Storm re-sign two young forwards

first_imgKaufusi has signed for next season with the option of an additional year while Welch has put pen to paper on a new two-year deal to remain in Melbourne.The re-signing of the young props is yet another significant boost for Storm’s forward pack.Kaufusi and Welch join teammates Dale Finucane, Joe Stimson and Jesse and Kenny Bromwich as the latest big men to re-sign with Storm.Welch, 22, has played 33 games in the purple jersey including last year’s NRL Grand Final.Over the last two years his aggressive style of play has proved a real asset for Melbourne. This season has seen Kaufusi break into Craig Bellamy’s starting side.The 24-year-old Tongan international has played every minute, of every game this season, taking his opportunity in the second row with both hands.Read more at melbournestorm.com.aulast_img read more

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Mice study reveals brainheart biomarker for epilepsy after malaria

first_imgAug 28 2018Animals that develop epilepsy after an infection can be identified as early as three months prior to their first seizure by measuring interactions between the brain and the heart, according to new research using a mouse model of post-cerebral epilepsy. Published in JNeurosci, this finding could inform efforts to diagnose and treat acquired epilepsy. Source:http://www.sfn.org/ Related StoriesNovel measures of PD-related brain activity detected with scalp electroencephalographyHealthy blood vessels could help stave off cognitive declineStudy uncovers new hunger pathway in the brainCerebral malaria afflicts more than three million people worldwide, affects young children, and leads to epilepsy in an estimated 15 percent of survivors. Reducing the risk of developing epilepsy and associated fatal complications, such as sudden unexplained death in epilepsy, requires a reliable way to detect and monitor epileptogenesis.By recording neural and cardiac activity in a mouse model of cerebral malaria, Fatemeh Bahari, Bruce Gluckman and colleagues discovered a signal transmitted between the brain and the heart that occurred only in the 75 percent of mice that acquired epilepsy. Translating this biomarker to humans has the potential to improve therapeutic approaches in patients at risk of developing epilepsy, such as those recovering from traumatic brain injury or stroke.last_img read more

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