COVID-19 protocols: Recipe for disaster in Pennsylvania prisons

first_imgBryant Arroyo (left) with Joe Piette of WWP Prisoners Solidarity Committee.Incarcerated workers across Pennsylvania are demanding that Department of Corrections Secretary John Wetzel reverse his disastrous decision to begin mass transfers of prisoners at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic. The following commentary is from an interview by Joe Piette with jailhouse organizer and environmentalist Bryant Arroyo, confined at State Correctional Institution Frackville, falsely convicted of a crime.The DOC policy contradicts Wetzel’s supposed responsibility of care, custody and control. People are feeling anxiety. We can’t tell what it’s gonna be from one day to the next because of these unpredictable decisions that are detrimental to our very lives.It exacerbates mental health. It has staff in the middle. They can’t say anything because they’re employed here. But the top officials making these decisions place them in harm’s way, as well as us.Concerned staff tell us that their boss, Wetzel, “would rather have a dangerous plan in place than no plan.” Wetzel has not only backpedaled on policies that seemed to be working to protect people, he is now putting staff and inmates in a more vulnerable position. But he’s not here. He’s in an office. [Staff] are on the ground. The fish rots from the head down.These are not emergency transfers. There are Plan B sites that can be used in the event of natural disaster, but these are not being utilized. Instead, prisoners are being transferred from COVID-19 hotspots into other facilities.What if one of them gets it from an inmate transferred from a particular hotspot, and that officer takes it home? Then what do you have? You’re creating one outbreak on top of another, instead of coming up with a true solution and protecting us at all costs.Subsequent to this policy change, SCI Pine Grove announced it will be transferring all of its adult prisoners and converting to an exclusively youth detention facility. The DOC intends to do this mass transfer at the height of the new spike in cases.Meals are usually delivered during lockdowns, but now prisoners are made to wait in line and bring meals back to their cells. The meals are cold by the time they receive them. Meals for those in the Behavioral Modification Units and other restricted housing units are delivered in “hot carts” to keep them warm. But there aren’t enough for general population. It’s not even winter, and the meals are already stone cold by the time prisoners receive them.Isolation anxietyWe need sunshine, exercise and, most importantly, social interaction. We are locked into our cells 23 hours a day. The mass mental health crisis that’s exploding in prisons, after [people are] being confined like this for over eight months, is isolation anxiety. It creates panic, rage, loss of control and complete mental breakdown. We need at least two hours [out of our cells]. Straight. No intervals. Or three hours, one period during the day and one at night.The tension of solitary confinement is causing fights to break out during the few hours imprisoned workers aren’t locked in. Like a chemical reaction, the end result of isolation anxiety is you react and combust. It’s like we’re starved dogs getting let out of a cage. All you want to do is eat, nourish yourself and feel normal. And Secretary Wetzel has put the entire Pennsylvania DOC in direct defiance of the protocols set out by the Centers for Disease Control.There are a hundred people on the block. Each tier is about 50 people. They are unlocked on a staggered schedule, one tier at a time on one-hour intervals, which creates a situation that deprives us of our full time. Even when people can congregate on the block, are they able to practice safe social distancing? Not at all. You can’t stay six feet apart.Prisoners are taking extraordinary measures to stay safe. We’re taking our showers. We’re provided with extra cleaning utensils to keep the hygiene to the highest standard. And that’s proven by the track record of what we’ve been doing for the last seven to eight months, which has been working. But all that is changing as Wetzel’s pandemic transfers makes it impossible for prisoners to protect themselves from the virus.Making matters worse, incarcerated workers like John Ludovici have raised the alarm on a systematic violation of their rights as mental health patients. He says his two staff psychologists work in the same office as his unit manager. The presence of someone who is not a patient’s health care provider — let alone someone who is their jailer — during sessions is a flagrant violation of privacy rights enshrined in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Ludovici has filed a complaint to the board of licensure that certified his staff psychologists. He also filed an administrative grievance against his unit manager, despite being pressured by her not to do so.Protocol noncomplianceThere are both male and female staff who are sincerely and genuinely concerned about not only contracting [COVID-19], but taking it home to their family members. Wetzel is opening up the floodgates into a facility where we have had basically zero cases.There are 256 inmates [who] fill up the dormitories, which are open without cell doors. Ninety-eight men who were transferred to Camp Hill during recent renovations in this housing unit are now being brought back to Frackville. Staff are wearing MP95 masks. Guards are being given mandatory overtime because of staff shortages, as there are those allegedly quarantining for 14 days. I don’t know if they even retest [the guards] after that.An additional 28 or so inmates just came in from [SCI] Dallas. One of them tested positive for the antibodies; in other words, he’s been exposed to COVID-19. Then they re-tested him, and he came back negative. So we’re dealing with that, too.Protocol noncompliance is the major thread that goes through everything I’m explaining to you and revealing to you while I’m here. Presently and again, Secretary Wetzel is the person behind it. It’s a recipe for disaster.This is part of an ongoing series of articles based on conversations of Workers World reporters with Bryant Arroyo. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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NCGA: EPA Undercuts Corn Farmers, Ethanol Again

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News NCGA: EPA Undercuts Corn Farmers, Ethanol Again Facebook Twitter National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) President John Linder today made the following statement after the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) granted oil refineries two Small Refinery Exemptions (SREs), or waivers, for 2019 Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) blending and one SRE for 2018.“It shouldn’t be a surprise to those who have been paying attention for the last four years that this EPA would undermine corn farmers and the ethanol market on its way out the door. There is no reason for the EPA to take this action now, especially with the Supreme Court set to consider the Tenth Circuit ruling in the new term. Corn farmers need an EPA that will follow the law as written and intended by Congress. NCGA looks forward to working with the Biden Administration to rectify the harm caused by this EPA’s abuse of small refinery exemptions and restore the integrity of the Renewable Fuel Standard.”Today’s waivers roughly account for 260 million ethanol equivalent gallons. NCGA last week, along with bipartisan lawmakers in both the House and Senate, urged the Trump Administration against taking this action.“Farm families and biofuel workers across the country have worked tirelessly to make a living over the past few months despite a global pandemic,” said Growth Energy CEO Emily Skor. “And yet, the Trump Administration’s SRE abuse has piled on to the uncertainty and difficulty that rural Americans are facing every day. Given President-elect Biden’s commitments on the campaign trail, we‘re confident his incoming team will swiftly work to reverse the damage these oil handouts have done to rural America by this midnight maneuvering.”EPA’s action brings the total of SREs granted by the Trump Administration to 88, totaling 4.3 billion gallons of biofuel blending demand destroyed.Sources: National Corn Growers Association and Growth Energy SHARE Facebook Twitter Previous articleAg Groups Welcome Biden Picks for Agriculture Deputy SecretaryNext articlePurdue Fish Fry Goes Virtual to Bring People Together on the HAT Wednesday Podcast Hoosier Ag Today NCGA: EPA Undercuts Corn Farmers, Ethanol Again SHARE By Hoosier Ag Today – Jan 19, 2021 last_img read more

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Outstanding FWISD high school artists work on display

first_imgFort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturday Fort Worth ISD Superintendent Dr. Kent Scribner talked to families about education Saturday Simeon Joneshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/simeon-jones/ Middle school French teacher nominated for District Teacher of the Year Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store Simeon Jones ReddIt + posts Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Previous articleFor TCU students, pathway largely paved for landing internships, jobsNext articleTCU drops rubber match 3-1 to Texas Tech; Frogs lose 2nd straight Big 12 series Simeon Jones RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR ReddIt Facebook Twitter Linkedin Simeon Joneshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/simeon-jones/ Linkedin Twitter Facebook printThere were more than 4,000 submissions to the Annual Fort Worth ISD Secondary Schools Art Awards Night for High School Tuesday night.Students and parents explored the art exhibit in Billingsley Field House, taking pictures of the artwork on display and the prizes individuals won for their artwork.“Exceptional student artwork is selected for this exhibition and it is an honor which demonstrates special artistic talent,” Fort Worth ISD Director of Art EducationBeverly Fletcher said.Catherine Vest, a senior at Arlington Heights High School, took home the big prize as she won first place for her art portfolio. Vest won a $2,000 scholarship to go towards her college tuition as well as a trophy and ribbons.To win the top prize, a student must have had developed his or her artwork over four years and submitted his or her 12 best works of art in at least three mediums or more. The students also had to show improvement from freshman to senior year in order to show the judges their growth.Fletcher said over 100 submissions were sent for the art portfolio award and the judges chose the top 10. Four won trophies and two won scholarship money from their art portfolio.Vest said that for her, winning first place meant that people liked her art and that her hard work had paid off.“I was surprised because I don’t really think what will come out of it,” Vest said. “I just think about the piece and hope to see the end of it.”Vest said that when she initially found out she had won first place for her portfolio, she cried and needed to sit down to catch her breath.For every great artist there is a great inspiration that drives them. For Catherine, that inspiration comes from the Northwest Pacific.“My main inspiration for most of my pieces is the Northwest Pacific because of all the big trees and greenery,” Vest said.As for life after the awards show, Vest said that she plans to keep working on art.“I’m actually planning to go to college for it and probably get a master’s degree,” Vest said of her future plans.Beverly Fletcher has been apart of this art show for 25 years now and says one main reason she loves doing the art show is to honor and give awards to students who work really hard on their artwork all year long.“I feel that this art show is a very important part of art students’ life and can even be apart of their whole future in art,” Fletcher said.Over 500 awards were passed out to students from the Fort Worth area in different categories and divisions. This art show has been going on for more than 70 years awarding graduating high school students with scholarship money to help fund their college tuition and pursue their career in art.Fletcher talked about Sedrick Huckaby, a native of Fort Worth who won 1st place in the art portfolio division when he was a senior in high school.  Huckaby has since became a popular artist with his work going to be featured at the National Gallery in Washington D.C.Fletcher used this example to show how students can be impacted by this event and the famous artists that have come from this art show.“I have seen students that have been very positively affected by this event that started 70 plus years ago,” Fletcher said. “Through the Fort Worth ISD we can help students achieve greatness, achieve their dreams and follow their vision of success.”last_img read more

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Mr. and Ms. TCU winners reflect on the meaning behind the crown

first_imgFacebook Facebook printHorned Frogs will see a different kind of halftime show this week as the annual crowning of Mr. and Ms. TCU joins the festivities. TCU has honored two graduating seniors with this title since 1944. In recent years, honorees, who are chosen by their peers, have been recognized for efforts that have changed TCU and Fort Worth for the better.“We have focused more on student involvement in the community, which has really been a great way to see how these students are engaging with the TCU mission statement,” Brad Thompson, the assistant director of student activities said. “There are extraordinary students at TCU, and it is always so encouraging to me to meet them and for them to be recognized by their peers.”TCU student organizations nominated candidates last spring. Finalists were then chosen based on essays, resumes and a student body vote. Ten men and women will continue in this year’s selection process by participating in faculty and staff interviews, according to TCU’s Student Affairs website. Brandon Victorian, an electrical engineering major, is a Mr. TCU nominee. Victorian, who is involved in various programs at TCU, said he thinks he’s qualified for the award because of his campus involvement.“I’ve given so many different people a chance to get to know who I am, and that allows my more social side to show,” Victorian said. “I think winning it would be a huge honor, mostly because the winner is selected to embody what it means to be a TCU student.Michael Drake, a finance and entrepreneurial management double-major, is another nominee. Drake said winning would serve as a great way to see how he has impacted TCU .“It would mean so much,” Drake said. “I still think it is crazy that it is senior year. This school has provided opportunities to grow personally, professionally and I have been blessed with some of the best friends ever.” The 1979 recipient of Mr. TCU, which was named homecoming king, Michael Mckee, said he was elated and humbled when he won.“Being chosen as Homecoming King prompted an even deeper affection and appreciation for my alma mater,” Mckee said. “It was an enormous honor.”The rigor of the selection process didn’t deter the excitement for the 2009 recipient of Mr. TCU, Jimmy Hopper. “The process helped me to build relationships with administrators and professors at TCU,” Hopper said. “I loved my time there, and this was a pleasant surprise.”Elise Smith, Ms. TCU 2009, said winning meant a lot to her as a student and an alumna.“TCU does a wonderful job of acknowledging students that are passionate about this institution – it  further solidified that I was a valued member of the community,” Smith said.The 2007 winner of Mr. TCU, Cameron Sparks, said he was surprised by the student-driven selection process. “I was super grateful and humbled by the whole experience,” Sparks said. The fact that it is voted on by the student body made it that much more special.”Many past recipients said winning this award validates their hard work while they were at TCU.“I loved my time at TCU, and being named Mr. TCU was simply an extension of that love,” Brian Casebolt, the 2002 recipients of Mr. TCU, said. “My life was changed for the better by working alongside the many talented students, faculty, staff and alumni to make our local and global community.”“ Grace Amisshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/grace-amiss/ Twitter Linkedin Previous articleFamiliarity adds another layer to nationally televised showdownNext articleThe Skiff: October 19, 2017 Grace Amiss RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Grace Amiss Revamped enrollment process confuses some students Twitter Ms. TCU 1995 winner, Gina Rector. Grace Amisshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/grace-amiss/ Language barriers remain in TCU’s alert system Grace Amisshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/grace-amiss/ TCU cancels offer to trade tickets for canned food ReddIt + posts TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history ReddIt Flu activity remains high in Texas World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Grace Amiss is a senior journalism major and managing editor for TCU360. When she is not reporting she is most likely raving about her golden retriever or taking a spin class. Grace is currently writing about student life at TCU, so feel free to drop her a line if you come across a story you feel is worth sharing! Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Linkedin Grace Amisshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/grace-amiss/last_img read more

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Fourth journalist released

first_img RSF_en Cuba and its Decree Law 370: annihilating freedom of expression on the Internet News CubaAmericas Receive email alerts Jorge Olivera Castillo has become the fourth independent journalists to be freed in the past eight days, following Oscar Espinosa Chepe, Raúl Rivero and Edel José García Díaz. Reporters Without Borders welcomes his release and hopes that the other 22 journalists still held in Cuba will also soon be freed. December 6, 2004 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Fourth journalist released Organisation October 12, 2018 Find out more News CubaAmericas RSF and Fundamedios welcome US asylum ruling in favor of Cuban journalist Serafin Moran Santiago Reporters Without Borders welcomed the release today for health reasons of Jorge Olivera Castillo – the fourth independent journalist to be freed in the past eight days – and voiced the hope that the Cuban authorities will free the other 22 journalists still detained in Cuba.Of the 75 dissidents detained in a crackdown in March 2003, seven in all have so far been freed since 29 November. The three other journalists to have been released are Oscar Espinosa Chepe, Raúl Rivero and Edel José García Díaz.In a statement on 30 November, Reporters Without Borders called on the Cuban government to show a real commitment to democratisation by “putting an end to the state monopoly of news and information.” The organisation also called on the European Union to maintains its close relations with Cuba’s dissidents and to continue to condition its relations with the Cuban government on an “improvement in the situation of human rights and political freedoms” and respect for democratic pluralism.Olivera has serious gastric problems and eye trouble caused by glaucoma and high blood pressure. Human rights activist Elizardo Sánchez of the independent Cuban Commission for Human Rights and National Reconciliation (CCDHRN) told Agence France-Presse that, of all the imprisoned detainees, Olivera was among those who were in worst shape.Sánchez added: “There may be one or two more releases in the hours or days to come, but there won’t be any massive release of prisoners of conscience.”Aged 41 and director of the Havana Press independent agency, Olivera was arrested at his Havana home on 18 March 2003 and was given a summary trial along with three other journalists two weeks later. He was sentenced to 18 years in prison for writing articles for the nuevaprensa.org website and the Spanish magazine Encuentro that were considered under law 88 to be “against national independence and Cuba’s economy.”A former employee of the Cuban Institute of Radio and Television (ICRT), Olivera was a TV news editor for 10 years. He tried to leave Cuba on a raft in 1992, but was caught and detained for three days. He then joined the ranks of the dissidents and set up Havana Press with two other journalists in 1995.More information about Olivera’s arrest, trial and prison conditions New press freedom predators elected to UN Human Rights Council to go further News May 6, 2020 Find out more Follow the news on Cuba October 15, 2020 Find out more News Help by sharing this information last_img read more

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Doherty says undocumented Irish in Australia are being failed by government

first_img Doherty says undocumented Irish in Australia are being failed by government RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Nine Til Noon Show – Listen back to Wednesday’s Programme Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH GAA decision not sitting well with Donegal – Mick McGrath Pinterest WhatsApp A Donegal Deputy says successive Irish governments have failed the diaspora.Deputy Pearse Doherty says having raised the issue of undocumented citizens living abroad, the responses he has received from Minister Charlie Flanagan have been totally inadequate, particularly in terms of the funding allocated to support them.He says no progress has been made in terms of the undocumented in the US, and now the number of Irish citizens being deported from Australia after overstaying their temporary visas is growing.This is an issue Deputy Doherty says he will be raising in the Dail this week…………Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/pearseoz.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. By admin – January 13, 2016 center_img Pinterest Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson Homepage BannerNews Twitter NPHET ‘positive’ on easing restrictions – Donnelly Facebook Google+ Google+ Previous articleDonegal Chair of the Dail’s Petitions Committee reacts to calls for Conor McGregor to feature on coinsNext articleSurvey finds most Donegal businesses intend taking on staff in 2016 admin Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector publishedlast_img read more

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Suspended Functioning Of Delhi HC, Subordinate Courts Extended Till June 14

first_imgNews UpdatesSuspended Functioning Of Delhi HC, Subordinate Courts Extended Till June 14 LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK29 May 2020 3:37 AMShare This – x The functioning of the Delhi High Court and its subordinate courts will remain suspended till June 14. A decision to this effect was taken by the Administrative and General Supervision Committee of High Court on Friday, taking note of the COVID-19 situation. Earlier, the Committee had suspended the functioning till 31st May. All pending matters listed before the High Court from June…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?Login The functioning of the Delhi High Court and its subordinate courts will remain suspended till June 14. A decision to this effect was taken by the Administrative and General Supervision Committee of High Court on Friday, taking note of the COVID-19 situation. Earlier, the Committee had suspended the functioning till 31st May. All pending matters listed before the High Court from June 1 to June 12 stand adjourned to dates in July and August. The notification mentions the slots of dates allotted for the adjourned matters. Also, the matters listed before the subordinate courts from June 1 to June 12 have been adjourned en bloc. Further information in this regard would be uploaded on District Court website.Click here to download the notificationNext Storylast_img read more

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Casey’s PR agency apologise for re-tweeting controversial Late Late Show video

first_img By News Highland – November 14, 2018 WhatsApp News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme WhatsApp Homepage BannerNews Pinterest Google+ The PR agency behind Peter Casey’s Presidential bid has apologised for re-tweeting a video which satirised the businessman’s Late Late show appearance and his views on the traveling community.Bannerton PR has since deleted the tweet, and “apologised wholeheartedly” to anyone who may have been offended by the clip.The company says it doesn’t support the content of the video in any way, and shouldn’t be linked to any of its employees.Bannerton PR has also said it is no longer managing Mr. Casey’s public relations and cannot comment on his behalf. Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Twitter Previous articleCalls for Jobpath programme to be scrappedNext articleThree vehicles caught speeding in Letterkenny News Highland DL Debate – 24/05/21 Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Pinterest Casey’s PR agency apologise for re-tweeting controversial Late Late Show video Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

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Pennsylvania church opens doors as ‘safe place to share’ grief after five relatives slain in alleged murder spree

first_imgcmannphoto/iStock(MORRISVILLE, Pa.) — Students, community members as well as the local police chief came together at a Pennsylvania church to mourn five slain family members — including three children — whose bodies were found dead in their Morrisville apartment on Monday.Wednesday night’s community prayer vigil at the Morrisville United Methodist Church was an “opportunity for the community to all come together and share their grief together and say ‘we are one,’” Pastor Wendy Bellis told ABC News Thursday. “Nobody is by themselves.”The victims were Jamilla Campbell, 42; Campbell’s 9-year-old twin daughters, Imani and Erika Allen; Campbell’s niece, Naa’Irah Smith, 25; and Campbell’s nephew Damon Decree Jr., 13.The accused killers are Campbell’s sister, Shana Decree, 45, and Shana Decree’s daughter, Dominique Decree, 19, the Bucks County District Attorney’s Office said. Shana Decree is the mother of Damon Decree Jr. and Naa’Irah Smith.Students were among those at Wednesday’s service. “It’s difficult to see our kids in so much pain and having to work through things they shouldn’t have to work through at their age,” Bellis said.But the students were “completely enveloped by the community, loved and supported,” and given “a very safe place to share their grief,” she said.Morrisville’s police chief, who has been “very supportive,” was also at the service, Bellis said. When a pastor acknowledged he was there, the congregation applauded, she said.“That’s how we’re going to move forward,” Bellis said. “Being in solidarity together is what every community needs and certainly what we need during this time.”As mourners hugged and cried, each victim’s name was read followed by a moment of silence, according to the Bucks County Courier Times.Jason Harris, superintendent of the district where victim Damion Decree Jr. went to school, said the 13-year-old “made me smile.”“I knew him personally. He had a close group of friends — they’re really hurting,” Harris told ABC News on Wednesday.The district is bringing in counselors and therapy dogs to help grieving students and staff, he said.Shana Decree and Dominique Decree each face five counts of criminal homicide and one count of conspiracy to commit criminal homicide, prosecutors said.A motive is unclear, Bucks County District Attorney Matthew Weintraub told reporters Tuesday.Shana Decree and Dominique Decree were both arraigned Tuesday and held without bail, prosecutors said.It was not immediately clear if either suspect had an attorney.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Assistant Professor of History Full-Time Tenure Track

first_imgRequired Qualifications DescriptionInterested in a career at Columbia Basin College? Join ourteam! From our distinguished faculty to our dedicated staff,CBC is committed to our vision to be the educational home thattransforms students’ lives through economic and social mobility. Weseek to attract and retain engaged and dynamic individuals who arecommitted to helping all students be successful in accomplishingtheir goals and who will contribute to an exciting workenvironment. We value high quality instruction and student learningexperiences that foster diversity, equity and inclusion in theclassroom and expand into our local and global communities. Wecelebrate diversity in all its forms and believe that our manyunique perspectives make us stronger.Sound like something you’d like to be a part of? CBC iscurrently seeking an outstanding and enthusiastic individual toteach a broad range of courses in World Civilizations and UnitedStates history, and also contribute to departmental and divisionalofferings based on their areas of specialization. The individualchosen needs to be flexible with broad interests and willingness toteach in a variety of areas and with a variety of methods,including online.This position will report to the Dean for Social Science &Education.CBC Faculty and Staff respect and work effectively with diversestudents, colleagues, staff and others in a campus climate thatpromotes innovative teaching, quality scholarship, a diverselearning environment, and equitable access and educationalachievement for all students.GENERAL QUALITIES DESIRED:Passion for teaching and a commitment to student success;Commitment to the community college mission;Commitment to shared governance and staying current in one’sdiscipline;Willingness to become involved in campus activities beyondone’s discipline;Willingness to teach with a variety of methods, includingeLearning and instructional innovations;Ability to teach individuals from diverse backgroundseffectively;Ability to pursue scholarly endeavors in area of expertise;andAbility and willingness to participate in the design andmeasurement of learning outcomes and institutional effectivenessefforts.The base salary for this position is $61,157 for a 176-day contractover the Instructional Year (Fall/Winter/Spring Quarters).Additional compensation may be available for assignment of summerquarter courses or courses taught outside of the full-time positionduring fall, winter and spring quarters.Relocation expenses are considered for the employment offer for thesuccessful candidate if the candidate relocates to the Tri-Citiesarea from outside of a 175-mile radius.This position is open until filled. Priority consideration willbe given to applicants whose application has been received byJanuary 17, 2021 at 11:59 PM PDT.Primary Responsibilities Develop, prepare, and teach a broad range of college-approvedcourses in accordance with approved course descriptions and classschedules (includes the use of multimedia technology in theclassroom);Develop syllabi and reading lists for each course taught andupdate annually; participate in departmental/divisionalresponsibilities in the selection of texts and related teachingresources;Maintain a minimum of five (5) regularly scheduled office hourseach week at times that provide reasonable opportunities forstudents to meet with faculty;Maintain, submit, and retain accurate academic records,including verification of class rosters and student grades, bydates requested by the College and to comply with state and federalrecords retention laws;Orient students at the beginning of each class to syllabi andaddenda, subject to subsequent modification and notice tostudents;Assess student learning outcomes, engage in timelyinteraction/feedback/grading to support student success and meetcourse outcomes;Provide students with appropriate learning resources tofacilitate student success in achieving course outcomes, programoutcomes, and appropriate College-wide Student LearningOutcomes;Demonstrate multicultural competence including an awareness andunderstanding of historically disadvantaged populations, andcreating an educational environment that affirms commitment todiversity, equity and inclusion;Engage in shared governance by participating in department,division and College committees and assisting in the formulation ofpolicy pertaining to educational programs;Participate in commencement ceremonies, wearing academic robes,unless excused by the President;Develop and attend professional improvement activities in orderto maintain contact with one’s academic discipline, includingteaching/learning processes and/or development of knowledge inone’s field of specialization;Participate in outreach activities to promote educationalprograms;Participate in special College projects, surveys, andstudies;Assist in the preparation of reports as needed by College units(e.g., Student Services, Grants Office, Athletic Department,Institutional Effectiveness) and by the College in general (e.g.,for accreditations, program review and so forth);Develop new instructional materials, techniques, courseofferings or major revisions of the same;Participate in community service activities consistent with theCollege’s mission;Participate in student career development in related advisingor mentoring activities and special retention programs; andAttend College-mandated trainings, professional developmentactivities and/or meetings.center_img Master’s degree in History or related field from aninstitutionally accredited college or university ;Two (2) years of college-level teaching experience; andExperience with computer applications for instructionalpurposes (e.g. PowerPoint, Word and the internet).PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:Ph.D. in History or related field from an institutionallyaccredited college or university ;Experience with eLearning techniques, such as web-supportedface-to-face courses, hybrid courses or other distance learningapplications.GENERAL INTERVIEW INFORMATION:Only completed applications submitted on or before the priorityconsideration date are guaranteed to be reviewed for this position.The interview process generally consists of an in-person or Zoom(video conference) initial interview, with top candidates selectedfor an on-campus interview. Those top candidates traveling from adistance of 200 miles or more will be provided travel expenses suchas flight, per diem, etc. Those candidates traveling less than 200miles, but more than 75 miles, will receive mileage at the IRSrate. Mileage calculations are determined by distance between thecity in which the candidate lives and Pasco, WA using MapQuest. TheCollege reserves the right to make changes to the process for anemergency hire or under exceptional circumstances as determined bythe College.TERMS OF EMPLOYMENT:This position is available September 1, 2021 to coincide with theregular tenure track probationary cycle for the 2021-2022Instructional Year. Tenure review is a system in which the facultymember is evaluated as a candidate for tenure under the College’stenure review process and Chapter 28B.50 RCW. Schedule varies;assignment may include evening and weekend classes.PROCESS NOTE:Prior to a new hire, a background check including criminal recordhistory will be conducted. Information from the background checkwill not necessarily preclude employment but will be considered indetermining the applicant’s suitability and competence to performin the position.CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT:In the interest of providing a healthy, safe and secure educationaland work environment, and in order to meet the requirements offederal legislation, it is the policy of the College to maintain analcohol and drug-free workplace for our employees andstudents.If you are hired, you will need to provide proof of identity anddocumentation of U.S. citizenship or appropriate authorization towork in this position as required by the Immigration Reform ControlAct of 1986.Columbia Basin College operates under an approved affirmativeaction plan and encourages applications from persons of color,women, veterans and persons of disability. The Human ResourcesOffice is accessible to those with disabilities. If you needaccommodation in application or employment, contact the HumanResources Office at (509) 542-4740.OTHER JOB ELEMENTS:The physical demands and working conditions described below arerepresentative of those that must be met and may be encountered byan incumbent when performing the essential functions of theposition. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enableindividuals with qualified disabilities to perform the essentialfunctions.PHYSICAL DEMANDS OF POSITIONWhile performing the duties of this position, the employee isfrequently required to sit, stand, bend, kneel, stoop, communicate,reach, and manipulate objects. The position requires mobility,including the use of step stools in order to retrieve archivedmaterials. Duties may involve moving materials weighing up to 25pounds on a regular basis such as papers, files, boxes, equipment,computers, etc., and rarely requires moving materials weighing over25 pounds. Manual dexterity and coordination are required over 50%of the work period while operating equipment such as computerkeyboard, monitor, projector, calculator, printer, and standardoffice equipment.WORKING CONDITIONSWork environment includes classroom, lab, or other setting asappropriate.UNION CLAUSE:This is a bargaining unit position represented by the Associationfor Higher Education (AHE).last_img read more

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