Scholarships

first_imgBy Stephanie SchupskaUniversity of GeorgiaWhen Ron Walcott talked to high school students at a recent Georgia Daze breakfast, he had five new ways to entice them to come to the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences – five, full-ride scholarships for minority students.The scholarships, funded by a U.S. Department of Agriculture multicultural scholars grant, are welcome news as the college and the agricultural industries they support work to recruit more minorities into agriculture-related careers.“There are all these jobs over here through our college, and all these people who need jobs who are not in our college. There’s a big disconnect,” said Walcott, who is the CAES assistant dean for diversity and multiculturalism and an associate professor of plant pathology. “The jobs that are here are very fruitful and rewarding.”CAES graduates are in jobs from Chick-fil-A corporate offices to Capitol Hill. They’ve gone on to work at top-level jobs in horticulture, poultry science, food science and engineering. They now work for various government agencies, in forensic pathology and as environmental advocates.When Walcott is talking to highly qualified minority students through various CAES programs like the Georgia Daze breakfast and the Young Scholars Program, a full ride from other universities is often what pulls them away from UGA. The summer-long Young Scholars Program allows high school students who show a high aptitude in math and science to intern in CAES labs. “We have to have something to offer them,” said Jean Bertrand, CAES assistant dean of academic affairs. “They’re going because of such good scholarships. Receiving these scholarships is the only way we could compete.”CAES has slightly higher minority numbers than other UGA colleges.“CAES is fortunate to have many talented faculty dedicated to diversity,” said Louise Wicker, a CAES professor of food science and technology. In the past year, CAES received two USDA grants – the $150,000 multicultural scholars grant and a $142,000 higher education challenge grant. The HEC grant, directed by Wicker, helps undergraduate minority students gain research and job experience in UGA labs at the Athens, Tifton and Griffin campuses. It also provides funds for faculty, staff and students to improve their mentorship skills in science, technology, engineering and math.Walcott is developing a network of high school teachers who serve underrepresented populations in Georgia’s metro areas. He wants to show them what agricultural careers really entail so they will send students his direction.In the past few years, CAES has seen a slight increase in minority populations. In 2007, CAES had 55 Asian students, or 3.9 percent of the population, up from 33 students in 2003. In 2007, the college had 62 African-American students, or 4.3 percent of the population, up from 35 students in 2003.In fall 2008, CAES had 1,588 undergraduate and 414 graduate students, a record enrollment. “We need a more diverse pool of students to serve the more diverse industry,” Bertrand said. “And we need our industry to become more diverse to serve our even more diverse society.”Walcott said one way to entice students into ag-related majors is to get agriculture on their radars. Most don’t know about agriculture or what they know is wrong. Whether they make it a career or are simply advocate for agriculture, he wants them to think, “Oh, ag. Oh, that’s so cool.”He sees education as the “only real way you can change your class, your chance to earn money and your outlook on life in your lifetime,” he said.Walcott grew up in Barbados. Instead of making basketball a career or becoming a medical doctor, he moved to Iowa State University and went into plant pathology.(Stephanie Schupska is a news editor for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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North Country Hospital raises $160,000 to fight cancer

first_imgNorth Country Hospital,As an oncologist at the Oncology and Hematology Clinic at North Country Hospital in Newport, Les Lockridge MD knows all too well the impact cancer has on patients, their families, and the community. So when about 600 people took part in this year’s Relay for Life in Newport on June 25 and 26 his heart was warmed by the region’s dedication to battling cancer.The event, which included 60 teams, raised almost $160,000, beating out last year’s $143,000.Les Lockridge M.D. and Evelyn Page, a cancer survivor, were two of the several hundred people who attended this year’s relay for life.‘Anytime you have the community rally to fight cancer that is a good thing,’ Dr Lockridge said. ‘A portion of the money goes toward cancer research and remainder goes towards helping patients cover expenses not covered by health insurance.‘At Relay we celebrate the lives of survivors, remember loved ones lost, and fight back so that one day no one hears the words, “You have Cancer”. The Fight Back Ceremony itself is designed to keep people thinking about the ways they can fight back the other 364 days a year,’ explained Dr. Lockridge. ‘Wearing sunscreen, hats, sunglasses, and getting pre-screening treatments like mammograms, colonoscopies, and pap tests are all ways we can be pro-active in our fight against cancer.’For a number of years North Country Hospital’s Oncology and Hematology Clinic has sponsored the Fight Back Ceremony at the relay. This is appropriate since the clinic has been helping patients fight cancer for over 20 years.While nobody wants to get the news they have cancer, Dr. Lockridge said a growing number of people are surviving it.”The future is undeniably bright for cancer care,’ he said.  ‘We’ve made so much progress in the way of non-chemo/non-toxic therapeutics and supportive care (anti-nausea drugs, blood growth factors, etc.) that the face of oncology has changed dramatically from even ten years ago. Treatment is much gentler, our understanding of side effects is greater now, and oncology is still the fastest developing field in medicine. As far as outcomes, cancer is more curable and much more manageable.  Myeloma, for instance, is now more like diabetes in terms of being something you live with rather than die from.’last_img read more

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Financial education for immigrants: Gear up your credit union’s accessibility

first_imgA current hot topic in politics is immigration. For hundreds of years, people have been coming to the United States for hundreds of different reasons. But politics and history aside, people keep moving to the United States, and these people earn and spend money, and have to make financial decisions. For someone in a new place with unfamiliar financial systems, this can be a daunting task. Noticing an ever-growing need for financial education and resources to be available to people from a myriad of socioeconomic, cultural, and language backgrounds, the CFPB conducted a field scan of financial education programs available to immigrant populations. The resulting report makes clear some of the financial challenges that many immigrants face.As this is a clear indicator of the direction the CFPB is heading, it serves as a good reminder to check your credit union’s efforts and preparation to work with and educate immigrant consumers. This is a good idea for everyone, but if your credit union is in an area with a high immigrant population, it is particularly important to look ahead and learn how you can improve member reach and service.Challenges Immigrants FaceMany low- and moderate-income persons find it challenging to build financial well-being. However, the challenges of being an immigrant combined with the challenges of low- to moderate-income socioeconomic status makes the experience even more difficult. The CFPB found that these challenges correlated strongly with knowledge and understanding of the financial system, trust in financial institutions, and experience with financial products.Misunderstandings about fees and minimum balance requirements led many immigrant households to mistrust and express frustration with their credit unions. These feelings suggest that many immigrant consumers feel more comfortable paying a check casher than managing a bank account with minimum balance requirements and fees. Findings also support the belief that check cashers may have more convenient hours and locations and are more likely to have bilingual staff.Because these people are new to the United States, credit reporting companies cannot compile a credit history. That means that many immigrants have a “thin” credit file, or no file at all. For those who were able to get credit, a limited understanding of the features of the products and the information about managing credit and debt further damages their ability to obtain future credit. However, this challenge extends beyond personal credit. According to the Small Business Administration, approximately one in 10 immigrant workers owns a business. Again, lack of credit history and information makes it difficult for these immigrant business owners to borrow beyond personal credit cards and loans.Many immigrants are unaware or uniformed about the documentation requirements for opening an account at a credit union. Many believed opening a bank account required a Social Security number or a driver’s license, when in fact, some credit unions accept foreign passports, consular IDs or other alternative forms of identification.The above challenges become even more difficult for individuals who have limited English proficiency. Financial disclosures and other documents may only be available in English and many credit unions do not have bilingual employees, particularly for languages other than Spanish. When financial education materials and documents are provided in other languages, they are often translated from English to their literal foreign language equivalent which can be difficult to understand or even unintelligible for the reader. Language challenges also can cause immigrant consumers to be more susceptible to scams and deceptive practices.Challenges Financial Educators FaceMany of the challenges faced by immigrants correspond to challenges faced by financial educators. Immigrant populations are difficult for financial educators to reach because immigrants, especially those who lack documentation, may not trust offers of help coming from outside their social networks. In addition, many immigrants work nonstandard hours and it may be difficult for credit unions to offer education programs tailored to nontraditional schedules.Perhaps the biggest challenge faced by financial educators is the language barrier. Finding and producing financial education materials in a variety of languages is difficult, especially for less common languages. Translations are often difficult and require expertise to be effective. Finding, hiring, and retaining bilingual and bicultural staff is also difficult.SolutionsOutreach and Awareness CampaignsUsing awareness campaigns and mass media to give immigrant populations information about U.S. financial institutions and trustworthy sources of financial education for those seeking financial education.For those who would not otherwise seek financial education, some organizations have been effective in using “edutainment” with embedded educational content to reach immigrant communities. Financial Education ProgramsFinancial education can be offered through classes or individualized coaching. These services are often tailored to meet immigrant needs.An essential part of increasing financial awareness for consumers who have limited English proficiency is providing language-accessible materials.Many organizations implement Individual Development Account (IDA) programs or similar matched savings programs that are combined with financial education to help low- and moderate-income individuals save for short- and long-term asset-building purchases. The Assets for Independence (AFI) program is a major funder of IDAs available to the broader U.S. population. 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Jane Pannier Jane Pannier is Senior Vice President and in-house counsel for AffirmX LLC, a developer of an innovative remote compliance review solution. Ms. Pannier is also SVP of AdvisX, a CUSO … Web: www.affirmx.com Details The CFPB’s ResponseFirst, the report specifically mentions that CFPB contact centers can assist consumers in more than 180 languages. The calls they have received in languages other than English and Spanish have “consistently increased month over month.” While your institution may not have the resources for that kind of linguistic coverage, it is still a good idea to be as prepared as possible to meet consumers’ language needs.In addition, the CFPB developed “The Newcomer’s Guides to Managing Money,” which are intended to provide immigrants with basic and straightforward financial information. These guides are available in a variety of languages and focus on the following topics:Ways to receive moneyWays to pay billsChecklist for opening an accountSelecting financial products and servicesEven if no hard regulations come of this report, it’s still prudent for credit unions to be aware of the challenges immigrants face when trying to learn how to navigate our financial system and to provide assistance and resources that will serve immigrant consumers in your area. Regulation or not, improved member outreach and service is always something to strive for. Targeted Financial Products and ServicesCredit union services and other small and credit-building loans can be tailored to cater to the needs and experiences of immigrants.Many immigrants like to bank in person, and the customer service experience matters to them. Thus, making customer service and locations accessible to immigrants is beneficial.Making mortgages available to ITIN holders allows many immigrants without other identification documents to secure mortgage loans.Citizenship loan availability makes citizenship available to immigrants who may otherwise not be able to afford the application cost.last_img read more

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Nottingham offices

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Unai Emery wants to offload Arsenal duo Mesut Ozil and Henrikh Mkhitaryan in summer transfers

first_img Comment Ozil is Arsenal’s top earner (Picture: Getty)Unai Emery is eager to offload Mesut Ozil and Henrikh Mkhitaryan this summer along with three other Arsenal stars, reports say.The Arsenal boss is finalising his summer transfer plans and believes several of his first-team regulars are not good enough.Ozil has faced criticism this season for his lack of consistency, while his fellow German Shkodran Mustafi is also up for sale.The Sun claim Arsenal is searching for buyers for five of their players this summer, with Ozil, Mkhitaryan, Mustafi, Mohamed Elneny and Carl Jenkinson all facing the axe.ADVERTISEMENT Coral BarryWednesday 8 May 2019 4:56 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link1.5kShares Emery is ready to offload Mustafi (Picture: Getty)Arsenal play their final game of the Premier League season this Sunday away at Burnley, but can still qualify for the Champions League through the Europa League.An away trip at Valencia stands between Arsenal and a spot in the Europa League final and the chance to snatch a spot in next season’s Champions League as winners.MORE: Francis Coquelin takes subtle dig at Arsenal ahead of Europa League semi final against Valencia Mkhitaryan is also facing the axe (Picture: Getty)Ozil and Mkhitaryan are on big wages at the Emirates and Emery wants to free up money to spend on new additions.AdvertisementAdvertisementMkhitaryan reportedly earns £180,000-a-week, while Ozil is the club’s highest earner with a contract worth around £350,000-a-week.Centre-back Mustafi has been the subject of intense criticism from Arsenal fans this season, having made several high profile mistakes in defence. Unai Emery wants to offload Arsenal duo Mesut Ozil and Henrikh Mkhitaryan in summer transfers Emery wants to free up money from the wage bill (Picture: Getty)Without Champions League football, there will be little money available to Emery this summer and the head coach will look to raise transfer funds from sales.Mustafi has struggled to settle in at Arsenal since his move from La Liga three years ago and Arsenal are in desperate need of a reliable centre-back.Midfielder Elneny and right-back Jenkinson have been on the fringes of the first-team this season and Emery is prepared to offload the pair. Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

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Teens who use concentrated marijuana more likely to use other drugs

first_imgNBC News 26 August 2019Family First Comment: “Marijuana concentrate can come in multiple forms, including oils and butter-like compounds, and can contain very high levels of THC, the psychoactive compound in cannabis. It’s often ingested using a vaping device and doesn’t smell like traditional pot. In the study, published Monday in the journal Pediatrics, researchers surveyed almost 50,000 adolescents in Arizona. The researchers found that among teens who used any form of cannabis, 72% had experience with the more potent products.”Teens who used a concentrated form of marijuana — sometimes called dabs, wax, shatter or crumble — are more likely to also use other drugs than kids who avoid marijuana, a new study suggests.Marijuana concentrate can come in multiple forms, including oils and butter-like compounds, and can contain very high levels of THC, the psychoactive compound in cannabis. It’s often ingested using a vaping device and doesn’t smell like traditional pot.In the study, published Monday in the journal Pediatrics, researchers surveyed almost 50,000 adolescents in Arizona. The researchers found that among teens who used any form of cannabis, 72 percent had experience with the more potent products.Those findings should serve as an alert to parents who may not even know their kids are vaping, said the study’s lead author, Madeline Meier, an assistant professor of psychology at Arizona State University.“I don’t know that parents know about this stuff,” Meier said. “If I weren’t a marijuana researcher, I don’t know if I saw [a vape with marijuana] that I would know what it was. Parents should educate themselves about what these forms of cannabis look like.”To get a better sense of teen drug use, Meier and her colleagues surveyed 47,142 students in eighth, 10th and 12th grades from 245 schools across Arizona in 2018. The students were asked whether they’d ever used marijuana or marijuana concentrate, as well as whether they had used either in the past month. They were also asked about other drug use, peer substance use and whether they thought cannabis was safe.READ MORE: https://www.nbcnews.com/health/kids-health/teens-who-use-concentrated-marijuana-more-likely-use-other-drugs-n1045961Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

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Mohamed Salah shows kind heart to football fan

first_imgMohamed Salah has once again gone the extra mile to put a smile on a fan’s face with the gift of a signed boot to a young supporter injured in a bomb attack. Eight-year-old Hamis al Gacir lost a leg as the result of bombing for the Assad Regime Forces in Idlib, Syria. Fitted with a prosthetic leg, the youngster escaped to the nearby Turkish province of Hatay. This week, Hamis received a thoughtful gift from Liverpool winger Salah in a heartfelt show of support during such a difficult time. The Egyptian ace sent over a signed boot attached to a framed poster featuring illustrations of the footballer. Crampons also came with the boot to help the youngster attach it to his prosthetic leg and kick a ball with his hero’s boot. Hamis gaves a thumbs-up while posing for photos with the gift while donning full Liverpool kit. This is not the first time Salah has lent a helping hand to those in need. The 27-year-old has donated significant funds to build a hospital and school in his hometown of Nagrig. In March of 2018, he handed over £500,000 for medical equipment to treat child cancer at Cairo’s 57357 Hospital. Read Also:Tokyo 2020 participation: Liverpool awaiting more information before making decision on Salah More recently, Salah’s wife Magi gave birth to their second daughter – nine months after the 4-0 demolition of Barcelona – to join first daughter Makka. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted ContentBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic Bombs6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually TrueWorld’s Most Delicious Foods10 Inventions That Prove Humanity Is Failing BadlyThe Models Of Paintings Whom The Artists Were Madly In Love WithTop 10 Most Populated Cities In The WorldThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read More5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksPlaying Games For Hours Can Do This To Your BodyThe Highest Paid Football Players In The World10 Phones That Can Easily Fit In The Smallest Pocket Loading… last_img read more

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P180-K ‘shabu’ seized

first_imgBACOLOD City –Eleven sachets of suspected shabu valued at around P180,000 were seized in abuy-bust operation in Barangay 2. Residents JamilRecaido, 22, and Ronell Dumali, 39, yielded the suspected illegal drugs, policesaid. They weredetained in the lockup cell of Police Station 2, facing charges for violationof Republic Act 9165, or the Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002./PNcenter_img Recaido andDumali were caught after they allegedly sold a sachet of shabu to an undercoverofficer for P500 on Nov. 6, the police added. last_img read more

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Poland holds ‘tight’ presidential poll runoff

first_imgA woman casts her vote during presidential runoff election in Krakow, Poland, Sunday, July 12, 2020. AP PHOTO/PETR DAVID JOSE WARSAW – Voting started Sunday in Poland’s razor-blade-close presidential election runoff between the conservative incumbent, President Andrzej Duda, and liberal, pro-European Union Warsaw Mayor Rafal Trzaskowski. Duda is backed by the ruling right-wing party and the government, as he seeks a second 5-year term. Trzaskowski, a former European Parliament lawmaker, runs for the main opposition Civic Platform party that was in power in from 2007 to 2015. Both candidates are 48.center_img Latest polls showed that the race may be decided by a very small margin. Amid calls from both sides to some 30 million eligible voters to cast ballots, turnout is expected to be higher than the 64.51% in the first round on June 28. (AP)last_img read more

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Saturday Local Sports Results

first_imgTennisThe Batesville varsity and junior varsity tennis teams to remain undefeated and improve their records to 7-0 on the season.The varsity won their match 4-1 while the JV won 7-0.Batesville vs. Madison Tennis (9-7)Submitted by Batesville Coach Mike McKinney.Girls SoccerBatesville defeats Centerville and Oldenburg Academy to win Batesville Invitational.Batesville Girls Soccer InvitationalBatesville vs. Centerville (9-7)Oldenburg Academy vs. Rising Sun (9-7)Oldenburg Academy at Batesville (9-6)Submitted by Batesville Coach Kyle with Var Vee.South Ripley and Greensburg battle to a 1-1 tie.South Ripley at Greensburg (9-7)South Ripley vs. Greensburg (9-7)Submitted by SR Statistician Patsy Cumberworth with Var Vee.last_img read more

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