she had won first place for her portfolio, she cried and needed to sit down to catch her breath.For every great artist there is a great inspiration that drives them. For Catherine, that inspiration comes from the Northwest Pacific.“My main inspiration for most of my pieces is the Northwest Pacific because of all the big trees and greenery,” Vest said.As for life after the awards show, Vest said that she plans to keep working on art.“I’m actually planning to go to college for it and probably get a master’s degree,” Vest said of her future plans.Beverly Fletcher has been apart of this art show for 25 years now and says one main reason she loves doing the art show is to honor and give awards to students who work really hard on their artwork all year long.“I feel that this art show is a very important part of art students’ life and can even be apart of their whole future in art,” Fletcher said.Over 500 awards were passed out to students from the Fort Worth area in different categories and divisions. This art show has been going on for more than 70 years awarding graduating high school students with scholarship money to help fund their college tuition and pursue their career in art.Fletcher talked about Sedrick Huckaby, a native of Fort Worth who won 1st place in the art portfolio division when he was a senior in high school.  Huckaby has since became a popular artist with his work going to be featured at the National Gallery in Washington D.C.Fletcher used this example to show how students can be impacted by this event and the famous artists that have come from this art show.“I have seen students that have been very positively affected by this event that started 70 plus years ago,” Fletcher said. “Through the Fort Worth ISD we can help students achieve greatness, achieve their dreams and follow their vision of success.”last_img read more

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Frogs soccer finish opening weekend with consecutive shutouts

first_imgWhat to watch during quarantine Facebook Frogs complete a strong opening weekend with early scoring and strong defense. I am the executive editor of TCU 360 from Raleigh, North Carolina. If you walk by my desk in the newsroom you’ll immediately know I’m Post Malone’s biggest fan. I’m always looking for a good story to tell! If you have any story ideas, feel free to reach out! Go Panthers! TCU wants ex-professor’s discrimination suit dismissed Previous articleHoroscope: August 21, 2017Next articleSolar eclipse livestream Robbie Vaglio RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter The College of Science and Engineering Dean, Phil Hartman, retires after 40 consecutive years ReddIt Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ Snow temporarily stepping down as honors dean Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ + posts Robbie Vaglio Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ Facebook Two students joined harassment and discrimination lawsuit against TCU TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history ReddIt printTCU soccer capped opening weekend with a second consecutive shutout victory, defeating the UTSA Roadrunners by a five goal margin.The Frogs’ second game of the season played out very similarly to the first. The Horned Frogs dominated possession for the second straight game and played strong defense. Over the weekend, TCU combined for 10 goals while only allowing four shots from the opposition.The first shot allowed by the Frogs came in the 23rd minute of today’s game.“They’re just going out and applying the information they’ve been given,” head coach Eric Bell said. “Over the couple of games we’ve played this season, we’ve continually gotten better, and that’s what it’s all about. Every time we step on the field, we’re giving ourselves a chance to get better.”The Horned Frogs came out strong in the first half, again, capitalizing twice in the early stages of the match.In the sixth minute, sophomore midfielder Tara Smith received a strong cross from senior defender Ryan Williams into the box and shot into the left corner of the goal. The goal marked Smith’s first career goal as a Horned Frog.Just two minutes later, the Frogs earned a corner kick. Senior forward Allison Ganter crossed the ball to the opposite end of the box where junior midfielder Karitas Tomasdottir jumped up to head the ball in over the keeper’s outstretched arms.In the 24th minute, senior forward Emma Heckendorn completed another cross from Williams between the legs of the keeper to give the Frogs a three goal lead. The goal marked Heckendorn’s first goal of the season.The final two goals of the match were scored by junior forward McKenzie Oliver. In the 32nd minute, Williams wove through the defense to lay the ball between two Roadrunner defenders into Oliver’s path who immediately pulled the shot into the bottom right corner of the net. In the 45th minute, freshman forward Tayla Christensen found Oliver on a breakaway. Oliver drew the defender left and shot the ball, just barely getting the ball over the goalkeeper’s arms and into the UTSA net.“I haven’t tallied too many goals over the past two seasons, so to start off the first weekend with two goals feels pretty great,” Oliver said.The match marked the second game played on the new field, and Oliver has noticed the major difference the new turf makes on the team’s overall play.“I love it,” Oliver said. “The elevation’s nice and it’s all flat. It’s a lot easier to play both ways.”Bell agreed that the new field is helping the team’s level of play.“The quality of the surface is great,” Bell said. “It’s a lot softer so there’s not as much wear and tear on your body, and when that’s combined with the kind of lighting we had on Friday night, it makes it into a venue where the quality of soccer can be really good.”The Frogs will look to continue the strong play on both ends of the field when they travel to Colorado next weekend. The Frogs will face the University of Colorado and Northern Colorado next Friday and Sunday night. World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Linkedin Twitter Linkedinlast_img read more

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