24 Easy ‘trumpets’

first_imgBy Paul A. ThomasUniversity of GeorgiaWith the fast-rising popularity of angel trumpets, many gardenersare wanting to start propagating them. But surprisingly little iswritten about how to do it. Volume XXXINumber 1Page 24 For the record, brugmansias, which most people know as angeltrumpets, and some of the closely related daturas are very easyto propagate. The trick is to know when to cut and what to use ascuttings.Cuttings are best taken in June and July. The trick is to takecuttings from branched stems.Straight stems will lead to tall plants that bloom late in thesummer — maybe. Branched stems are “mature” and will bloom a fewweeks after you establish them in the garden.Root cuttingsYou can root cuttings in a mix of peat and sand kept moist. Or,place 4-inch to 6-inch stems in a glass of water, just as youwould an African violet leaf.They root rather fast. Even large stems can be rooted in 5-gallonbuckets. Once you’ve transplanted them to pots or the garden,they’ll need a few weeks of shade to develop extensive roots.Slowly expose them to more sun, and your brugmansias will bepoised to take off.Seeds, though, are another matter.Remember that like most plants, seedlings will vary from theadult. Brugmansia seeds are weird-looking things, similar to aflat bark chip. Pealing off the brown covering speeds germinationbut requires a bit of skill.Be carefulWear gloves when you do this, or at least wash your hands rightafter processing the seeds. Both brugmansias and daturas arepoisonous if eaten, especially the seeds and leaves. Handling theplant isn’t dangerous in itself.Daturas germinate slowly and irregularly, and you’ll needpatience. Both species require warm, moist soil conditions togerminate. It will take at least one summer season, and sometimeslonger, to see the first flowers.To learn more about brugmansias and daturas, visit the AmericanBrugmansia and Datura Society Web site (www.abads.net).(Paul Thomas is a Cooperative Extension horticulturist withthe University of Georgia College of Agricultural andEnvironmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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North Country Hospital raises $160,000 to fight cancer

first_imgNorth Country Hospital,As an oncologist at the Oncology and Hematology Clinic at North Country Hospital in Newport, Les Lockridge MD knows all too well the impact cancer has on patients, their families, and the community. So when about 600 people took part in this year’s Relay for Life in Newport on June 25 and 26 his heart was warmed by the region’s dedication to battling cancer.The event, which included 60 teams, raised almost $160,000, beating out last year’s $143,000.Les Lockridge M.D. and Evelyn Page, a cancer survivor, were two of the several hundred people who attended this year’s relay for life.‘Anytime you have the community rally to fight cancer that is a good thing,’ Dr Lockridge said. ‘A portion of the money goes toward cancer research and remainder goes towards helping patients cover expenses not covered by health insurance.‘At Relay we celebrate the lives of survivors, remember loved ones lost, and fight back so that one day no one hears the words, “You have Cancer”. The Fight Back Ceremony itself is designed to keep people thinking about the ways they can fight back the other 364 days a year,’ explained Dr. Lockridge. ‘Wearing sunscreen, hats, sunglasses, and getting pre-screening treatments like mammograms, colonoscopies, and pap tests are all ways we can be pro-active in our fight against cancer.’For a number of years North Country Hospital’s Oncology and Hematology Clinic has sponsored the Fight Back Ceremony at the relay. This is appropriate since the clinic has been helping patients fight cancer for over 20 years.While nobody wants to get the news they have cancer, Dr. Lockridge said a growing number of people are surviving it.”The future is undeniably bright for cancer care,’ he said.  ‘We’ve made so much progress in the way of non-chemo/non-toxic therapeutics and supportive care (anti-nausea drugs, blood growth factors, etc.) that the face of oncology has changed dramatically from even ten years ago. Treatment is much gentler, our understanding of side effects is greater now, and oncology is still the fastest developing field in medicine. As far as outcomes, cancer is more curable and much more manageable.  Myeloma, for instance, is now more like diabetes in terms of being something you live with rather than die from.’last_img read more

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Lara recovering following health scare

first_imgBRIDGETOWN, Barbados (CMC) – Iconic former West Indies batsman Brian Lara says he has been cleared of anything serious after being admitted to a hospital in Mumbai with chest pains yesterday.In a message to fans and well-wishers, 50-year-old Lara said several of the tests completed by doctors at Mumbai’s Global Hospital in Parel had so far revealed “nothing major” and anticipated leaving hospital by today.“I know everyone is very concerned about what is happening. I think I just extended myself too much in the gym this morning and was feeling a little bit of pain in my chest. I just felt it was best to see a doctor and I was taken to the hospital,” said Lara, a former captain and the Windies record-holder for the most runs in Tests.“The pain continued so obviously a lot of tests have been done. I’m just chilling in my hospital bed watching England versus Australia … but I’m going to be alright. Just letting everyone know I’m fine, recovering and I’ll be back in my hotel room tomorrow.“Couple of the tests that came back already… the doctors were quite happy there was nothing major.”Trinidadian Lara is currently in India performing duties as a media analyst for the ongoing World Cup in England. He is one of the renowned personalities in the game, having scored 11 953 runs in from 131 matches with 34 hundreds and 10 405 runs from 299 One-Day Internationals.He still holds the records for the highest individual score in Tests – 400 not out – and in first class cricket – an unbeaten 501.Lara quit international cricket in 2007 following the historic Cricket World Cup in the Caribbean.He assured fans he would be back on his feet shortly and returning to his normal schedule.“I’ll be back in Trinidad and I’ll be back in full health very soon,” he said.last_img read more

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