Tritium identified in water sample from Connecticut River near Vermont Yankee

first_imgNorthstar Vermont Yankee,The Vermont Department of Health Laboratory analysis of a water sample from the Connecticut River has again detected tritium. This sample was taken from the river on November 3 and had a tritium concentration of 1,120 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). No other radionuclides were detected. The VDH announced the finding today.The Connecticut River samples were pumped from a hose below the surface of the water next to the shoreline where the plume of tritium-contaminated groundwater is moving into the river. River water samples obtained on July 18, July 25, and August 8, 2011 from the same location were also positive for tritium. Tritium concentrations in those samples were 534 pCi/L, 611 pCi/L, and 565 pCi/L respectively. To date, no other radionuclides that could have originated from Vermont Yankee have been detected in river water.The Health Department immediately sent the water sample to its contract laboratory to be analyzed for hard-to-detect radioactive materials including strontium-90. Confirmatory gamma spectroscopy and analysis for tritium will also be done.The Health Department contacted Vermont Yankee to find out if their split of the river water sample had been analyzed. Vermont Yankee informed the Health Department on Tuesday, December 20 that its sample was also positive for tritium at a concentration of 1,230 pCi/L.There is no risk to public health. These low concentrations of tritium at the river’s edge are immediately diluted by the greater volume of river water to the point that they cannot be measured.To date, no tritium has been found at the six other locations in the river that are routinely sampled. No radioactive materials that could have originated from Vermont Yankee have been found in active drinking water wells on or off the plant property. One exception is the COB well, a drinking water well located at Vermont Yankee that had not been used since February 2010, which tested positive for tritium in October 2010. The Departments of Health and Public Safety and the Agency of Natural Resources have requested that the COB well be routinely tested. Vermont Yankee has not agreed to do this.This Connecticut River water sample is one of many samples obtained by the Health Department in its ongoing surveillance of the environment for impacts of the radioactive system leaks identified in early 2010. The sample is also part of a broader environmental surveillance program that uses hundreds of air, water, vegetation, milk, soil, river sediment and other samples to determine if Vermont Yankee releases contribute to increases in the public’s exposure to radiation.The sample results confirm the Conceptual Site Model that indicates small amounts of tritium would eventually reach the river. Bi-weekly sampling of the river will continue in accordance with the Vermont Yankee sampling plan. Follow-up samples taken on November 7 and 10 showed no signs of tritium. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the departments of health in Vermont, New Hampshire and Massachusetts have been notified of the information by Vermont Yankee.  Source: Vermont Dept of Health. Entergy Vermont Yankee 12.21.2011last_img read more

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Series defeat won’t hurt Windies long-term planning: Simmons

first_imgCUTTACK, India (CMC) – West Indies face India in today’s decisive third One-Day International knowing victory will see them end a near two-decade wait for a series victory on the subcontinent.The Caribbean side stunned the hosts by eight wickets in the opening ODI in Chennai before succumbing by 107 runs in the second match in Visakhapatnam last Wednesday.Should West Indies overcome the odds and beat India, the series will mark their first on Indian soil since Carl Hooper’s won a seven-match rubber back in 2002.Left-hander Shimron Hetmyer bats during a training session ahead of today’s decisive ODI.With the importance of the contest looming large, however, West Indies head coach Phil Simmons sought to downplay its significance, pointing out that the current long-term team-building would continue even if they lost.“The thing is we’re trying to build something and the game … does not influence the direction in which we’re going,” Simmons told a media conference.“I think all the guys know we want to play our best … and even though we play our best, we might not win. We might now beat India but we’re trying our best to build something and continue going in the direction we’re going.”Contrasting hundreds from Shimron Hetmyer and Shai Hope in the first ODI saw the Caribbean side overhaul a testing target of 288.Similarly, stroke-filled centuries by openers Rohit Sharma and KL Rahul in the second game, powered India to a massive 387 – their second highest-ever total against West Indies.Faced with a record run chase, West Indies stumbled to 280 all out, undermined by left-arm spinner Kuldeep Yadav’s second career hat-trick.Simmons said it was important to maintain discipline in their bowling right throughout the innings as this had cost the Windies dearly in the last game.“In the last match, we thought that 320, 330 would have been a good score to chase on that ground but in the last four, five overs we let them get away and that’s where we lost the game.”Much will depend on Hope, Hetmyer and Pooran all of whom have already posted big scores, but the spotlight will fall on captain Kieron Pollard who has managed just 35 runs from three innings since his return to ODIs.Pollard, like his opposite number Virat Kohli, suffered the indignity of a one-ball ‘duck’ in the last match and will be hoping to redeem himself quickly.A win will hand West Indies their first ODI series win over India in 13 years but Simmons said regardless of the outcome, he had been impressed with the way his side had challenged the powerful hosts.“They’re definitely the best team in their home conditions and for us to be playing the way we are and giving them a run, it’s great for us to see,” he said.last_img read more

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