Southland Conference Extends Agreement with Commissioner Tom Burnett

first_imgA native of Houston, Burnett spent 11 years in a number of roles with the Sun Belt Conference in New Orleans, and previously worked at the American South Conference and Louisiana Tech University, where he also graduated from in 1988.  He and his wife Tracy have a son, Cole, and daughter, Jesse, both students at the University of Oklahoma. With nearly 30 years in conference administration, Burnett has helped to enhance the Southland’s membership with the additions of multiple universities in recent years that give the Southland 13 members in Texas, Louisiana and Arkansas, including members in or near major metropolitan areas such as Houston, San Antonio, New Orleans and Little Rock. Burnett also led a successful community-wide effort to bring the NCAA Division I Football Championship Games to the Southland’s home base of Frisco, Texas, as the league has served as the host conference for the national title contests at Toyota Stadium since 2011. The NCAA has subsequently renewed the agreement twice to keep the national championship game in Frisco through the 2020 event.     He also initiated the Southland’s football officiating consortium with the Big 12 Conference in 2007, a first of its kind dual program that combined singular training, observation, video review and development, a model followed by many other Division I conferences today.  In 2014, the Southland became the first FCS conference to implement full-time instant replay for all football games, regardless of television coverage. “It’s been a tremendous privilege to serve the Southland Conference’s membership over this period of time,” said Burnett, the Southland’s seventh commissioner since its founding in 1963. “I am honored by the Board’s continued confidence in the terrific work of our staff that strives to assist and better our institutional athletic programs, and enhance the academic and athletic opportunities of our 4,200 student-athletes on a daily basis.” FRISCO, Texas – The Southland Conference’s presidential Board of Directors has extended its employment agreement with Commissioner Tom Burnett through June 30, 2022, the league office announced Tuesday. Burnett, who was named to the post in late 2002, recently became the longest-tenured commissioner in the Southland’s 55-year history, surpassing the term of former league leader Dick Oliver, who served in the position from 1971-1987.  “The Southland Board of Directors is very pleased to provide a contract extension for Tom Burnett, now the longest-serving commissioner in league history,” said Dr. Dana G. Hoyt, President of Sam Houston State University and Chair of the Southland Board of Directors. “The presidents continue to recognize the Southland’s steady growth under his watch, including an unprecedented expansion of television coverage, the recent development of a conference-wide strategic plan, the increased quality of championship events, and improvement in the collective academic standing and well-being of Southland student-athletes.” He is also a member of the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Committee that manages the administrative and selection processes for the national championship event, including oversight of the Men’s Final Four. Burnett has served on 10 various NCAA committees and councils during his Southland tenure, including the Division I Committee on Academic Performance and Football Academic Working Group.  He is a member of the Board of Managers for College Football Officiating (CFO), LLC, an entity created by the NCAA and the Collegiate Commissioners Association to enhance and address college football’s officiating matters. Burnett is also a member of the National Football Foundation/College Football Hall of Fame’s Awards Committee, the NFF’s Divisional Honors Court, and the organization’s Football Matters Board of Directors.  He formerly served on the Board of Directors for NCAA Football, and was the FCS Vice President for the Collegiate Commissioners Association in 2007-08.last_img read more

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Canadian businesses message ahead of the election We need immigrant workers

first_imgFeatured Stories A Maple Leaf Foods processing facility. The Conference Board of Canada said that by 2025 all labour force growth in Canada would be driven by new immigrants.Postmedia file photo Comment Canadian businesses’ message ahead of the election: We need immigrant workers Most agree with boosting the yearly number of immigrants and refugees to about one per cent of the population Steve Scherer and Fergal Smith Share this storyCanadian businesses’ message ahead of the election: We need immigrant workers Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn OTTAWA — Canadian unemployment is at an all-time low and businesses have a message for politicians ahead of October’s national election: We need immigrant workers so do not make the campaign about keeping them out.Concern about immigration is on the rise in Canada, according to a recent survey, especially among Conservative voters whose party leads Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s Liberals in polls ahead of October elections.Unlike the United States where immigration is viewed by some as a threat, Canadian businesses broadly support Trudeau’s promise to boost the number of immigrants and refugees allowed into the country every year to about one per cent of the population. Immigration plans won’t add to Quebec’s skills shortage problem: Legault If Toronto’s so unfair to immigrants, why do immigrants keep flocking to Toronto? Canada’s farm labour shortage is costing billions and expected to rise: report Immigration’s impact on home prices hard to quantify — until you take it away “We don’t want immigration to be used as a political weapon here as it has been in the United States,” said Goldy Hyder, head of the Business Council of Canada, whose members employ 1.7 million people.“We agree with the federal government’s targets and we need to meet those targets … The facts clearly demonstrate that Canada is going to need immigrants to help grow the economy.”With unemployment at 5.4 per cent, the lowest level since comparable data were first published in 1976, Canada needs workers. A June 25 report showed the country’s farm labour shortage is costing billions and is expected to balloon in the next decade.Packaged meat producer Maple Leaf Foods Inc.’s pork-processing plant in Brandon, Man. is operating at 80 per cent capacity due to both labour and hog shortages, said Susan Yaeger, head of recruiting and hiring. The hog deficit is a function of not being able to find skilled workers to operate the company’s commercial farms.Because of (Canada’s) low unemployment … there’s of course a dwindling labour pool for us to recruit from and our business is growingSusan Yaeger, Maple Leaf Foods Facebook advertisement Email 8 Comments Morecenter_img For People’s Party leader Maxime Bernier, who split from the Conservatives, that is too much. He wants to cut immigration levels, and so does the Quebec provincial government. While the promise to do so helped put Quebec’s right-leaning government in power last year, Bernier is now polling nationally at about one per cent.Conservative leader Andrew Scheer, who holds a slight lead over Trudeau, so far has acknowledged that “immigration, done right, is good for the economy and good for jobs.”Companies across Canada are facing the same problem as Maple Leaf Foods. The meat-processing industry alone will need 25,000 workers over the next dozen years, according to a study by the Food Processing Skills Canada.On Tuesday, the Conference Board of Canada said that by 2025 all labour force growth in Canada would be driven by new immigrants.The Chamber of Commerce in Ontario wants to further increase the number of workers brought into the country.“We could do with even more (immigrants),” said Rocco Rossi, head of Ontario’s Chamber. “We have enormous needs.” Join the conversation → Sponsored By: ← Previous Next → “Because of our low unemployment … there’s of course a dwindling labour pool for us to recruit from and our business is growing,” she said.Despite this, some politicians are pushing to reduce the number of immigrants and refugees coming to Canada every year.Two-thirds of Canadians who said they voted for the Conservative Party said there were too many visible minorities in the country, a sentiment that grew from 53 per cent in 2015, according to an April Ekos Politics survey.Under Trudeau, Canada’s population growth accelerated to 1.4 per cent in 2018 from 0.8 per cent in 2015, official data show. That compares with U.S. population growth of about 0.6 per cent in the same period.The number of new permanent residents climbed by 12 per cent in 2018 to 321,035, the highest yearly figure since 1913, eclipsing the government’s target of 310,000.We could do with even more (immigrants). We have enormous needs.Rocco Rossi, Ontario Chamber of Commerce June 27, 20191:01 PM EDT Filed under News Economy Reuters Reddit What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation Twitterlast_img read more

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