Less than 1,200 CVPS customers remain without power

first_imgSeptember 2, 2011 ‘ 8:30 am. The lights came on for many in the last isolated areas last night, but CVPS crews will not rest until every outage is restored.As of 8:30 am, more than 71,000 of the 73,000-plus customer outages have been restored. Outages remain in Windsor, Windham and Orange counties.As we restore power to the last customers, we want to ensure that we are not missing any customers at this point. If your still do not have power, please call CVPS at 1-800-451-2877, and confirm your outage.  However, many customers throughout the state have flood damage to their homes. If a customer’s home or business was flooded, and their electric service panel was affected by water, it has to be examined by a qualified electrician before CVPS can restore service.  CVPS is waiving all fees for temporary service connections required due to the storm.  The fee is normally $80.The lights came on for many customers in Rochester, Pittsfield, Stockbridge, Hancock and Braintree Thursday. A portable substation was delivered to Rochester and was energized, as work continues on the Rochester Substation, restoring power to much of the town.Power was restored to many customers in east Dover and Wardsboro last night. West Jamaica Road, Pikes Falls Road and Water Street in Jamaica are still inaccessible, isolating about 120 customers that our crews cannot reach at this time. We will continue our assessment of that area today to see if there is some way to reach them. Crews hope to restore power to much of South Newfane by tonight.‘While we’re pleased to be able to return power and some sense of normalcy to these customers as swiftly as we have, given the condition of the roads, we know we are not done,’ said President Larry Reilly. ‘There are still dozens of poles to set, many lines to rebuild, many lines to reroute, some for just a few customers at a time. But we’re not stopping until we restore service to every last customer we can.’Line and field workers were greeted to cheers and applause by customers throughout central and southern Vermont this week as they entered communities isolated since Sunday. But crews feel little satisfaction until they can turn on customers’ power.‘We know each and every customer wants their power back, and our crews aren’t truly happy until they’ve restored a customer’s power,’ said Joe Kraus, senior vice president of engineering, operations and customer service. ‘It is disheartening to put up lines and poles, only to know you aren’t restoring power to some customers because their houses are so damaged by flooding that they can’t safely receive electrical service. There are going to be many who need electrical inspections due to flooding, but when they are ready, we’ll be there to restore power.’Some customers in the most remote areas remain inaccessible due to road washouts, but road crews are improving access for utility vehicles daily.  Collaboration with local and state Agency of Transportation officials, and the National Guard, continues.In some cases it is not a question of when the road will be re-opened, but rather when will the new temporary road be built.CVPS urged Vermonters to use extra caution around waterways, many of which are still flowing at very high levels, and new rainfall can cause and has caused flash flooding.Up-to-date outage numbers (by town) can be found at: http://www.cvps.com/CustomerService/outages/(link is external) and http://vtoutages.com/(link is external)last_img read more

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VB : Little supported by former high school team in crowd at Friday’s match

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Comments Published on November 15, 2011 at 12:00 pm Contact Nick: nctoney@syr.edu | @nicktoneytweetscenter_img Before her second-to-last home match at Syracuse, Erin Little couldn’t help but laugh at the loud crowd reaction when she was introduced. During her four-year career, the stands in the Women’s Building were rarely filled with about 30 of her biggest fans. Little’s high school volleyball team from Burnt Hills came to watch her play a day before the high school team’s state playoff match at Cicero-North Syracuse High School. High school teammates, friends, family members and former coaches made the match against DePaul on Friday special for Little.A few carried signs crafted with red glitter and glue that read, ‘I Love E-Little.’ The entire group cheered loudly when its hometown player was introduced before the match.‘The player introductions were a little crazy,’ Little said. ‘I’ve never heard cheers that loud.’Little, one of only two players from New York on the SU roster, dominated during her four years at Burnt Hills-Ballston Lake High School and helped her school capture two straight state championships. With many of her former teammates and coaches in the stands Friday, it was a chance to look back at her entire career beginning as a freshman in high school and culminating this season at Syracuse.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBurnt Hills-Ballston Lake head coach Gary Bynon said she contributed to the school’s state title run as a freshman, and was a leader for the Spartans’ second straight state title. Little was honored as the New York State Gatorade Player of the Year during her senior year.‘We have a tradition at our school of winning games,’ Bynon said. ‘No player was bigger for us than Erin was during that span.’That’s high praise from Bynon, who has coached many talented players throughout the years.The Spartans team won its 300th consecutive game in the Suburban Council in September, and Little wasn’t the only big-name player to contribute to that streak. Former SU middle blocker Sarah Morton, a team co-captain in 2009, graduated from Burnt Hills-Ballston Lake, too.Bynon’s star player had to earn her way on the court throughout her SU career, though. Former head coach Jing Pu used Little sparingly this season, favoring other outside hitters Andrea Fisher and Ying Shen.But Kelly Morrisroe increased Little’s playing time when she took over as interim head coach in mid-October. Morrisroe said the playing time helped win her team more games. The Orange won six of its last nine games to earn the fourth seed in the Big East tournament, which begins Friday.‘Erin’s veteran leadership really helped our team, especially our team offense,’ Morrisroe said. ‘But just having her on the court helps.’Bynon had the same experience coaching Little in high school.Bynon said he took his team to watch Little play Friday because she does everything ‘the right way.’ He called Little a great role model both on and off the court.‘You couldn’t ask for a better representation of our program,’ Bynon said.Spartans libero Siena Wilder and setter Natalie Ziskin are two players who see Little the same way their coach does. Wilder said seeing Little play at the Division I level gives her reason to believe she can play in college, too.Ziskin recalled fond memories of playing with Little.‘I was just in eighth grade when I played with her, but she was our go-to player for everything,’ Ziskin said. ‘Not just for volleyball, either. We’d go to her for advice.’SU sophomore Amanda Kullman, who gave a pregame speech on Senior Day two days later about all three graduating players, couldn’t agree more. Kullman said she’s going to miss having players like Little around.Little finished with seven kills and three blocks against DePaul on Friday and helped SU defeat Notre Dame in the regular-season finale on Sunday. For the senior, her final weekend playing at home at Syracuse was a memorable one.‘It’s great to see old coaches and new players before the last game,’ Little said. ‘Especially when they’re cheering that loudly.’nctoney@syr.edulast_img read more

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Helen of Hume

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Helen Patsikatheodorou was the recipient of the 2018 Robert Kumar Community Award for her outstanding contribution to the Hume Community, by Banksia Gardens Community Services at their AGM last week.Her passion for women’s health, support for older people, services for young people, education and multiculturalism, together with her warm exuberance and cheeky humour are usually the first things that come to mind, but Helen’s contributions to Hume go way beyond these.She was first elected to Hume City Council in 2008, serving as mayor in 2011, and again in 2016, before deciding to step down and focus on her health and her family.Mrs Patsikatheodorou is still referred to as the City of Hume’s ‘Pink Mayor’. Now retired from Council after eight years of service, Helen earned her nickname during her second term as Mayor in 2016. After being diagnosed with breast cancer herself, Helen made a point of wearing something pink every day to help remind all women to have regular breast screening.“I am so very proud of my dear friend and colleague Helen for being recognised for all her hard and dedicated community work in Hume,” says Federal Member for Calwell, Maria Vamvakinou MP of the award.“Not only does Helen do a spectacular job in leading my office, and mentoring my team, but it’s the care, compassion, empathy and understanding she has of the Calwell community that makes this award especially deserved,” Ms Vamvakinou added.“I am really lost for words,” Mrs Patsikatheodorou said. “I didn’t expect the Award and I don’t expect reading about my achievements or the things that I do. They just have to be done. I am normally the one praising the amazing people in our community and in particular our young people.“I live in a community of high needs, but I wouldn’t live anywhere else.“I live with that raw emotion daily, but I also see the continual fight by all our residents to do better, be better.“If I can be part of that story and provide the encouragement, hold a hand, say a kind word or just acknowledge the effort, the achievement or the right to be heard then I have served my community.“I am very humbled by this award.”During her second term as Mayor, Helen was one of 12 mayors appointed to a panel that directly advised the Victorian Minister for Local Government. After deciding not to run for re-election, Helen returned to her previous job with Federal Member for Calwell, Maria Vamvakinou, where she is able to continue her commitment to the local community, and put her advocacy skills to good use helping constituents and local groups. Helen’s professional training is in early childhood education, with a particular focus on children with intellectual disabilities. She worked in a number of special development school and child care settings for more than 20 years, including establishing and directing the Broadmeadows Multicultural Early Learning Centre on the Ford Factory site in 1988.Helen’s voluntary and community work is extensive. She was the founding member of the Neurofibromatosis Association of Victoria, and ran this support and awareness organisation for 15 years. She has been one of the driving forces behind the Greek Community of Broadmeadows and Districts, together with her late husband, John. She helped establish the Craigieburn Residents’ Association, and is currently a Board member at Dallas Neighbourhood House and Meadow Heights Learning Centre. She is a strong and active supporter of the Hume Interfaith Network.Helen is still invited to attend and address a huge range of community events in Hume, despite no longer being an elected councillor. Her passion for her community is as strong as ever. It was an enormous shock to all of us when Helen’s beloved husband, John, suddenly passed away very recently. John was also a passionate and active community member, having served on committees and boards of a long list of local organisations and groups. Together, they were indeed a ‘dynamic duo’. Helen is the proud mother of three sons, Dimitri, Stratos and Nikolas. Helen personifies passion and compassion. She is a tenacious fighter for ordinary people’s rights, and for holding both elected and professional officials to account in serving the needs of the community. Helen has said that she hopes her work encourages other women to also become future leaders.Most of all, Helen is a lover and nurturer of life, her warmth and humour impossible to resist.last_img read more

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