Champlain College unveils an Information Security degree program

first_imgBURLINGTON, Vt.–Champlain College is offering a new Information Security degree that will put students on the front line of the information technology battlefield. Students will learn to fend off information loss and computer intrusions–including threats from nefarious hackers, debilitating viruses, stealthy Trojan Horses and denial-of-service attacks.Starting in the fall, the program joins Champlains Computer Networking and Computer & Digital Forensics programs to create a unique and comprehensive team of undergraduate offerings in this dynamic IT arena. Information Security professionals keep undesireables out of their networks, said program director Gary Kessler, when describing the difference between the programs. Computer forensics professionals investigate the problem once someone has gotten in.A bachelors degree and a seven-course professional certificate will be introduced in the fall. These will also be available online in the coming academic year so working professionals can attend class via the Internet. Some of the new courses include Software Security, Web Security, Securing the Enterprise Network, Business of Information Security and the Information Security Senior Project.New lab tools will allow for infowar exercises; teams of students will build servers and try to protect them from another team that is trying to attack the server.Champlains InfoSec program takes an innovative approach by first allowing students to earn an associates degree in Computer Networking before earning their bachelors degree in Information Security. Were going to make sure people are knowledgeable about administering networks and then well teach them how to secure them, said Kessler, a nationally recognized security expert. It will make our students far more aware of what they are securing.Our graduates will be able to switch hit between network administration and information security–and we believe that will make them desirable in the workforce, Kessler said.The need for educated information security professionals is borne out by hard data. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, IT positions are expected to be among the fastest growing occupations through 2012. Early career paths upon graduation include information security manager, network security administrator, firewall administrator and information privacy officer.What we are seeing is more information technology in the business place: cheaper prices leading to more computer equipment, more computers leading to an increased requirement to build networks, and more networks leading to increase vulnerability and exposure of information and information systems, Kessler said.Jobs are found in both the private and public sectorsincluding positions related to homeland security. All of our countrys critical infrastructures have technology vulnerability, Kessler said. The need for trained professionals is spelled out in The National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace, published by the White House in February 2003. This document lists five information security priorities, and the third priority is training programs. In addition, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants named information security as the top technology affecting the accounting profession, noting that it is an integral part of how America does business today.Jobs in this field are all but guaranteed to not be shipped overseas due to several factors, Kessler said, including the need to get assistance on the premises quickly, in addition to very real national security concerns.Chris Pache, a Champlain College student from Rindge, N.H., with a penchant for networking, will transfer into the new program. I like learning about detection and prevention, he said. I used to try to see how my files got infected and how I could have avoided it.Pache is used to having dormmates come to him with computer problems and he thinks his skills will serve him well in the future. I think quality network administrators with security knowledge are in high demand, he said.More information on the new program is found by visiting http://www.champlain.edu(link is external) or by calling Champlain College at 800/570-5858. Founded in 1878, Champlain College is a private, career-oriented college with 1,700 full-time and 850 part-time students.# # #last_img read more

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Financial education for immigrants: Gear up your credit union’s accessibility

first_imgA current hot topic in politics is immigration. For hundreds of years, people have been coming to the United States for hundreds of different reasons. But politics and history aside, people keep moving to the United States, and these people earn and spend money, and have to make financial decisions. For someone in a new place with unfamiliar financial systems, this can be a daunting task. Noticing an ever-growing need for financial education and resources to be available to people from a myriad of socioeconomic, cultural, and language backgrounds, the CFPB conducted a field scan of financial education programs available to immigrant populations. The resulting report makes clear some of the financial challenges that many immigrants face.As this is a clear indicator of the direction the CFPB is heading, it serves as a good reminder to check your credit union’s efforts and preparation to work with and educate immigrant consumers. This is a good idea for everyone, but if your credit union is in an area with a high immigrant population, it is particularly important to look ahead and learn how you can improve member reach and service.Challenges Immigrants FaceMany low- and moderate-income persons find it challenging to build financial well-being. However, the challenges of being an immigrant combined with the challenges of low- to moderate-income socioeconomic status makes the experience even more difficult. The CFPB found that these challenges correlated strongly with knowledge and understanding of the financial system, trust in financial institutions, and experience with financial products.Misunderstandings about fees and minimum balance requirements led many immigrant households to mistrust and express frustration with their credit unions. These feelings suggest that many immigrant consumers feel more comfortable paying a check casher than managing a bank account with minimum balance requirements and fees. Findings also support the belief that check cashers may have more convenient hours and locations and are more likely to have bilingual staff.Because these people are new to the United States, credit reporting companies cannot compile a credit history. That means that many immigrants have a “thin” credit file, or no file at all. For those who were able to get credit, a limited understanding of the features of the products and the information about managing credit and debt further damages their ability to obtain future credit. However, this challenge extends beyond personal credit. According to the Small Business Administration, approximately one in 10 immigrant workers owns a business. Again, lack of credit history and information makes it difficult for these immigrant business owners to borrow beyond personal credit cards and loans.Many immigrants are unaware or uniformed about the documentation requirements for opening an account at a credit union. Many believed opening a bank account required a Social Security number or a driver’s license, when in fact, some credit unions accept foreign passports, consular IDs or other alternative forms of identification.The above challenges become even more difficult for individuals who have limited English proficiency. Financial disclosures and other documents may only be available in English and many credit unions do not have bilingual employees, particularly for languages other than Spanish. When financial education materials and documents are provided in other languages, they are often translated from English to their literal foreign language equivalent which can be difficult to understand or even unintelligible for the reader. Language challenges also can cause immigrant consumers to be more susceptible to scams and deceptive practices.Challenges Financial Educators FaceMany of the challenges faced by immigrants correspond to challenges faced by financial educators. Immigrant populations are difficult for financial educators to reach because immigrants, especially those who lack documentation, may not trust offers of help coming from outside their social networks. In addition, many immigrants work nonstandard hours and it may be difficult for credit unions to offer education programs tailored to nontraditional schedules.Perhaps the biggest challenge faced by financial educators is the language barrier. Finding and producing financial education materials in a variety of languages is difficult, especially for less common languages. Translations are often difficult and require expertise to be effective. Finding, hiring, and retaining bilingual and bicultural staff is also difficult.SolutionsOutreach and Awareness CampaignsUsing awareness campaigns and mass media to give immigrant populations information about U.S. financial institutions and trustworthy sources of financial education for those seeking financial education.For those who would not otherwise seek financial education, some organizations have been effective in using “edutainment” with embedded educational content to reach immigrant communities. Financial Education ProgramsFinancial education can be offered through classes or individualized coaching. These services are often tailored to meet immigrant needs.An essential part of increasing financial awareness for consumers who have limited English proficiency is providing language-accessible materials.Many organizations implement Individual Development Account (IDA) programs or similar matched savings programs that are combined with financial education to help low- and moderate-income individuals save for short- and long-term asset-building purchases. The Assets for Independence (AFI) program is a major funder of IDAs available to the broader U.S. population. 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Jane Pannier Jane Pannier is Senior Vice President and in-house counsel for AffirmX LLC, a developer of an innovative remote compliance review solution. Ms. Pannier is also SVP of AdvisX, a CUSO … Web: www.affirmx.com Details The CFPB’s ResponseFirst, the report specifically mentions that CFPB contact centers can assist consumers in more than 180 languages. The calls they have received in languages other than English and Spanish have “consistently increased month over month.” While your institution may not have the resources for that kind of linguistic coverage, it is still a good idea to be as prepared as possible to meet consumers’ language needs.In addition, the CFPB developed “The Newcomer’s Guides to Managing Money,” which are intended to provide immigrants with basic and straightforward financial information. These guides are available in a variety of languages and focus on the following topics:Ways to receive moneyWays to pay billsChecklist for opening an accountSelecting financial products and servicesEven if no hard regulations come of this report, it’s still prudent for credit unions to be aware of the challenges immigrants face when trying to learn how to navigate our financial system and to provide assistance and resources that will serve immigrant consumers in your area. Regulation or not, improved member outreach and service is always something to strive for. Targeted Financial Products and ServicesCredit union services and other small and credit-building loans can be tailored to cater to the needs and experiences of immigrants.Many immigrants like to bank in person, and the customer service experience matters to them. Thus, making customer service and locations accessible to immigrants is beneficial.Making mortgages available to ITIN holders allows many immigrants without other identification documents to secure mortgage loans.Citizenship loan availability makes citizenship available to immigrants who may otherwise not be able to afford the application cost.last_img read more

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St. Louis Team #1 CYO Deanery Champs

first_img2004 Batesville CYO Deanery Championship @ St. Louis Gym.St. Louis  63     Holy Family  62For STL, Ben Wilson 21; Tom Chaffee 19; Connor Dickey 17; Justin Laswell 15; Jordan Dickey 12; Noah Gausman 13; Jacob Wilson 10; Ryan Wilson 9.2014 Batesville CYO Deanery Tourney Brackets ChampionshipAll CYO Deanery Team.Austin kern-St. Martin’s/St. Paul’s; Tyler Calihan-St. Michael’s-1; Ben Wilson-St. Louis-1; Jacob Wilsob-St. Louis-1; and Conner Dickey-St. Louis-1 (MVP).2014 All CYO Deanery TeamSubmitted by CYO Director Roger Dietz.last_img read more

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