Tritium identified in water sample from Connecticut River near Vermont Yankee

first_imgNorthstar Vermont Yankee,The Vermont Department of Health Laboratory analysis of a water sample from the Connecticut River has again detected tritium. This sample was taken from the river on November 3 and had a tritium concentration of 1,120 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). No other radionuclides were detected. The VDH announced the finding today.The Connecticut River samples were pumped from a hose below the surface of the water next to the shoreline where the plume of tritium-contaminated groundwater is moving into the river. River water samples obtained on July 18, July 25, and August 8, 2011 from the same location were also positive for tritium. Tritium concentrations in those samples were 534 pCi/L, 611 pCi/L, and 565 pCi/L respectively. To date, no other radionuclides that could have originated from Vermont Yankee have been detected in river water.The Health Department immediately sent the water sample to its contract laboratory to be analyzed for hard-to-detect radioactive materials including strontium-90. Confirmatory gamma spectroscopy and analysis for tritium will also be done.The Health Department contacted Vermont Yankee to find out if their split of the river water sample had been analyzed. Vermont Yankee informed the Health Department on Tuesday, December 20 that its sample was also positive for tritium at a concentration of 1,230 pCi/L.There is no risk to public health. These low concentrations of tritium at the river’s edge are immediately diluted by the greater volume of river water to the point that they cannot be measured.To date, no tritium has been found at the six other locations in the river that are routinely sampled. No radioactive materials that could have originated from Vermont Yankee have been found in active drinking water wells on or off the plant property. One exception is the COB well, a drinking water well located at Vermont Yankee that had not been used since February 2010, which tested positive for tritium in October 2010. The Departments of Health and Public Safety and the Agency of Natural Resources have requested that the COB well be routinely tested. Vermont Yankee has not agreed to do this.This Connecticut River water sample is one of many samples obtained by the Health Department in its ongoing surveillance of the environment for impacts of the radioactive system leaks identified in early 2010. The sample is also part of a broader environmental surveillance program that uses hundreds of air, water, vegetation, milk, soil, river sediment and other samples to determine if Vermont Yankee releases contribute to increases in the public’s exposure to radiation.The sample results confirm the Conceptual Site Model that indicates small amounts of tritium would eventually reach the river. Bi-weekly sampling of the river will continue in accordance with the Vermont Yankee sampling plan. Follow-up samples taken on November 7 and 10 showed no signs of tritium. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the departments of health in Vermont, New Hampshire and Massachusetts have been notified of the information by Vermont Yankee.  Source: Vermont Dept of Health. Entergy Vermont Yankee 12.21.2011last_img read more

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PREMIUM‘The street is a blank canvas’: Street artists brighten up local communities in Jakarta

first_imgNestled under a busy road in Central Jakarta, giant and vibrant murals greet passersby at the Kendal tunnel near the Dukuh Atas MRT station.Anyone walking through the tunnel can enjoy a mural painting of a black and white “squid” monster figure with bulging eyes and teeth-like tentacles alongside an orange-blue majestic roaring lion on the walls.Created in July 2019 and initiated by the Jakarta administration, the mural was created by a Indonesian street artist who goes by the nickname Darbotz and Snyder, a German street to represent the 25 years of friendship between sister cities Berlin and Jakarta.The 39-square-meter wall at the tunnel is also painted with other murals that pay homage to old-school public transportation services in Jakarta, such as the three-wheeler bajaj (motorized pedicab) and the medium-sized Metro Mini bus, the popularity of which has start… Linkedin LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Facebook Forgot Password ? Google street-art graffiti-art artists Jakarta-administration public-space Log in with your social account Topics :last_img read more

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Abortion: Rights groups weigh in on teen pregnancy

first_imgNZ Herald 4 June 2015A petition seeking a law change that would require parents to be informed before their daughter has an abortion is unnecessary and potentially dangerous, says an abortion rights advocate.Abortion Law Reform New Zealand spokeswoman Annabel Henderson Morell said most teenagers already told their families when they needed an abortion, and those who did not did so for their own wellbeing.“Almost always it’s because they know that would lead to a situation of coercion where they would be forced to carry through with a pregnancy they don’t want to have,” she said.“There’s also horrible instances of family violence, incest or sexual abuse.”Bob McCoskrie, director of conservative lobby group Family First NZ, said he would support a law change.“While a parent has to sign a letter for their daughter to go on a school trip to the zoo or to play in the netball team, they are totally excluded from any knowledge or granting of permission for that same child to have a surgical abortion.“It begs the question – what is so unique about abortion procedures which allows for the prohibition of parental consent?”Mr McCoskrie said younger teenagers were less able to make the decision to have an abortion on their own.“A recent research paper argued that most female adolescents only start to acquire sufficient autonomous capacity from the age of 14 years and as such the legislative wording of the current law is problematic and arguably careless.”http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11459930Family First want major concerns over young pregnant girls reviewedMaori Television 4 June 2015According to the Care of Children Act 2004, a girl of any age can give consent to an abortion.Now, Family First NZ is calling on politicians to look at major concerns to ensure young pregnant girls in a crisis situation receive the right family support and care.National Director of Family First NZ Bob McCroskie says parents are totally excluded from any knowledge or granting of permission for their child to be put on the pill or have a surgical abortion.Bob McCroskie says “This all effectively means that while a parent has to sign a letter for their daughter to go on a school trip to the zoo or to play in the netball team, they are totally excluded from any knowledge or granting of permission for that same child to be put on the pill or have a surgical abortion. It begs the question – what is so unique about abortion procedures which allows for the prohibition of parental consent?”https://www.maoritelevision.com/news/politics/family-first-want-major-concerns-over-young-pregnant-girls-reviewedLobby group call for law changeSunLive 4 June 2015Lobby group Family First NZ have called for a policy change which would see parents notified immediately if their daughter has an abortion.A petition is being presented to Parliament on behalf of a Stratford mother, whose teenaged daughter attempted suicide after a secret abortion was organised by a local school. Her story was featured on TVNZ’s Seven Sharp.According to the Care of Children Act 2004, a girl of any age can give consent to an abortion and that consent operates as if it were given by her parents.The Act effectively means parents need never know that their daughter has had such a procedure. It is the only medical procedure where parents can be ‘kept in the dark’.“This means that while a parent has to sign a letter for their daughter to go on a school trip to the zoo or to play in the netball team, they are totally excluded from any knowledge or granting of permission for that same child to be put on the pill or have a surgical abortion,” says Family First NZ national director Bob McCoskrie.“It begs the question – what is so unique about abortion procedures which allows for the prohibition of parental consent?”Bob says a recent research paper argued that most female adolescents only start to acquire sufficient autonomous capacity from the age of 14 years, and as such, the legislative wording of the current law is problematic and arguably careless.He says the current law is also out of step with the wishes of most New Zealanders.A 2010 independent poll of 1,000 people by Curia Market Research found that four out of five people supported parental notification laws.Bob adds: “In a similar independent poll in 2012, teens (aged 15-21) were asked: ‘Provided it won’t put the girl in physical danger, should parents be told if their school-aged daughter is pregnant and considering getting an abortion?“Almost two out of three young respondents thought the parents should be told, while 34 per cent disagreed.”http://www.sunlive.co.nz/news/101659-lobby-group-call-law-change.htmllast_img read more

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