Linear Air to serve three Vermont airports

first_imgLinear Air Now Providing Vermont Business and Leisure Travelers an Alternative to Commercial Air TravelOn Demand Air Travel Company Servicing Vermont Regional AirportsConcord, Mass., September 15, 2008 – The cutback of airline routes and increased fares are fueling travelers search for viable options to traditional travel offerings. Linear Air, a provider of point-to-point air service from the mid-Atlantic region through eastern Canada, makes the travel experience easier and more enjoyable for those traveling to and from Vermont by leaving from and arriving at regional airports.This fall, there will be an estimated 20 million fewer seats on U.S. domestic flights, according to the Official Airline Guide. While the cutbacks are global, the U.S. appears to be bearing the brunt of the downturn, with a 7% decline in September and continued declines in both October and November. In the U.S., 32 airports will lose scheduled air service altogether. Riding on the wave of change in the commercial airline industry, Linear Air is actively promoting its services to Burlington International Airport, Edward F. Knapp State Airport (Barre/Montpelier) and Rutland Regional Airport.”Travelers around the country are rethinking how to get from point A to point B in an efficient way that allows them to maximize their business or vacation schedules,” said Linear Air CEO Bill Herp. “Linear Air recognizes the tremendous opportunity to serve Vermont travelers and ultimately save them frustration and missed business or vacation time resulting from inconvenient travel schedules. We fly where they need to, when they need to, right from a nearby airport.Linear Air serves 10 times more airports than the traditional commercial airlines serve and can provide direct and on-demand service for customers, saving the time, headache and expense of commercial airports. Trips are tailored to meet the needs of business and leisure travelers. Arrival and departure times are based on the customer’s schedule, eliminating time spent waiting in airports and preventing additional hotel costs for overnight stays. Flights are pay-as-you-go and all inclusive, with no baggage or fuel surcharges.About Linear AirBased in Concord, Massachusetts, Linear Air provides point-to-point air taxi service with unprecedented service to more than 750 cities in the Northeast, mid-Atlantic and eastern Canada. The Linear Air fleet includes three-passenger Eclipse E500 business jets and eight-passenger Cessna Grand Caravan turboprops. Linear Air is a FAA-certified part 135 charter operator that maintains a Gold safety rating from ARG/US, the leading independent safety auditor in the aviation industry. For more information, visit www.linearair.com(link is external) or call 1-877-2-LINEAR.last_img read more

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Douglas budget contains additional $850,000 for marketing Vermont as tourist destination

first_imgOfficials in the tourism and hospitality industry said they were pleased that the alternative budget approach proposed by Governor Jim Douglas contains an additional $850,000 to market the state. With the summer tourism season unofficially kicking off over Memorial Day Weekend, Tourism and Marketing Commissioner Bruce Hyde said the money couldn t come at a better time. Tourism is one of the largest industries in our state, and spending on promoting Vermont is an investment in job creation and retention, Hyde said. Our recent economic impact study showed that visitor spending in Vermont supported approximately 37,000 jobs for Vermonters.He noted that there were roughly 60,000 jobs in the hospitality and entertainment sector in Vermont, spread out in literally every county of the state, and visitor spending contributed $206.9 million in tax and fee revenues to state coffers in the General, Education and Transportation Funds. A strong tourism economy is vital to Vermont, and marketing the state as a travel destination benefits us all, said Ed Stahl, executive director of the Stowe Area Association. Lamoille County is very dependant on tourism for total revenue, so we re very encouraged that the Governor is appropriating a total of $1.35 million to promote Vermont. This is an investment that we will see a return on many times over.Kelly Pawlak, general manager of Mount Snow Resort, agreed. The Mount Snow Valley relies heavily on tourism, and the news about additional funding to market Vermont is music to our ears, she said.  Vermont has such a strong brand, so this decision will show a quick return on investment.  Visitors are looking for affordable and drive-to vacations right now, and Vermont really fits the bill. These additional funds will help showcase all we have to offer.  Hyde said that while officials were optimistic about the upcoming summer tourism season, the state would be competing for scarce visitor spending with other states boasting far larger marketing budgets, and that the department planned to make some funding available for local chambers of commerce, with the state and chambers splitting the cost as a 50-50 match. Using the federal stimulus money to boost our tourism sector is just good economic development, Hyde said. The Legislature s plan to spend $500,000 is a good start, but the Governor s proposal of $1.35 million is a significant increase that will really have an impact on bringing visitors and their money to Vermont.Visitors to the Green Mountain State spent more than $1.61 billion for goods and services in 2007, according to a recent study prepared by Economic and Policy Resources (EPR) of Williston that measures the impact of visitor spending on the Vermont economy.The complete report is available online on the Vermont Department of Tourism and Marketing s industry Web site at www.VermontPartners.org(link is external). www.vermontvacation.com(link is external).Source: Governor’s Officelast_img read more

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VHB Pioneer transitions to VHB

first_imgVHB,Effective September 15, having successfully completed its integration into Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc. (VHB), the firm’s Vermont office will no longer be marketing itself as ‘VHB Pioneer.’The merger of the two firms that took place in January 2008 was built on an existing relationship between VHB and ‘Pioneer Environmental Associates LLC’ of Vermont. For nearly three years, VHB has benefited from the excellent reputation of the Pioneer name in Vermont as the office continued to integrate transportation and land development services with environmental consulting expertise, strengthening the firm’s regional prominence in Vermont and Northern New England. The North Ferrisburgh office now has a staff of over 30 professionals, and offers a full suite of services to better serve clients in the region.‘The past few years have proved to be very successful for VHB in Vermont and the Northern New England region. The merger of the two firms has provided new opportunities, resources, and enthusiasm, which demonstrate the benefits of joining forces,’ explained Vermont office manager, Jeff Nelson. ‘We are excited to fully transition to VHB and continue to build on these successes in the future.’The North Ferrisburgh, Vt. office is the firm’s second northern New England office. The firm also has an office in Bedford, New Hampshire. Together the Northern New England team comprises nearly 100 employees.About Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc.Watertown, Massachusetts-based Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc. is an 850-person firm that provides integrated transportation, land development and environmental services from 19 offices along the east coast. Engineering News-Record ranks VHB 82nd of the Top 500 U.S. Design Firms and among the Top 50 Transportation Firms in the Nation. CE News magazine consistently ranks VHB among the Best Civil Engineering Firms to Work For in the U.S. For more information, visit www.vhb.com(link is external). Source: VHB. North Ferrisburgh, Vt., (September 21, 2010) ‘last_img read more

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MVP Health Care receives ‘Gold’ Award for workplace wellness

first_imgMVP Health Care,MVP Health Care, a leading not-for-profit health care plan, today announced that it has been honored by the Vermont Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports for its worksite wellness program.  MVP received the award from Governor Peter Shumlin at the Worksite Wellness Conference, presented by the Vermont Department of Health, held earlier today in Burlington for its promotion of good health practices on and off the job. Receiving the award on behalf of MVP was President and CEO Dave Oliker.‘At MVP, our employees and their families are the heart of our business,’ Oliker said. ‘As a result, our company culture focuses on our employee wellness programs, which engage our employees and their families to live healthy lifestyles, decrease the risk of disease, and enhance the quality of life, all of which contribute to the company’s continued success.’MVP was recognized for its outstanding tools and support it offers employees and their families including premium discounts for healthy BMI data, Wellstyle Rewards, a points-based incentive program for employees who are improving their personal health status, a 10-week Choose to Lose weight loss challenge and access to health coaches, online tools, classes and programs.‘We are committed to offering our employees and their families the same kinds of wellness programs to get and stay healthy that we embed in many of the health insurance products we offer in the Vermont communities that we live, work and serve,’ said William Little, Vice President at MVP Health Care in Vermont.This is the first time MVP Health Care has been recognized by the Vermont Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports Worksite Wellness Committee and was chosen from a group of 79 entrants.About MVP Health CareFounded in 1983, MVP Health Care is a regional, not-for-profit health insurer based in Schenectady, N.Y. Through its operating subsidiaries, it provides fully insured and self-funded employer health benefits plans, dental insurance, and ancillary products, such as flexible-spending accounts, to more than 700,000 subscribers in New York State, Vermont and New Hampshire. For more information, visit: www.mvphealthcare.com(link is external).last_img read more

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North Country Hospital raises $160,000 to fight cancer

first_imgNorth Country Hospital,As an oncologist at the Oncology and Hematology Clinic at North Country Hospital in Newport, Les Lockridge MD knows all too well the impact cancer has on patients, their families, and the community. So when about 600 people took part in this year’s Relay for Life in Newport on June 25 and 26 his heart was warmed by the region’s dedication to battling cancer.The event, which included 60 teams, raised almost $160,000, beating out last year’s $143,000.Les Lockridge M.D. and Evelyn Page, a cancer survivor, were two of the several hundred people who attended this year’s relay for life.‘Anytime you have the community rally to fight cancer that is a good thing,’ Dr Lockridge said. ‘A portion of the money goes toward cancer research and remainder goes towards helping patients cover expenses not covered by health insurance.‘At Relay we celebrate the lives of survivors, remember loved ones lost, and fight back so that one day no one hears the words, “You have Cancer”. The Fight Back Ceremony itself is designed to keep people thinking about the ways they can fight back the other 364 days a year,’ explained Dr. Lockridge. ‘Wearing sunscreen, hats, sunglasses, and getting pre-screening treatments like mammograms, colonoscopies, and pap tests are all ways we can be pro-active in our fight against cancer.’For a number of years North Country Hospital’s Oncology and Hematology Clinic has sponsored the Fight Back Ceremony at the relay. This is appropriate since the clinic has been helping patients fight cancer for over 20 years.While nobody wants to get the news they have cancer, Dr. Lockridge said a growing number of people are surviving it.”The future is undeniably bright for cancer care,’ he said.  ‘We’ve made so much progress in the way of non-chemo/non-toxic therapeutics and supportive care (anti-nausea drugs, blood growth factors, etc.) that the face of oncology has changed dramatically from even ten years ago. Treatment is much gentler, our understanding of side effects is greater now, and oncology is still the fastest developing field in medicine. As far as outcomes, cancer is more curable and much more manageable.  Myeloma, for instance, is now more like diabetes in terms of being something you live with rather than die from.’last_img read more

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Less than 1,200 CVPS customers remain without power

first_imgSeptember 2, 2011 ‘ 8:30 am. The lights came on for many in the last isolated areas last night, but CVPS crews will not rest until every outage is restored.As of 8:30 am, more than 71,000 of the 73,000-plus customer outages have been restored. Outages remain in Windsor, Windham and Orange counties.As we restore power to the last customers, we want to ensure that we are not missing any customers at this point. If your still do not have power, please call CVPS at 1-800-451-2877, and confirm your outage.  However, many customers throughout the state have flood damage to their homes. If a customer’s home or business was flooded, and their electric service panel was affected by water, it has to be examined by a qualified electrician before CVPS can restore service.  CVPS is waiving all fees for temporary service connections required due to the storm.  The fee is normally $80.The lights came on for many customers in Rochester, Pittsfield, Stockbridge, Hancock and Braintree Thursday. A portable substation was delivered to Rochester and was energized, as work continues on the Rochester Substation, restoring power to much of the town.Power was restored to many customers in east Dover and Wardsboro last night. West Jamaica Road, Pikes Falls Road and Water Street in Jamaica are still inaccessible, isolating about 120 customers that our crews cannot reach at this time. We will continue our assessment of that area today to see if there is some way to reach them. Crews hope to restore power to much of South Newfane by tonight.‘While we’re pleased to be able to return power and some sense of normalcy to these customers as swiftly as we have, given the condition of the roads, we know we are not done,’ said President Larry Reilly. ‘There are still dozens of poles to set, many lines to rebuild, many lines to reroute, some for just a few customers at a time. But we’re not stopping until we restore service to every last customer we can.’Line and field workers were greeted to cheers and applause by customers throughout central and southern Vermont this week as they entered communities isolated since Sunday. But crews feel little satisfaction until they can turn on customers’ power.‘We know each and every customer wants their power back, and our crews aren’t truly happy until they’ve restored a customer’s power,’ said Joe Kraus, senior vice president of engineering, operations and customer service. ‘It is disheartening to put up lines and poles, only to know you aren’t restoring power to some customers because their houses are so damaged by flooding that they can’t safely receive electrical service. There are going to be many who need electrical inspections due to flooding, but when they are ready, we’ll be there to restore power.’Some customers in the most remote areas remain inaccessible due to road washouts, but road crews are improving access for utility vehicles daily.  Collaboration with local and state Agency of Transportation officials, and the National Guard, continues.In some cases it is not a question of when the road will be re-opened, but rather when will the new temporary road be built.CVPS urged Vermonters to use extra caution around waterways, many of which are still flowing at very high levels, and new rainfall can cause and has caused flash flooding.Up-to-date outage numbers (by town) can be found at: http://www.cvps.com/CustomerService/outages/(link is external) and http://vtoutages.com/(link is external)last_img read more

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Vermont requests individual assistance declaration for Lamoille, Franklin and Orleans counties

first_imgGovernor Peter Shumlin announced today that the state has requested an Individual Disaster Declaration for three additional counties in Vermont: Franklin, Lamoille and Orleans. If approved, residents and business owners in those counties will be eligible to apply for federal assistance for everything from repair work to temporary rent payments resulting from damage created by Tropical Storm Irene. ‘Our recent assessment of these counties found that damage to homes and businesses meets the threshold for federal assistance,’ Gov. Shumlin said. ‘We hope FEMA will move quickly to approve this declaration request so we can begin getting help to home and business owners in these counties.’ The counties of Addison, Bennington, Caledonia, Chittenden, Orange, Rutland, Washington, Windham and Windsor had already been approved for individual assistance by the White House. Assessment of damage to homes and businesses in Franklin, Lamoille and Orleans Counties was completed on Sept. 13. Every county except Grand Isle has received a Public Assistance Declaration, which provides federal assistance for repair and replacement of roads, bridges and other public infrastructure. The IA declaration will allow home and business owners who sustained damage from the Tropical Storm to apply for reimbursement for repairs, temporary housing costs, septic system replacements, entrance and exit ways from the home, including privately owned access roads, and more.last_img read more

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Tritium identified in water sample from Connecticut River near Vermont Yankee

first_imgNorthstar Vermont Yankee,The Vermont Department of Health Laboratory analysis of a water sample from the Connecticut River has again detected tritium. This sample was taken from the river on November 3 and had a tritium concentration of 1,120 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). No other radionuclides were detected. The VDH announced the finding today.The Connecticut River samples were pumped from a hose below the surface of the water next to the shoreline where the plume of tritium-contaminated groundwater is moving into the river. River water samples obtained on July 18, July 25, and August 8, 2011 from the same location were also positive for tritium. Tritium concentrations in those samples were 534 pCi/L, 611 pCi/L, and 565 pCi/L respectively. To date, no other radionuclides that could have originated from Vermont Yankee have been detected in river water.The Health Department immediately sent the water sample to its contract laboratory to be analyzed for hard-to-detect radioactive materials including strontium-90. Confirmatory gamma spectroscopy and analysis for tritium will also be done.The Health Department contacted Vermont Yankee to find out if their split of the river water sample had been analyzed. Vermont Yankee informed the Health Department on Tuesday, December 20 that its sample was also positive for tritium at a concentration of 1,230 pCi/L.There is no risk to public health. These low concentrations of tritium at the river’s edge are immediately diluted by the greater volume of river water to the point that they cannot be measured.To date, no tritium has been found at the six other locations in the river that are routinely sampled. No radioactive materials that could have originated from Vermont Yankee have been found in active drinking water wells on or off the plant property. One exception is the COB well, a drinking water well located at Vermont Yankee that had not been used since February 2010, which tested positive for tritium in October 2010. The Departments of Health and Public Safety and the Agency of Natural Resources have requested that the COB well be routinely tested. Vermont Yankee has not agreed to do this.This Connecticut River water sample is one of many samples obtained by the Health Department in its ongoing surveillance of the environment for impacts of the radioactive system leaks identified in early 2010. The sample is also part of a broader environmental surveillance program that uses hundreds of air, water, vegetation, milk, soil, river sediment and other samples to determine if Vermont Yankee releases contribute to increases in the public’s exposure to radiation.The sample results confirm the Conceptual Site Model that indicates small amounts of tritium would eventually reach the river. Bi-weekly sampling of the river will continue in accordance with the Vermont Yankee sampling plan. Follow-up samples taken on November 7 and 10 showed no signs of tritium. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the departments of health in Vermont, New Hampshire and Massachusetts have been notified of the information by Vermont Yankee.  Source: Vermont Dept of Health. Entergy Vermont Yankee 12.21.2011last_img read more

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U.S. Coal Subsidies Are Even Bigger Than You Thought

first_imgU.S. Coal Subsidies Are Even Bigger Than You Thought FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Tom Sanzillo for Energy Desk Greenpeace:Research by IEEFA and Greenpeace is essentially filling a void that should have been covered by proper government oversight.Despite the paucity of publicly available data and the institutional recalcitrance of the BLM, IEEFA and Greenpeace hewed to methodology rooted in fact.We mined audits of the program from the the 1970s and 1980s (a bygone era in which there were 25 formal General Accounting Office reviews, a multi-volume congressional commission report, and a number of useful nonprofit and coal industry reports).We studied BLM practices from the time and investigated whether appropriate updates in program management or relevant policy had occurred.They hadn’t.Comment: US coal subsidies are even bigger than you thoughtlast_img read more

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Natural-Gas Executive Sees Growing Risk in Public Opposition and Regulatory Scrutiny

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Hannah Northey for E&E:The amount of time it takes companies to get a new gas project approved and operational — from the proposal phase to steel in the ground — has grown from three years to four, Donald Santa, CEO of the Interstate Natural Gas Association of America, said during an interview this week.The principal causes for delays are the host of substantive, fact-based questions about pipeline routing and emissions that activists, landowners and other stakeholders are bringing up during the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission review process, Santa said.“I think in some ways it’s become the new reality,” Santa said. “Project applicants today have got to revise their expectations in terms of [when their pipelines will be operational] to anticipate the need to deal with more opposition.”“I think in some ways it’s become the new reality,” Santa said. “Project applicants today have got to revise their expectations in terms of [when their pipelines will be operational] to anticipate the need to deal with more opposition.”Developers face ‘new reality’ of protests, longer reviews Natural-Gas Executive Sees Growing Risk in Public Opposition and Regulatory Scrutinylast_img read more

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