Jeremy Corbyns spokesperson has confirmed that it

first_imgJeremy Corbyn’s spokesperson has confirmed that it is Labour policy to end freedom of movement once the UK leaves the EU.The 2017 manifesto, For the Many Not the Few, began its section on immigration with the statement: “Freedom of movement will end when we leave the European Union.” It added: “Labour will develop and implement fair immigration rules.”After PMQs today, in which the Prime Minister cited ending free movement as an area of agreement, the Labour leader’s office said that this pledge remains party policy and that Labour supports “fair rules and reasonable management of migration”.There has been doubt over whether this was still the case, particularly as Labour recently backed an indicative votes motion setting out a Norway-style Brexit – termed Common Market 2.0 – which would entail single market membership and therefore free movement of people.But LabourList understands that the party doesn’t consider the amendments it whipped for earlier this week – Theresa May’s deal plus a customs union; Common Market 2.0; a confirmatory public vote on “any” deal – to now be party policy.In a recent LabourList readers’ survey, over 83% of respondents said freedom of movement should continue as part of the UK’s future relationship with the EU.On the matter of another referendum, Corbyn’s spokesperson said: “Our policy is to support a public vote to prevent a damaging Tory Brexit or no deal.” This was repeated when it was asked whether this means a Brexit deal including customs union membership would be subject to a public vote.The implication is that Labour’s alternative plan – meeting its five demands for a customs union, close alignment with the single market, dynamic alignment on rights and protections, etc – would not have to be ‘put to the people’ in another referendum.If that is the case, Corbyn would not require May to agree to another referendum or the ‘Kyle/Wilson‘ plan as a condition of his support for the deal – despite many Labour MPs urging him to make this a requisite for their votes.Corbyn is understood to be going into talks with the Prime Minister this afternoon with his five demands as the basis for cross-party negotiations. He will be accompanied by Labour whip Nick Brown, Shadow Brexit Secretary Keir Starmer and Shadow Business Secretary Rebecca Long-Bailey.Asked why Long-Bailey, who is thought not to be keen on backing another referendum, was joining the meeting, the spokesman replied: “A substantial number of our demands relate to her brief.”Tags:Immigration /Labour /Jeremy Corbyn /Free Movement /freedom of movement /Brexit /last_img read more

Continue reading

New Affordable Housing Development Renews Parking Woes

first_img“How wonderful to take a parking lot and make it into a park and make it into housing. But we’ve got a parking lot that’s going to go away,” said Andy Thornley, a senior analyst with the Municipal Transportation Agency. Thornley referenced the years-long conversations about parking in the area and said that the agency has not “come to a good place” regarding a solution. The use of surface land for parking lots is an under-utilization in the current housing market, Thornley said. Neither the city nor a private developer would build an underground lot in the neighborhood either, however, because of frequent flooding.“It’s like building a submarine,” he said. The expense of either armor-coating the parking lot or installing technical workarounds would be prohibitively expensive to any party, Thornley said. “You would have to have pumps running constantly.”For the presenters, the solution was to take public transit. While project sponsors emphasized that tenants of below-market-rate units typically own fewer cars than other residents, Thornley said walking, biking, and riding BART or MUNI is a must in the transit-rich neighborhood.“You’ve got a really great fabric here to get along without a car,” he said. Thornley acknowledged that “some people need to make some trips, sometimes, by car” and that industrial employees of the area arriving early in the morning before transit opens would likely be unsatisfied with the lack of parking. The new housing project has no dedicated parking space, however, so the dozens of drivers who currently use the parking lot will have to find spaces on the street or begin commuting by bus or rail. Thornley said this was not a solution per se and that the transportation agency would continue searching for options, but added that he does not envision a magic bullet and believes the housing project a victory.“As we take housing for cars and turn it into housing for people — I personally think that’s a good reinvestment,” he said.After a presentation by project sponsors, attendees broke off into small groups to discuss questions they had about the housing development. Though some centered on parking, most spoke on other issues, like the need for more of the units to be dedicated to the formerly homeless.“Do you know how many homeless are out there?” said Nina Ticzon, who works for the Mission SRO Collaborative, a non-profit that advocates for tenants of single-room occupancy hotels.Currently, the project reserves 20 percent — all one-bedroom studios — of its units for youth aged 18-24 transitioning from foster or state care, with an additional 10 percent for non-youth formerly homeless. The remaining 70 percent will go to families earning up to $55,000 for a three-person household. “I think that it should have been 20-20,” Ticzon said, hoping to bump up the homeless allotment to 40 percent. Ticzon, who lives in an SRO, emphasized the difficulty of finding such a unit in the city. “It took me 20 years to get into the SRO I’m in.”Dairo Romero speaking to a group of locals about the new affordable housing project. Photo: Joe Rivano Barros / Mission Local.Others asked whether the project could involve local artists, pondered the environmental certification of the building, and wanted to know whether the planned public bathrooms for a ground-floor cafe might be open at all times.“Folks have to go to the bathroom in the middle of the night,” said one man.Specific incorporations from community input would be made at later meetings, project sponsors said. This first gathering was an attempt to get feedback from all involved. “Our goal is not to answer questions today, but to try to get down as many as possible,” Feng said. Community meetings are planned through the spring of 2016. The development should begin construction in 2018 — though the next door park will break ground early next year — and residents can expect to move in by 2019 or 2020, according to project sponsors. 0% A new fully affordable housing development scheduled to be built at the corner of 17th and Folsom renewed longstanding fears about parking availability at a community meeting held yesterday, though most residents welcomed the 101-unit project for its affordability.“The street’s going to be impacted unless there’s more parking,” said Kian Alavi, a resident of the block across from the parking lot. Alavi said he is by no means “pro-car” and welcomed the housing, but wanted developers to realize that parking is a dwindling resource in the area. “It’s a reality. If you don’t plan for it, it’s going to be an issue.”The seven-story housing development and the planned park next door will be built on the site of a 220-space parking lot. The addition of some 70 families and 30 single tenants will put additional pressure for parking in an industrial area in which employees and businesses have previously protested the planned conversion of the parking lot.Testimony at the community meeting, however, was less divisive than in the past. Most acknowledged the need for housing in the Mission District, though no specific solutions were offered for the parking shortfall.center_img Tags: Affordable Housing • cars • housing • parking Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

Continue reading

Mission Techies React to Controversial Homeless Rant

first_img Tags: homeless • mission • tech Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% “He did the stereotypical thing that the tech force is criticized for, which is rant about it on the internet,” Lopez said.Keller’s statements included calling the homeless “riff raff,” for which he later apologized, but he did not offer any viable solutions to dealing with homelessness. Many who live and work in tech in the Mission district said they agreed with Keller’s message, but disagreed with the delivery.“A lot of people out here are very educated, they come from different places and maybe they can’t relate,” said Jamie Gasparella, who is in marketing for tech companies. “Maybe it was an honest opinion about a problem that he saw, and what he saw moved him. The way he said it was misconceived by a lot of people, but it started a conversation.”Keller’s decision to speak out made him the latest poster child for an issue that strikes a nerve with many of the city’s residents — the economic disparities that exist in San Francisco’s rapidly gentrifying communities.“Homeless people have been here before tech got to San Francisco. Sure, tech brought beneficial additions to the city, but there needs to be a balance,” said Arrianne Talma, who works in marketing for a tech startup.Talma said she found Keller’s comments to be narrow-minded.  “He does not understand the problem fully. The entrepreneur spirit in tech is supposed to be finding solutions to a problem, so that means you actually have to offer a solution.”Most stated that Keller’s views are not prevalent throughout the tech industry. “There are many other rich people that talk about this stuff and are also assholes and they are not in tech,” said a tech worker who declined to give his name. “I don’t think it’s fair to demonize the industry over one person’s personal opinions — his opinion is not common in the industry at all.”Observing many of the young and affluent people moving to the neighborhood the past five years, longtime Mission resident Greg Clayton said he understands Keller’s intolerance for poverty. “Young people are moving in with lots of money from the suburbs, maybe they are coming from mall communities and have a different aesthetic visually,” said Clayton. “Maybe he’s not talking about the homeless, but the things that come along with homelessness like crime and trash.”In the letter, the entrepreneur states that he has been living in San Francisco for three years — long enough to witness homelessness escalate. “Without a doubt it is the worst it has ever been,” he said.  “San Francisco’s homeless problem predates you — by a lot,” reads a blog post by a different man named Justin Keller, who said that his social media channels “erupted” thanks to the entrepreneur. Pointing to a culture of compassion that has shaped San Francisco since the 1906 earthquake, this Keller wrote:  “One of the things that’s made San Francisco great is the empathy and compassion historically shown to people without anywhere or anything.”“What I get from that is that he is a typical tech worker…new to the city, new to the Bay Area culture of openness, acceptance, and compassion in dealing with real-life problems,” said Chris Young, who has been living in a tent at Florida and 17th streets since he was evicted from his Mission home in October. “People here love to rant because they find validation in it and in ridiculing the homeless. I’m tired of it.”Keller wrote that he did not want to subject his visiting parents to what most San Franciscans see daily, presumably “the pain, struggle, and despair of homeless people” that he sees going to and from work. Yash Chechani, a product manager who splits his time between San Francisco and Santa Clara, said that although Keller’s delivery was “off,” he understands the intention behind his letter.“I think it’s good to have zero homeless people, but not because I want to show a clean city to my parents, but because we actually need to house these people,” said Chechani. “During Super Bowl they were suddenly gone. I don’t know what the city did, honestly — if they were chased somewhere else. I do see [Keller’s] point in that we need to solve the problem permanently.”Bhautik Joshi, a senior software engineer at Flickr, agreed that Keller’s lack of empathy should not be used against him — rather, it should be treated as an opportunity to inspire others who share his values to care and to take action. “He didn’t get it, so maybe there is some way of reaching out to people like him and giving them a hook. It was a lost opportunity,” said Joshi. “If he spent a little more time understanding and searching for empathy, he could have done some real good. But it’s not too late.” 0%center_img Startup founder Justin Keller has come under a barrage of internet fire for posting an open letter to city officials with the complaint that he is forced to witness the struggles of homeless individuals on city streets.“The wealthy working people have earned their right to live in the city. They went out, got an education, work hard, and earned it,” wrote Keller in his letter to Mayor Ed Lee and Police Chief Greg Suhr, which he posted on his personal blog on February 15. “I shouldn’t have to see the pain, struggle, and despair of homeless people to and from my way to work every day.”Readers immediately responded by labelling Keller a “Tech Bro,” “douchebag,” and “entitled” on Twitter, Medium and Facebook.Michael Lopez, a prep cook at Southern Pacific Brewing on Treat Avenue, understands the frustration. last_img read more

Continue reading

Sunflower Vietnamese – an old friend rises again

first_imgThe dish gets its name from the motion of the skillet required to cook meat properly, constantly moving over the flame so it doesn’t stick. Sunflower’s version isn’t the most authentic – French fries? Come on! Typical accompaniments are watercress, tomatoes, and/or a lime-and-black pepper dipping sauce. But you’ll never hear me complain about fries, unless they’re poorly done, and these were not. Besides, what matters in this dish is the beef, and this is one of the better renditions of bo luc lac I’ve had. Super tender, juicy, deeply flavored with a caramel/saltiness, and just a hint of spice. Kind of swoon-worthy. And fries are always in season.We shared a humongous platter of garlic noodles …garlic noodles Vietnamese garlic noodles hold their own in the pantheon of Asian Noodles You Must Eat. The umami factor of Sunflower ‘s is very high – garlicky, sweet, salty, plus springy-textured and eggy…. They’re one of my guiltiest pleasures.The BF got his standard: Bún Thịt Nuớng with cha gio, or grilled pork over vermicelli noodles, topped with Imperial rolls.vermicelli pork imperial rolls I’ve learned that Sunflower has a sister spot in Potrero Hill but I’ve never been. Also, during the Mission closures, the same team debuted Indochine, a vegan Asian restaurant, right next door at 508 Valencia. But for my money, Sunflower hits the spot every time and still screams anti-gentrification.Glad you’re back…Sunflower Vietnamese3111 16th St., San Francisco, CA 94103and506 Valencia St., San Francisco, CA 94103(415) 626-5022 A bowlful of cool rice noodles are the bed for deliciously crunchy fried rolls stuffed with more noodles and ground pork, shredded, slightly pickled carrots, and gorgeous charred pork. The whole thing is bathed in nuoc cham – that quintessential Vietnamese elixir of fish sauce, citrus and sugar – and squirted with Sriracha, if you like. I do think Sunflower’s is the BF’s favorite version of this dish.I had a glass of ***horrors*** – house chardonnay! Unfortunately, Sunflower’s wine “list” is limited to a chard and a cab (and beer.) But it looked so cool and inviting on someone else’s table, and for once I didn’t find it buttery or oaky.On our second visit, we shared a combo appetizer which consisted of grilled lemongrass pork, grilled shrimp, rice noodles, imperial rolls, basil, lettuce, mint, daikon, carrots, etc. for wraps, and disks of rice paper, set in this cute little contraption I’d never seen before. One compartment holds the rice paper disks and the other has warm water in it. You dip your paper in to the water and spin it until it just gets bendy enough to make a wrap. Ingenious!combo appetizer The BF got an order of “tender grilled beef” which also came with rice paper, greens, and mint. Lemon-grassy and very fresh tasting. They really know how to char meat here.tender grilled beef Essentially, we had deconstructed bun thit nuong, reconstructed into make-your-own rolls. All very tasty!We also got an order of som tum that sadly wasn’t even one tiny bit spicy. We added sriracha, which also isn’t very spicy, but I still could have eaten that salad for days.green papaya saladcenter_img 0% What, another Vietnamese resto review? But wait – it’s not just any Vietnamese place… it’s Sunflower! Risen again from its oh-too-long hibernation!We’ve been going to Sunflower off and on for about 12 years now. Originally opened in 1998, it is well-known for having one kitchen for two restaurants that straddle Valencia and 16th Streets. The one on 16th was the more casual branch – a little more brightly lit, tiny, and a draw for anyone who needed a quick Vietnamese fix before a movie at the Roxie.The branch on Valencia was perhaps the more “grown-up” version, with (really old) carpeting, prints on the walls, a more somber palette, and considerably larger. Sunflower on Valencia was our go-to, in large part because of a sassy Asian waiter whose name is now escaping me (Henry, Harry?), but his baby-faced smile and cheerful patter was the pleasant backdrop for our favorite dishes. However, both outlets closed mysteriously in 2014 – supposedly to remodel (and really, not a moment too soon). In 2015 the one on 16th reopened, seemingly unchanged, and signs on the Valencia joint appeared, promising to “Open Soon!” Alas, they kept us breathlessly waiting – for two more years. Finally, in April 2017 Valencia re-opened to very little fanfare.A little sleeker, cleaner inside, and thank god that carpet is gone… We had to try all of our stand-bys, just to see if they still had the stuff. For my main, I ordered the thit bo luc lac, or shaking beef…shaken beef Tags: restaurant reviews Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

Continue reading

Neighborhood Notes two marches a new bar and Jenny Lemons

first_imgBarrel ProofA new bar called Barrel Proof is opening on Mission Street between 19th and 20th streets, in the former site of Cease & Desist. Last May, Cease & Desist’s owners (also the owners of Tonic Nightlife Group bar empire, which includes Dr. Teeth) sold the bar to David Zimmerman, the owner of Cabin on Polk Street and the Blackthorn Tavern in the Inner Sunset. Tags: bars • protests • shopping Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% 0%center_img Zimmerman has apparently been busy since then. He is reopening the bar as Barrel Proof which, according to a man who identified himself only as a manager, said could be opening “this weekend, next week or a month from now.” “We don’t know yet,” he said. March on the Mission (M.O.M.) Join Mission District artists, activists, performers, musicians and other members of its creative community during their march through the Mission in protest of the Trump Administration and its values. The self-proclaimed “sister event” of the Women’s March is a safe and family-friendly event, organizers say. The march begins at 12 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 21 at 1295 Alabama St. Afterward, drop in at the Pacific Felt Factory arts complex at 2830 20th St. to check out a pop-up reception and art show that features artists Amy Kisch, Danielle Smith and Kimberly Verde. March for the Mission March on the Mission should not be confused with March for the Mission, which takes place this coming Thursday and is aimed at protesting the high-end restaurants, luxury development and red lanes that everyone loves to hate. The march begins at 20th and Mission at 12 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 25. Jenny Lemons A new shop and studio at 3043 24th St. focused on “handmade and artisan goods” will officially open in early February. The store, called Jenny Lemons, will mostly serve as a place for the company to manufacture and sell its line of hand-printed clothing, but it will also offer DIY workshops and sell the work of local artists as well as “a curated selection of art supplies.” “Jenny Lemons is very focused on building a community space that supports artists, giving them a place to sell their work and the opportunity to teach workshops in their area of expertise,” the company said in a statement. The grand opening will take place Feb. 1, from 6 to 9 p.m. at 3043 24th St. last_img read more

Continue reading

Photo illustration The Mission during the 1906 quake vs today

first_imgSpecial thanks to OpenSFHistory.org. for the original photos! The original church besides the spanish mission was nearly demolished in the earthquake. Later replaced with the Basilica we now know. The adobe church survived the earthquake and was later renovated. Archive image provided by OpenSFHistory.org | OpenSFHistory / wnp15.1144.jpgThe church today: The venerable Dolores Park later served as the grounds for a tent city during the disaster relief right after the earthquake. The original image shows Mission High School towards the old city skyline. That high school building was destroyed in a fire and rebuilt in the 1920s. Archive image provided by OpenSFHistory.org | OpenSFHistory / wnp27.0119.jpThe park today vs. 1906 0% Titled “Capp Near 17th Street,” the original shows broad sidewalks and a buckled up street and lazily hanging street post. Image provided by OpenSFHistory.org | OpenSFHistory / wnp59.00094.jpgcenter_img This is the street today: The 1906 earthquake leveled most of San Francisco and its old glamour. But the city persisted, rebuilt and now looks to the future. We thought it would be neat to look at some nearby places and see what they looked like during or after the great earthquake and compare it to how the city looks now. All of the archive imagery was provided by OpenSFHistory.org.The locations are approximate, however, some streets might have shifted or landmarks disappeared. Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

Continue reading

Southport plans MLK Jr Day events

first_imgSOUTHPORT, NC (WWAY) — Southport’s ​Martin​ ​Luther​ ​King​ ​Celebration​ ​Committee has planned a two day celebration of the Martin Luther King holiday.It kicks off Sunday at the Southport Fire Department on Howe Street.  A half mile march kicks off at 3:00 p.m. followed by a program with music by the Save Our Community Choir.  It will also include The Howard Brothers: Talmadge, Tashawn, Charlie and Ricky.- Advertisement – On Monday, the ​​highlight of​ ​the​ ​​celebration​ ​is ​the 24th​ ​Annual​ ​Round​ ​Table​ ​Breakfast. It is in the ​Murrow​ ​Hall​ ​of​ ​Trinity​ ​United​ ​Methodist​ ​Church starting at 8:00 a.m..The​ ​keynote​ ​speaker is​ Dr. Glen Harris, Associate Professor at UNCW.  He is the author of several publications, including one on the Trayvon Martin case.Tickets​ ​for​ ​the​ ​breakfast​ ​are​ ​being​ ​sold​ ​in​ ​advance​ ​for​ ​$12.00​ ​each ​at​ ​most Southport area​ ​churches.last_img read more

Continue reading

Sunset Beach Police increase patrols after rash of home breakins

first_img Damage of these home break-ins (Photo: Sunset Beach PD) Damage of these home break-ins (Photo: Sunset Beach PD) “We are asking our residents to be aware and be sure to keep your homes locked and leave exterior lights illuminated when not present in the home,” a new release stated.Police ask you to report any suspicious people, vehicles, or sounds that you may hear. Damage of these home break-ins (Photo: Sunset Beach PD) SUNSET BEACH, NC (WWAY) — Sunset Beach Police has increased patrols across the town after numerous reports of homes being broken into over the past few weeks.According to police, no one was home at the time of the incidents. They reportedly happened on the mainland as well as the island.- Advertisement – Most crimes happened at night, police say. 1 of 5 Damage of these home break-ins (Photo: Sunset Beach PD) Damage of these home break-ins (Photo: Sunset Beach PD) Damage of these home break-ins (Photo: Sunset Beach PD)last_img read more

Continue reading

2019 Azalea Festival Home Tour Kane Home

first_img The Kanes wanted to keep the historic charm in their home, while restoring it to make it their own.One of their favorite parts of the home is the front porch. Audrey Kane says the minute she saw the porch, it drew her in to the house.She also says they added the back sleeping porch to put their own touches on the home.Related Article: Azalea Home Tour: Kokesh Home“We wanted the modern amenities so we would be comfortable living here,” she said. “I would say the front porch is what drew us in, besides the sweetness and the charm of an old neighborhood.”The Kanes are excited to be a part of the tour for their first year and cannot wait to share the home’s history. WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — When one couple moved to Wilmington, they knew they wanted a piece of history in their knew home.That’s what led them to one of Wilmington’s historic plate homes.- Advertisement – last_img read more

Continue reading

Theres something for everyone at Healthy Living Festival 19

first_img You can join in on the fun Saturday, April 13 starting at 9:30 a.m. at Battleship Park at 1 Battleship Rd. in Wilmington.Here’s more information. WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — From healthy snacks and holistic treatments to bouncy houses and pet adoption, there’s something for everyone this weekend at Battleship Park. Grab your whole family for a healthy, fun, and free event everyone can enjoy.Organizer Martin Case sat down with us today to talk all about Healthy Living Festival ’19.- Advertisement – last_img read more

Continue reading